Nursing Scrubs: The Material Makes A Difference

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

21,057 Views | 26 Comments

Nursing scrubs and other types of uniforms designed for healthcare workers are made using different materials. The intended purpose of this article is to discuss how the different types of fabrics make a difference depending on the needs and desires of the wearer.

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    Nursing Scrubs: The Material Makes A Difference

    The vast majority of nursing scrubs are made using blends of polyester and cotton, although some uniforms are 100 percent cotton and others are constructed with 100 percent polyester material. A small number of scrubs are made using blends of other synthetic fabrics such as rayon and spandex.

    Depending on the specific needs and desires of the person who wears the scrubs, the material used to construct them most certainly makes a difference. Above all else, it is important that all nursing scrubs are made to be sturdy enough to endure many wearings, resist different bodily fluids, and stand up to multiple washings.

    Most scrubs sold in stores and online are made with fabric that consists of a polyester and cotton mixture. Uniforms that are made of polyester and cotton are beneficial because they tend to be affordable, dry very quickly in clothes dryers, resist wrinkling, and offer hassle-free care. However, nurses who choose to iron scrubs comprised of this blend of fabrics are strongly advised to use low to moderate heat because high heat might lead to scorching and possible melting as a result of the synthetic polyester components. Popular mixtures include 55 percent polyester blended with 45 percent cotton, and 65 percent polyester blended with 35 percent cotton.

    Many scrubs are constructed with 100 percent cotton fabric. All-cotton uniforms offer benefits that include unsurpassed softness, durability, and virtually no chance of 'seeing through' the clothing articles to reveal embarrassing underwear lines. Keep in mind that 100 percent cotton scrubs may take a little longer to dry, are more prone to wrinkle, and generally cost more than polyester blends.

    Some scrubs are made using 100 percent polyester material. Polyester work clothes are desirable due to their low cost, ability to stretch, resistance to wrinkles after laundering, tendency to rapidly dry, and overall low maintenance. Nurses who prefer to iron polyester scrubs must use low heat at all times because moderate to high heat settings can scorch and melt this synthetic material.

    A handful of newer medical uniforms have incorporated synthetic blends that include spandex and rayon. Cotton/spandex blends are excellent for the wearer who needs some stretch, whereas polyester/rayon mixtures are ideal for strength and cost effectiveness.

    The nurse or other type of healthcare worker who wants to purchase medical scrubs has multiple choices in fabric blends, colors, designs, and cuts. The material used to construct the uniform should be carefully considered prior to making any purchases. Happy shopping!
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Aug 21, '12
    Hygiene Queen, shudva, CallieNM, and 3 others like this.
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  4. About TheCommuter

    TheCommuter is a moderator of allnurses.com and has varied experiences upon which to draw for her articles. She was an LPN/LVN for more than four years prior to becoming a registered nurse.

    TheCommuter joined Feb '05 - from 'Fort Worth, Texas, USA'. Age: 33 TheCommuter has '8' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'acute rehab, long term care, and psych'. Posts: 26,485 Likes: 36,575; Learn more about TheCommuter by visiting their allnursesPage Website


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    26 Comments so far...

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    Quality of stitching matters too. In the past, Dickies would fall apart and all I'll wear now is Cherokee. (Dickies may have improved since I last bought them, not trying to kill a brand that may have got better.)
    TheCommuter likes this.
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    Quote from adnrnstudent
    Quality of stitching matters too. In the past, Dickies would fall apart and all I'll wear now is Cherokee. (Dickies may have improved since I last bought them, not trying to kill a brand that may have got better.)
    I have several top and scrub bottoms made by Cherokee that I purchased back in 2006. They still have not faded or developed any holes after all these years, so I'll give a firsthand testimonial to their quality.
    shudva, SHGR, and adnrnstudent like this.
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    I just bought some scrubs made by Dansko, (on zappos) and they are great. No wrinkles.
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    Quote from DutchRN09
    I just bought some scrubs made by Dansko, (on zappos) and they are great. No wrinkles.
    Many healthcare workers also swear by the quality and comfort of Dansko shoes, especially the clogs. They're a bit pricey, but worth it to many people.
    lisaannjamRN likes this.
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    I wonder about the tightness of the weave required in the OR. Do we need to adhere to that on the floor?
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    Love my Koi pants. Though I am also partial to some scrub pants I get at Walmart for about $12 Scrubs and Beyond maybe? Not so picky about tops as long as they are cute and cover my midback.
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    I forgot walmart sells scrubs. I needed solid navy and wine colored sets for my new job. I tried cherokee work wear core stretch. These are soft and cozy and have a nice feminine fit. I have petite shoulders and most tops are too big for me. These fit just right. And there is still some room in the pants for those of us with thighs and a little junk in the trunk.
    Last edit by NF_eyenurse on Aug 21, '12 : Reason: dumb smart phone
    shudva likes this.
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    I think I'm addicted to scrub shopping. My favorite are the Cherokee flare leg pants with half elastic in the back with a drawstring.
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    This is helpful nursefrances, I an a new lpn student and I have spent hours and hours trying on scrubs. I ordered some online which stated they ran large and the top fit fine, but I couldn't get the bottoms over my rump and hips. I didn't know they even made stretch scrubs. Thank you, I will be on the hunt for those.
    NF_eyenurse and TheCommuter like this.


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