How do I recalculate flow rates for infusions? - page 4

by EmilyEmily 4,636 Views | 34 Comments

1. An IV of 500mL was ordered to infuse in 3 hr using a 15gtt/mL set. With 1 1/2 remaining, you discover that only 150 mL is left in the bag. At what rate will you need to reset the flow? 2. An IV of 1000mL was ordered to... Read More


  1. 2
    Quote from EmilyEmily
    Thank you so much. I get it now!! I really appreciate you all being patient with me
    I'm glad.....((HUGS)) you're welcome...
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  2. 1
    Know your conversion tables......
    The Short List 1 cup (c) = 8 ounces (oz)
    1 dram (dr) = 60 grains (gr)
    1 dram (fl dr) = 60 minims
    1 gallon (gal) = 4 quarts (qt)
    1 glass = 8 ounces (oz)
    1 grain (gr) = 64.8 milligrams (mg)
    1 gram (g) = 15.43 grains (gr)
    1 inch (in) = 2.54 centimeters (cm)
    1 kilogram (kg) = 2.2 pounds (lb)
    1 liter (L) = 1.057 quarts (qt)
    1 milliliter (mL) = 16.23 minims
    1 minim = 1 drop (gt)
    1 ounce (oz) = 2 tablespoons (tbsp)
    1 ounce (oz) = 8 drams (dr)
    1 ounce (fl oz) = 29.57 milliliters (mL)
    1 pint (pt) = 16 ounces (oz)
    1 pound (lb) = 16 ounces (oz)
    1 quart (qt) = 0.946 liters (L)
    1 quart (qt) = 2 pints (pt)
    1 tablespoon (tbsp) = 3 teaspoons (tsp)
    1 teacup = 6 ounces (oz)
    1 teaspoon (tsp) = 4.93 mL

    The Long list
    1 central = 45,359 grams (g)
    1 centimeter (cm) = 10 millimeters (mm)
    1 cubic centimeter (cc) = 1 milliliter (mL)
    1 cup (c) = 8 ounces (oz)
    1 drachm = 3.55 milliliter (mL)
    1 dram (dr) = 60 grains (gr)
    1 dram (fl dr) = 60 minims
    1 gallon (gal) = 4 quarts (qt)
    1 gill = 4 ounces (oz)
    1 glass = 8 ounces (oz)
    1 grain (gr) = 64.8 milligrams (mg)
    1 gram (g) = 1,000 milligrams (mg)
    1 gram (g) = 1,000,000 micrograms (mcg)
    1 gram (g) = 15.43 grains (gr)
    1 hand = 4 inches (in)
    1 inch (in) = 2.54 centimeters (cm)
    1 kilogram (kg) = 1,000 grams (g)
    1 kilogram (kg) = 2.2 pounds (lb)
    1 liter (L) = 1000 milliliters (mL)
    1 liter (L) = 1.057 quarts (qt)
    1 meter (m) = 1,000 millimeters (mm)
    1 meter (m) = 100 centimeters (cm)
    1 milligram (mg) = 1,000 micrograms (mcg)
    1 milliliter (mL) = 1 cubic centimeter (cc)
    1 milliliter (mL) = 15 drops (gt)
    1 milliliter (mL) = 16.23 minims
    1 minim = 1 drop (gt)
    1 ounce (fl oz) = 2 tablespoons (tbsp)
    1 ounce (oz) = 20 pennyweights (dwt)
    1 ounce (oz) = 24 scruples
    1 ounce (oz) = 31.1 grams (g)
    1 ounce (oz) = 480 grains (gr)
    1 ounce (oz) = 8 drams (dr)
    1 ounce, fluid (fl oz) = 29.57 milliliters (mL)
    1 palm = 3 inches (in)
    1 pennyweight (dwt) = 24 grains (gr)
    1 pint (pt) = 16 ounces (oz)
    1 pint (pt) = 4 gills
    1 pound (lb) = 16 ounces (oz)
    1 pound (lb) = 350 scruples
    1 quart (qt) = 0.946 liters (L)
    1 quart (qt) = 2 pints (pt)
    1 scruple = 20 grains (gr)
    1 stone = 0.14 cents
    1 tablespoon (tbsp) = 3 teaspoons (tsp)
    1 teacup = 6 ounces (oz)
    1 teaspoon (tsp) = 60 drops (gtt)
    1 teaspoon (tsp) = 4.93 mL
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  3. 0
    if we are to consider these questions are coming from a nurse on duty, how come you always come up with incorrect drop rates for your patients IV, you might end up doing more damage with IV overload on your patients, next time do the computations properly to avoid costly mistakes while on duty.....
  4. 0
    Quote from R. Obias Jr., R.N.
    if we are to consider these questions are coming from a nurse on duty, how come you always come up with incorrect drop rates for your patients IV, you might end up doing more damage with IV overload on your patients, next time do the computations properly to avoid costly mistakes while on duty.....
    I think these questions are coming from a student doing homework... as this is the Nursing Student Assistance forum... and when was the last time you actually had to calculate a drop factor/drop rate on the job? In the real world, we'd be using IV pumps.
  5. 0
    Quote from KelRN215
    In the real world, we'd be using IV pumps.
    Not always...

    I've been in the back of an ambulance sans pumps...

    and in a rural ER...

    and even emergently in the big city ER when we were temporarily out... or taking the patient to MRI

    And not all pumps are "smart pumps;" some are just fancy dial-a-flows.

    But obviously this is just a student who's in the right place...


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