My Feet Hurt

  1. After 7 years of nursing and all the hooks that come with a steady paycheck (buying a home/cars/vacations etc etc), my 36 hour week has become 48-60 hours. And my feet are killing me all the time. Lying in bed, my legs get to me. At work I've taken to wearing TED hose and it's helped a lot. But not enough. Do any of you have any suggestions to take the pain off?

    Thanks in advance.
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  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   underpaidrn
    If where you work allows it, try Sven clogs. They are made by a Swedish orthopedist and are the absolute best for working long hours. I could do 12 hour shifts running up and down the hall all night and my legs would never, ever get tired. They have a website, can't think what it is, but if you Goggle Sven clogs, it should come up with some. They also sell them on Ebay. :spin:
  4. by   SuesquatchRN
    Depends on your feet. The thing that absolutely saved mine are Birkenstock Boston. Worth every penny.
  5. by   UM Review RN
    Crocs saved my feet (and my job).
  6. by   MAISY, RN-ER
    MBT shoes (Masai Barefoot Technology-worth the price)and light support socks are my life savers!
    Maisy
    Last edit by MAISY, RN-ER on Oct 17, '07 : Reason: fogot to add what mbt was
  7. by   regularRN
    [FONT="Comic Sans MS"]I have to agree with the above post - MBTs are expensive, but more than worth it. I never experience foot pain or leg ache when I wear them. I have some other "quality" gym shoes designed for walking that supposedly have gel cushions - they really hurt!
  8. by   mamunsey
    I love the Danskin, expensive, but worth it, have worn them for years!
  9. by   RN1989
    After work, use a golf ball to massage your feet. Put it on the floor with your foot on top of it (sit down for this). Roll the ball under your feet. Try to do it lengthwise from one side of foot to the other side, then horizontally under your foot from toes to heel. The more pressure you can put on the ball, the better it feels later on. It hurt the first few times that I did this but after I was finished with the session - my feet felt better so that I could get up and do what I needed to do at home. Not a permanent fix but it helps.
  10. by   nursingisworkRN
    You may also look for a foot store that makes custom orthotics. They are not too expensive, and many swear by them! To point out the obvious, that is too many hours on your feet! YIKES!
  11. by   lotus31
    A little homeopathic remedy: I used to freeze coke cans and roll them under my feet (with socks on). The coolness felt awesome under my feet and I was getting a free foot massage.

    I've also seen nurses wear a special type of shoes that have springs in the heels. They swear by them. Unfortunately they are super- expensive.
  12. by   bethin
    Quote from lotus31
    A little homeopathic remedy: I used to freeze coke cans and roll them under my feet (with socks on). The coolness felt awesome under my feet and I was getting a free foot massage.

    I've also seen nurses wear a special type of shoes that have springs in the heels. They swear by them. Unfortunately they are super- expensive.
    This is what I do.

    Wouldn't it be nice if hospitals provided healthcare workers with foot massages after every shift or at least on a regular basis? I was in a large hospital in Chicago years ago visiting a friend and in the elevator was posted a sign for employees, "don't forget to sign up for your foot massages!"
  13. by   EmmaG
    Quote from bethin
    This is what I do.

    Wouldn't it be nice if hospitals provided healthcare workers with foot massages after every shift or at least on a regular basis? I was in a large hospital in Chicago years ago visiting a friend and in the elevator was posted a sign for employees, "don't forget to sign up for your foot massages!"
    I'd never leave work!

  14. by   EmmaG
    Memorial Hospital in Chattanooga, Tenn., looked at massage therapy as a component of healing. "We wanted our work environment to be more conducive to relaxation in order to take the edge off of the hectic pace in a hospital environment," says Tracy Smith, Wellspring program coordinator for the hospital. "We wanted our hospital to be as sensitive to the needs of our 2,000 employees as we were to needs of patients."


    While looking for a way to help reduce stress for their personnel. Memorial realized that one of the biggest problems was that many employees could not take off 30 to 40 minutes or longer to go someplace and relax. "Nurses, in particular, have a difficult time coming off the floors even for classes or lunch." Smith says. "That's why having a massage therapist come to them right where they work seemed like a wonderful way to give them a break and help them reduce stress."

    The typical on-site masssage is performed in a portable "chair," which places the employee in a sitting position, leaning forward. No clothing is removed and no privacy is required for the massage.


    Therapists can set up just about any place that is convenient for the employees and the company. Memorial even has a massage chair in the emergency room.
    The typical chair massage lasts from 10 to 20 minutes, "about the same amount of time an employee would take for a cigarette break," says Robin Egal, president of New York-based Back to Work Inc., a company that provides massage therapists for businesses. "The employee gets a neck and shoulder massage without having to leave the building. You don't have to do anything but come in, sit down and relax. So, there's not much wasted time."


    Smith finds that hospital employees work together to arrange time for the massages. "They cover for each other so they can take advantage of this service. It's worth it to them to find the time to help each other."
    I think I just found my next assignment

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