Clinical Failure - page 5

by student1919 12,330 Views | 67 Comments

So, I am on the brink of getting kicked out of my program due to the clinical setting. I arrived late quite a few times and the instructors don't like me or teach me, just reprimand me. I get 80-90% on the exams but it doesn't... Read More


  1. 0
    Everyone has given excellent advice. Would you want a nurse who doesn't arrive on time? Who doesn't follow policies and procedures (which are put in place for a reason?) Who doesn't follow infection control practices? Who doesn't remain current on their certifications, immunizations, TB skin test? Patients, instructors and employers do not want this type of nurse. Develop a remediation plan with your instructor(s) so that you can get back on the right track. Concentrate your energy on succeeding and following the rules. You can do it (if the program is generous enough to give you another chance), but you have to stop making excuses. If you get that chance, TAKE IT SERIOUSLY. Your success is your responsibility & no one else's! Good Luck
  2. 2
    I'm not so sure. Personally, I think this may be the first wave of nursing students who grew up in the era of "everyone gets a trophy just for showing up" and could do no wrong in the eyes of everyone around them.
    Personal responsibility was not something demanded of them as a child and going through life with the attitude of "my instructor doesn't like me and refuses to teach me" is going to be the trend, I predict.
    Trolls don't typically come around again once they put the match to the pile, this OP did make another appearance---albeit to further "explain" why she was in the right and the school is looking to see her fail....

    Quote from Wrench Party
    Wow... I highly suspect this is a troll. No self-respecting nursing student I know would admit all of these mistakes,
    and would have had their a-- hauled in a long time ago for unprofessional behavior. You are disrespecting yourself, your
    clinical instructor, the program, the primary nurses, and pretty much every other health care professional in the field by
    not taking responsibility for your actions.

    I wish you luck in correcting your actions, but you REALLY need to get it together if you want to succeed.
    Paco-RN and mc3 like this.
  3. 3
    Quote from ColleenRN2B
    I'm not so sure. Personally, I think this may be the first wave of nursing students who grew up in the era of "everyone gets a trophy just for showing up" and could do no wrong in the eyes of everyone around them.
    Personal responsibility was not something demanded of them as a child and going through life with the attitude of "my instructor doesn't like me and refuses to teach me" is going to be the trend, I predict.
    Trolls don't typically come around again once they put the match to the pile, this OP did make another appearance---albeit to further "explain" why she was in the right and the school is looking to see her fail....
    Way to generalize a whole generation. I'm 22 and most of my classmates are younger than me. Lateness doesn't happen much in my class. Most of us feel like we worked too hard to get there.
    newhospicern, zoe92, and Luckyyou like this.
  4. 5
    Advice? Grow up. Tardiness is tacky.

    I can't believe you think YOU'RE the victim.
    zoe92, BuckyBadgerRN, GrnTea, and 2 others like this.
  5. 3
    Anyone in my clinical group would be GONE by now if they acted as immature as you have. You are an adult, act like one. Do what your instructor, school and clinical site have told you to do. There's a list of rules that you are supposed to follow. They were laid out for you at orientation. If you don't like them, you should have dropped before the semester started. Someone else who would appreciate your spot could have taken it. I can't help it, I find this type of attitude ridiculous!
  6. 2
    Quote from student1919
    I think I would be fired for being late. The TB test I would have been able to get done at my place of employment so it wouldn't have happened. I didn't know where people get those done. I'm still slightly confused about it. I would probably work night shift so it would be easier to arrive early, and hence solve the issue of being late. We're only given one option for the time of the clinical. I always have a reason for being late, but it doesn't matter unless its something as serious as death. For instance, there was an accident on the part of the highway without a shoulder. I come from a different county on the opposite side of town than everyone else in my clinical, so they didn't run into this issue.
    The rules at my school were: 1 minute late = absence. 3 absences = kicked out for the semester. My classmate and I were headed to clinicals in a snow storm and she lost control. We ended up crashed into a tree. Luckily we weren't seriously hurt and we crashed in front of a house where the owner actually worked in the hospital we were headed to and she offered to give us a ride the rest of the way. We called the instructors prior to start time and told them of the situation but it was still counted as an absence.

    The rules are strict. The rules weed out those that refuse to take the profession seriously. (Thank God)
    wooh and nyteshade like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from student1919
    So, I am on the brink of getting kicked out of my program due to the clinical setting. I arrived late quite a few times and the instructors don't like me or teach me, just reprimand me. I get 80-90% on the exams but it doesn't matter since the instructor can decide to fail you for the smallest reason, such as wearing the wrong color nail polish or being ten minutes late. I already failed one course for that reason. A few days after my grievance over the grade was filed I got an email stating that I'm not allowed to go to clinical the next day because my TB test was overdue so I will probably fail the course, which will be talked about in person. After one F transferring is relatively impossible and the constant meetings make it difficult to accomplish anything other than talking. I was reminded that my test was overdue and asked the status two weeks prior but I was busy writing a few papers and stacking copies of documents for the grievance filing. Does anyone have any advice for me? It would be much appreciated.
    Suggestion:
    Be more proactive.
  8. 1
    Clearly you are smart so be wise and face your current behaviour is not serving you.

    Your best options is to go to your instructors and say "I take responsibility for my behavior. I have reflected on my behaviour and recognize I was not being professional. I am committed to changing and will do whatever it takes to be a nurse. "

    Whether you feel there are favourites is irrelevant because that is how life is as well.

    Being responsible is a huge part of your job description as a nurse you need to begin proving that by
    being big enough to say "I was wrong. I apologise " and hope they will be kind.
    wooh likes this.
  9. 0
    I said "MAY be". Sensitive much? Kudos to you and your classmates for your committment to your education---it'll pay off is aces!!!

    Quote from Miiki
    Way to generalize a whole generation. I'm 22 and most of my classmates are younger than me. Lateness doesn't happen much in my class. Most of us feel like we worked too hard to get there.
  10. 1
    Take ownership. Nothing you have said justifies your actions. Think about the hundreds of diligent students rejected from your nursing program that may be reading this and angry that someone like you was accepted over them into the program .
    BuckyBadgerRN likes this.


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