What's your pick for the perfect nurses watch?

  1. 0 Hi all!

    I'm looking for the perfect nurses watch and could use some help. Perfect for me, means analog, with military time, night light, oversized plate, I can find that easy enough, but I'm struggling to find a watch that I can wear all the time, meaning I don't particularily like the "white band" and am looking for a dressier band.
    So... any ideas, favorites? Big thanks!:spin:
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  3. Visit  MShell profile page

    About MShell

    Joined Oct '06; Posts: 11.

    67 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  SuesquatchRN profile page
    0
    I have this one and I love it. About $35.

    http://www.prestigemed.com/Item257.htm

    [
  5. Visit  justme1972 profile page
    0
    That glow in the dark thing...very important...never thought of that.
  6. Visit  SoundofMusic profile page
    1
    I sort of like those lapel watches. I wonder if those are truly handy to have vs. a wrist watch. My watch just gets wet w/ so much handwashing and I feel it can harbor germs on my arm.
    koreaabc92 likes this.
  7. Visit  IrishIzRN profile page
    0
    I like a cheap wrist watch with military time.

    The lapel ones are a good idea except if you are in a room without a clock on the wall it might be a pain to take a pulse since you won't have the watch somewhere you can see it hands free.
  8. Visit  katiebugg profile page
    0
    Quote from MShell
    Hi all!

    I'm looking for the perfect nurses watch and could use some help. Perfect for me, means analog, with military time, night light, oversized plate, I can find that easy enough, but I'm struggling to find a watch that I can wear all the time, meaning I don't particularily like the "white band" and am looking for a dressier band.
    So... any ideas, favorites? Big thanks!:spin:
    I just received a watch as a gift. I know I will love it. it is the type that you pin on your top (chest) and it is upside down so when you look down at it it is correct. It leaves both of your hands free, the face is easy to read, and it is glow in the dark. I believe it was purchased at nursestation.com for a reasonable price. worth checking out.
  9. Visit  Daytonite profile page
    0
    i've had a lapel watch for years. they are very practical in that it frees your hands up so you can wash them easily and get into all kinds of goo without getting it on the watch.

    this is not a new subject. here are older threads on the issue of nursing wristwatches:

    http://allnurses.com/forums/f8/lapel...es-130988.html
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f50/watc...es-151049.html
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f198/wri...ch-154339.html
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f50/favo...ch-154343.html
  10. Visit  IrishIzRN profile page
    0
    So a couple of questions then since I can't understand how this will work very well....

    Do you pin it low enough that you can see it just by looking down? I'm feeling like it also hang and maybe twist when I'm leaning over or bending down and need to take a pulse. Does this not happen?

    I saw in one of those links somebody asked about isolation gowns...I think she missed the idea that the gloves go over your gown so you can't see your watch on the wrist anyway. So that idea isn't an issue.

    I just use a cheap wrist watch that is plastic. I wear is loose and further up on my arm. So when I wash my hands it's really not getting wet and it's off my hands and really not "catching" anything.

    So the wrist watch for me works because of how I wear it. I had considered a lapel watch when I bought the wrist watch but kept thinking it would be an issue if it flips over.

    Do you pin it right where you might pin a name tag...just about your left breast? You don't put it on the collar...do you?
  11. Visit  WDWpixieRN profile page
    0
    I went to the Timex store and bought one with a gray plastic strap....it has large numbers and good-sized second hand I can see well and also lights up (Indiglo)....I had reviewed quite a few online @ Amazon and felt that was a good, and reasonably-priced, choice.

    I bought it as a second watch as I read stories on here about the "gunk" that can get in a watch and wanted to be able to rinse it off if need be. I wouldn't wear it for everyday due to the germ issue mentioned in another thread, lol....
  12. Visit  Ivana RN-BC profile page
    0
    http://www.lydiasuniforms.com/scrubs...?p_prodid=3449
    This is my favorite watch of all times. I got it 4 years ago, and it still looks like new. It glows in the dark, doesn't matter if you get it wet and the jelly band is soooooo comfortable.
  13. Visit  Daytonite profile page
    2
    Quote from SAHStudent
    So a couple of questions then since I can't understand how this will work very well....

    Do you pin it low enough that you can see it just by looking down? I'm feeling like it also hang and maybe twist when I'm leaning over or bending down and need to take a pulse. Does this not happen?

    I saw in one of those links somebody asked about isolation gowns...I think she missed the idea that the gloves go over your gown so you can't see your watch on the wrist anyway. So that idea isn't an issue.

    I just use a cheap wrist watch that is plastic. I wear is loose and further up on my arm. So when I wash my hands it's really not getting wet and it's off my hands and really not "catching" anything.

    So the wrist watch for me works because of how I wear it. I had considered a lapel watch when I bought the wrist watch but kept thinking it would be an issue if it flips over.

