watch with sweeping second hand? - page 3

They are saying we need a watch with a "sweeping second hand" for our clinicals. What is sweeping second hand? Anyone know? Heidi... Read More

  1. by   ynursed
    Quote from morte
    a sweep second hand to me, is one that literally "sweeps" around the face of the watch....in continuous movement, not stopping at each minute mark....and apparently no longer common in the lower price level.
    though you might check out wind up timexs
    That is the correct answer. They are hard to find because most non digital watches with a second hand stop or "tick" at each minute while the sweeping second hand watches do not.

    I found one at Sears http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...0070921x00003j

    Hope that helps!
  2. by   morte
    i have found you cant trust the description, as Elk found, this is used when it doesnt mean what I mean, lol. Best not to buy, sight unseen.....and i know they can be made, i had a battery operated one years ago, lost the darn thing....
  3. by   elkpark
    Yes, everyone else is correct about the specific meaning of a "sweep" second hand -- perhaps what I should have said is that, in my experience, schools of nursing don't care whether or not it's a true "sweep" second hand, they just want a watch that HAS a second hand, any second hand, and not a digital watch (or traditional watch without a second hand).
  4. by   turnforthenurse
    on being accepted to nursing school!

    Basically what everyone else said. I got my watch from a mall kiosk for $20...then I lost it So I bought another one at Target for $14.99. The one from Target is actually a digital watch but it has seconds in the corner (not a sweeping hand, just counts the seconds) and in my opinion that is just as effective.

    Make sure you get one that is waterproof because you will be doing a lot of hand washing! And as others have said, I wouldn't spend a fortune on a watch...save that money for a good stethoscope!
  5. by   FutureMaleOhioNurse
    Thank you very much for the clarification, guys. I clicked on some of your links and finally found one for $40! It's expensive, but it's gonna work. What would I have done without allnurses.com??!!
  6. by   JUPITER19
    What is the difference in telling time b/t a sweeping had and one that second hand that ticks at each second? (Hope that makes sense) There must be some difference if they specify one over the other...just curioius!!

    Me
  7. by   POTR
    Both are technically 'sweep second hands.'

    The OP's course is just specifying ANALOG w/seconds required, instead of digital.

    As for the differences...

    With the exception of the Rolex Tru-Beat (middle 1950's) and some minor manufacturer's "dead beat" models (1 tick per second), mechanical watch movements move the second hand several times a second creating the illusion of continuous movement. How smooth this movement actually is depends on the beat rate of the movement, modern watches generally 'beat' between 5 and 8 times per second.

    Analog quartz watches typically beat 1 time per second, and many have a low battery warning that drops the number of beats to once every other second. Some may have problems with timing repetitive actions (such as pulsations) because they end up counting the watches visible beat.

    Hope that clears it up.
  8. by   HouTx
    You "young whipper-snappers" are so cute! This thread is one of those that make me realize how ancient I am - LOL. I realize that true millenneals don't even wear watches -- no need to because the most accurate time is always available on the cell phone.

    FYI y'all, the reason you will need a visual second hand is because it is used to time pulse & respirations... generally, you will count the number that occur in 30 seconds (X 2) or a full 60 seconds. It is easy to notice when your 30 seconds are up (halfway around dial) and/or 'count' while watching the second hand... not so easy if you are trying to 'do the math' with a digital readout of seconds. After you have had to start over a few times because you lose count - you will understand.

    Rather than buying multiple cheap watches, it would be better to get a better one that will last you for years. Seiko makes a few very durable models - they will last a couple of decades. My fave is a plain old Citizen model (JC Penney for $60.) that has actual numbers big enough to read (12 hour & 24 hour) with day/date & hands that are also big enough to see in a dimly lit room. Not fancy, I've had it for 2 years now & only had to change the battery.

    If you really want to go full bore 'nursey' - go for a pin-on watch like they use in the UK... the dial is upside down so you can easily read it & it doesn't interfere with handwashing at all.
  9. by   JUPITER19
    I get it now, thanks for the info and explanation!!!!

    Me
  10. by   Rocketeer
    I recently bought a watch for nursing school, and the package just says "Japan movement". Is this sweeping second hand? I assume it must be the right kind because it is a jelly band watch that I picked up at Life Uniforms, but I haven't opened it yet in case I need to return it.
  11. by   RNMeg
    I'm a brand-new nurse, and my watch is about as old-school as you can get! I got a pocket watch with a second hand. To me, it seems like the perfect solution. Wrist watches interfere with proper handwashing (if it gets wet under the band, I can just feel the bugs multiplying!) and lapel pin watches are hard for me to read. A pocket watch can be pulled out when I need it, left in my pocket when I don't, and held at a comfortable distance for me to see it clearly.
  12. by   StudentGrace
    I got a Timex indiglo "Expedition" watch. Water resistent and has small military numbers with the slightly larger regular hourly numbers. Maybe $30-35 at Walmart/Target/KMart. Also, Dakota Watch Co typically have kiosks in the mall or you can order online and can get something similar. I like my Timex though and it works for me.
  13. by   elkpark
    Quote from RNMeg
    I'm a brand-new nurse, and my watch is about as old-school as you can get! I got a pocket watch with a second hand. To me, it seems like the perfect solution. Wrist watches interfere with proper handwashing (if it gets wet under the band, I can just feel the bugs multiplying!) and lapel pin watches are hard for me to read. A pocket watch can be pulled out when I need it, left in my pocket when I don't, and held at a comfortable distance for me to see it clearly.
    How do you handle cleaning the watch? Each time you handle the watch to check the time, wash your hands, and then handle the watch again to check the time, you're recontaminating your hand(s) with whatever was on your hands the previous times you've handled the watch. Unless you're cleaning the watch each time you use it, or each time you clean your hands ... (One of the advantages of wrist watches and lapel watches is that you don't have to touch them to use them -- not the case with a pocket watch.)

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