Pathophyisology of an astrocytoma...please help!!!

  1. Can someone help me fix this?

    Astrocytes provide structural support to neurons and their delicate processes, form the blood brain barrier and play a role in synaptic transmission. When the brain is injured, astrocytes act as phagocytes for neuronal debris. Proliferation of astrocytes contributes to the formation of scar tissue in the CNS.

    An astrocytoma is a tumor that arises from the astrocytes. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies astrocytomas into four grades depending on how fast they are growing and the likelihood that they will spread (infiltrate) to nearby brain tissue.

    Grade 1-benign astrocytoma, noninflitrating. Grows slow but becomes very large.
    Grade 2- low-grade astrocytoma, noninfiltrating. This tumor grows relatively slowly and usually does not have well-defined borders.
    Grade 3-anaplastic astrocytoma
    Grade 4- glioblastoma multiforme

    Malignant Astrocytoma is an infiltrating, primary brain tumor, with tentacles that may invade surrounding tissue. This provides a butterfly-like distribution pattern through the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres. The tumor may invade a membrane covering the brain (the dura), or spread via the spinal fluid through the ventricles of the brain. Spread of the tumor (metastasis) outside the brain and spinal cord is rare.
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   sirI
    Quote from lccougar02
    Can someone help me fix this?

    Astrocytes provide structural support to neurons and their delicate processes, form the blood brain barrier and play a role in synaptic transmission. When the brain is injured, astrocytes act as phagocytes for neuronal debris. Proliferation of astrocytes contributes to the formation of scar tissue in the CNS.

    An astrocytoma is a tumor that arises from the astrocytes. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies astrocytomas into four grades depending on how fast they are growing and the likelihood that they will spread (infiltrate) to nearby brain tissue.

    Grade 1-benign astrocytoma, noninflitrating. Grows slow but becomes very large.
    Grade 2- low-grade astrocytoma, noninfiltrating. This tumor grows relatively slowly and usually does not have well-defined borders.
    Grade 3-anaplastic astrocytoma
    Grade 4- glioblastoma multiforme

    Malignant Astrocytoma is an infiltrating, primary brain tumor, with tentacles that may invade surrounding tissue. This provides a butterfly-like distribution pattern through the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres. The tumor may invade a membrane covering the brain (the dura), or spread via the spinal fluid through the ventricles of the brain. Spread of the tumor (metastasis) outside the brain and spinal cord is rare.
    Hello, lccougar02,

    What exactly do you want "fixed"? Just need to know what you are really wanting here......more information?
    Last edit by sirI on Oct 20, '05
  4. by   lccougar02
    well the directions for the paper say:
    Core Pathophysiology
    This is a brief narrative description of the core problem of your patient the day you took care of them. Keep it simple--but take the process to the cellular level. Please identify your source.
  5. by   sirI
    Quote from lccougar02
    well the directions for the paper say:
    Core Pathophysiology
    This is a brief narrative description of the core problem of your patient the day you took care of them. Keep it simple--but take the process to the cellular level. Please identify your source.
    I see. Well, you have a good start. Here are some links that will bring into more detail the patho regarding this tumor. Morbidity and mortality is better outlined when the tumor is graded, you will find.

    http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic2693.htm

    http://www.emedicine.com/ped/topic154.htm

    You may need to sign up on the second one, but, it is free and most informative.

    Good luck.

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