Hyper and hypo ventilation with PaCO2 levels - page 5

by NightNurseRN13

29,240 Views | 47 Comments

i'm confused..... in my book it states hyperventilation occurs when the paco2 is less than 35 mmhg and hypoventilation occurs when the paco2 is greater than 45 mmhg. that doesn't make sense to me. is this a mistake or am i... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from grntea
    i do try. thank you for the kind words.
    toot, toot!
  2. 0
    [QUOTE=FlyingScot;6272024]Would you like mayo with that?[/QUOTE

    Actually why would I need mayo? Even with what you quoted, it in no way matches the assertion you made against me. Go back and read carefully.....
  3. 0
    Anyway, I will leave you guys to your club....wasting my valuable time here...

    Peace
  4. 3
    Thanks Gila and GrnTea! Awesome explanations!!
    Y'all are delving into stuff that I know just enough to get by, but your explanations are making my brain almost actually understand!
    GrnTea, Guttercat, and Hygiene Queen like this.
  5. 0
    I actually just did this in AP2. we had to remember the chemical equations - wow! I hope I don't need that equation when I become a nurse, the words are easier to remember!
  6. 2
    I realize that this is a late response, but I was cleaning out my inbox and saw that there had been many replies.

    Yes, my question was answered and I appreciate all of the answers. I am the type of person that learns not by just reading something and memorizing it. I like to think "why", when I read, I ask myself "why would the body react that way", so all these detailed responses were quite helpful for me.

    I have graduated nursing school, passed my NCLEX and am working as a RN now. While it may be nice to have a respiratory therapist on hand and to just tell the doctors/nurses what to do, I like to be able to be apart of the discussion when it comes to patient care, I like to be able to understand why someone is ordering something and to be able to put in my own opinion that has knowledge base behind it. So, while others may be content on just knowing the bare minimum, I am not and again thank all the people who took the time to explain this.
    Esme12 and GrnTea like this.
  7. 1
    This is a nice visual and simple review of hypo and hyperventilation.
    Hypo the co2 level in the body is high which makes it acidic so you're trying to blow of the co2 slowly. resp. acidosis
    hyper is when the co2 levels are low which means a low ph, so your body starts breathing faster to bring the levels up. resp. alkalosis

    Hyper and Hypoventilation
    Esme12 likes this.
  8. 1
    Quote from abodden
    This is a nice visual and simple review of hypo and hyperventilation.
    Hypo the co2 level in the body is high which makes it acidic so you're trying to blow of the co2 slowly. resp. acidosis
    hyper is when the co2 levels are low which means a low ph, so your body starts breathing faster to bring the levels up. resp. alkalosis

    Hyper and Hypoventilation
    The punctuation in your post makes me wonder if your understanding is exactly backward or not. I think it is. Let's restate this.

    In hypoventilation, you are acidotic precisely because you are not blowing off (acidic) CO2 efficiently (for whatever reason). You're not "trying" to blow off CO2 slowly. "Hypo" means "lower" so "hypoventilation" means "lower than normal air movement in and out of the lungs." Hypoventilation makes you have higher CO2 levels, not lower ones. You need lower CO2 if you are hypoventilating, but hypoventilation isn't going to accomplish that goal. Hypoventilation increases CO2, thus lowering pH.

    Likewise, if you are hyperventilating, you are alkalotic because you are blowing (acidic) CO2 off faster than normal. Breathing fast does not make CO2 levels rise, it does just the opposite. "Hyper" means "higher" so "hyperventilation" means "excessive air movement in and out of the lungs." Hyperventilation is the cause of the loss of CO2, increasing pH.
    Esme12 likes this.


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