    Do you pin it right where you might pin a name tag...just about your left breast? You don't put it on the collar...do you?
    Your name pin or badge should be worn just below your left collarbone. If the lapel watch hangs from there or a safety pin that you place in that same area, when you look down, you should be able to see the face of the watch. If not, drop the pin down an inch. I could bring my left hand up to tilt the face of the watch upward so I could look at it if I wanted, but it wasn't always necessary. When I had to wear a name badge, the leather strap that my lapel watch was attached to was pinned to the loop that held the clip that clipped the name badge to my uniform. I used to have a larger safety pin attached to the left side of my uniform at the level of my collarbone that I clipped my name badge to. The face of the watch reached just to the bottom of the name badge. To secure it I had a piece of tape across the back of my badge holding the leather strap in place, otherwise, the watch swung around a lot and one time the clasp did manage to work it's way apart and the watch fell off. However, I never had a problem with the face of the watch flipping around so it was hidden. It was probably because the watch is on a leather strap that is about a half inch wide and 3 inches long. Some of the lapel watches that are on chains may flip around, I couldn't say because I've never used one. My school pin was also attached to that plastic loop that held the clip for you to attach your name badge to your uniform, except it was attached to the front of it just below the clip. When I got home and took my name badge off I had to be careful to "set" it down because it was a bit heavy with the watch and my school pin on it.

    If you decide to put a safety pin on a uniform to hold a name badge or a watch, leave it there. Putting it in and taking it out again and again for laundering will damage the fibers of the material and eventually result in holes forming in the fabric. Put a safety pin in once and leave it there. I put the safety pin in on the wrong side of the fabric so only the metal bar was showing to the outside which is where my name tag was attached.

    Isolation rooms should specifically have clocks on the walls with second hands on them for the very reason that the staff have to be gloved and gowned and access to their watches is covered up by their protective equipment. If rooms do not have clocks like this--complain to the managers, write up a maintenance request or follow the procedure necessary to get that situation remedied.

    Kiddo, whatever works for you is what you do. I just liked having the lapel watches. My skin tends to react to some metals anyway and I almost never wear a wristwatch because of this. I worked on a stepdown unit where we had patients with all kinds of nasty drainage coming out of all kinds of orifices: natural and manmade. There were times when we were washing all the way up to our L-bones (elbows). Also, pieces of gauze and some loose strings of the blankets will sometimes get caught on the stem of that little winding wheel on the side of a wristwatch. If you're not aware of it and pull away suddenly, you could damage the watch, not to mention pulling a gauze dressing out of place. I was never concerned about fashion as much as I was about functionality. As long as I showered and put on a clean uniform before I went to work each day, I considered my uniform and things I carried in my pockets or clipped to me to be my "tools".
    CherryRed23 and Circejane like this.
  14. Visit  IrishIzRN profile page
    0
    Quote from Daytonite
    Isolation rooms should specifically have clocks on the walls with second hands on them for the very reason that the staff have to be gloved and gowned and access to their watches is covered up by their protective equipment. If rooms do not have clocks like this--complain to the managers, write up a maintenance request or follow the procedure necessary to get that situation remedied.

    Kiddo, whatever works for you is what you do. I just liked having the lapel watches. My skin tends to react to some metals anyway and I almost never wear a wristwatch because of this. I worked on a stepdown unit where we had patients with all kinds of nasty drainage coming out of all kinds of orifices: natural and manmade. There were times when we were washing all the way up to our L-bones (elbows). Also, pieces of gauze and some loose strings of the blankets will sometimes get caught on the stem of that little winding wheel on the side of a wristwatch. If you're not aware of it and pull away suddenly, you could damage the watch, not to mention pulling a gauze dressing out of place. I was never concerned about fashion as much as I was about functionality. As long as I showered and put on a clean uniform before I went to work each day, I considered my uniform and things I carried in my pockets or clipped to me to be my "tools".

    Would you believe that where I am they just put clocks on rooms. I have been in isolation rooms that do not have clocks. Now I don't know if the entire hospital got clocks but one floor did.

    The wrist watch does work for me. The thing is I was considering a lapel watch back at day 1 but decided against it for the reasons I questioned above. So hearing some of those answers I may pick one up. My mom wanted a stethoscope watch and so I think I will order that (late nurse's week present...NP, CNM) and add on a lapel watch for me. If it doesn't work...oh well no biggie.
  15. Visit  suzy253 profile page
    0
    I'm a sucker for the Swatch watch brand. they're so dependable and last forever. Here is one of the ones (with military time) that I use for work.
    this one I got for about $35 at Jomas shop
    <A href="http://us.st11.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/jomashop_1946_178556318">http://www.jomashop.com/swatch-sqn101.html















    Also just got this Casio one with military time and lights up. It's great as well. Also at Jomas shop.
    <A href="http://us.st11.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/jomashop_1946_115603120">


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