Math Again - page 2

I'm doing some practice problems, and this is from nursesaregreat.com: A procainamide drip is ordered (2 gm in 250 cc of D5W) to infuse at 4mg/kg/min. The patient weighs 165 lbs. Calculate the drip rate in cc/hr for which... Read More

  1. 1
    Quote from RNrerun
    Wow. Thanks for all the help. I'm going to assume there's something wrong with this problem. I'm trying to re-learn all these calculations that I haven't done in years and years, and it doesn't take much to confuse me. I have been using dosagehelp.com to practice, and I'll check out the other one that Esmel reccommended. I'll have to take a medications test at the hospital, and I'm trying to get all this straight in my head before I go in there!

    Thanks!
    There's nothing wrong with the problem.

    In this case, the patient's weight is irrelevant - it doesn't impact the dose, so it's simply left out.

    dose ordered = 2 g in 250 cc (cc = mL)
    infusion rate = 4mg/min

    4mg/min x 250mL/2g x 1g/1000mg x 60min/hr = 30 mL/hr
    GrnTea likes this.

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights: Student Edition newsletter.

  2. 1
    Quote from lethomson91
    There's nothing wrong with the problem.

    In this case, the patient's weight is irrelevant - it doesn't impact the dose, so it's simply left out.

    dose ordered = 2 g in 250 cc (cc = mL)
    infusion rate = 4mg/min

    4mg/min x 250mL/2g x 1g/1000mg x 60min/hr = 30 mL/hr
    The thread is over a year old....and I beg to differ.......the weight IS relevant.....

    A procainamide drip is ordered (2 gm in 250 cc of D5W) to infuse at 4mg/kg/min. The patient weighs 165 lbs. Calculate the drip rate in cc/hr for which the infusion pump will be set at.

    This math question is all about the weight.
    KelRN215 likes this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top