So I didn't fully tell the truth about my resume... background check??? HELP!!!

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    The new hospital AA offered me a job and doing a background check. But during the time of interview at AA I only had 4 weeks of working at BB Hospital and I did not put BB Hospital on my RESUME. I was currently taking all classes for BB's orientation because I just started. So I didn't feel the need to update my resume for the Nurse recruiter at AA because I had not had any clinical experience yet at BB. So I disclosed this and when they asked me if I had any experience I said no...

    Now, I have a background check at AA with HR. Will they find out that I am currently working at BB? It's only been two months with BB... I was going to tell HR at AA but they want to call my current employer, etc... so I feel like I should just leave this off... because if they call my current employer they might not like the fact that they are orienting me and I am moving to a new hospital? So they could fire me right? Becuase although AA offered me a job it is not 100% yet.

    I don't have any criminal record or anything and my current work place is good but I feel that I want to retire at the hospital I recieved my new offer at because I am a new grad.
    Last edit by kobebryant on Dec 13, '12
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  3. 30 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Odds are the new employer won't know about, or call, your current employer since they aren't listed on your application. The main things that get people in trouble on applications are fabricating experience (saying you worked somewhere you didn't, claiming experience in a field you have never worked in, etc.), fabricating credentials or lying about having a valid license, lying about discipline/suspension against your license, lying about a having criminal record (telling an employer you don't have one if you do) and things of that nature.

    It seems premature to decide that you want to retire at a place before you even start working there. Having been in the profession as long as I have, I have seen a lot of changes. I have been on duty when two places changed owners, and I had one facility closed out from under me (I discharged the last patient who left before we closed). Nothing is certain in the health care industry. Keep your mind open to other opportunities as they unfold.
  5. 0
    Thanks a lot! So they won't even know I am working there if they run my background check with my social security? They ask for all my living address, etc. I just am terrified I will not be offered the position because on the form it says, that I have to be honest... so I was going to say I currently work there but I just really don't want to risk the current employer knowing... But if you feel it would not be a problem then I think I won't tell AA that I am currently working at BB.
  6. 14
    Wait-- you accepted and started a job and almost immediately interviewed somewhere else?? This is NOT about your resume. It's about your honor. What part of, "We offer you a job." "Thank you, I'll take it. When's my start date?" don't you understand? When you accept employment you should have the maturity to stay there unless there's actual fraud or really baad (as in, bad enough to report to the state) conditions.

    Life is full of "If onlys" and this is what happens when you can't delay gratification or don't really know what you want. Too bad.

    So Orca's right that it probably won't be on a background check...but you should NOT be surprised if the news gets back to BB that you have gone to AA after BB has spent time and money orienting you (and yes, this time "counts" even if it's inconvenient for you to think so. You were employed.). Someday down the road you will find yourself face to face with somebody who was really inconvenienced by this little trick, and then you'll find out the meaning of "what goes around, comes around."

    My recommendation? Be a grown-up, stay for a year at the place where you already accepted a job, finish your orientation, and do your very best to be a good nurse there. You might find you learn something and like it better than you think. Of course if you go to AA and then decide you don't like it there either ("the grass is always greener" syndrome) then you can always go back to apply to BB ... and they will probably spit in yer eye, you job-hopper, you. Then you will have NO job and two places that will never hire you again. Think about it.
    JMart83, Meriwhen, Katie71275, and 11 others like this.
  7. 4
    Yes the current employer won't be happy, but we live in an "at will" employment world where we can quit at any time and they can fire us at any time so if she gets a better offer she can take it. If she wants this other job she will have to take the risk of burning bridges and ******* off the current employer. It's up to her to make that decision. Besides there are plenty of new grads out there begging for jobs so they should be able to fill her spot! That's life!
    i<3u, sharonp30, Nrsasrus, and 1 other like this.
  8. 5
    GrnTea makes a very good point. Even if Hospital B doesn't find out about Hospital A, burning your bridges with A might not be the best course. Health care managers network far more than people realize, and if word gets around that you ditched one employer during orientation for another, when you need another job - and you inevitably will - it may become far more difficult.

    Employees who left my current employer under less-than-ideal conditions don't realize that informal conversations I have had with would-be employers have cost them jobs. They did not list me as a reference, but as the nurse manager at my facility I get more calls than people realize asking me about former employees (especially if I would re-hire them).
    salvadordolly, elkpark, Orange Tree, and 2 others like this.
  9. 5
    If these two facilities are both somewhat close to one another there is a fair chance that at some time in the future you will get busted on this lie, sooner or later. What you will realize fairly early on in your career is that nursing is a fairly close-knit community and everyone knows someone who worked someplace with everyone else. Word gets around!
  10. 4
    Quote from GrnTea

    My recommendation? Be a grown-up, stay for a year at the place where you already accepted a job, finish your orientation, and do your very best to be a good nurse there. You might find you learn something and like it better than you think. Of course if you go to AA and then decide you don't like it there either ("the grass is always greener" syndrome) then you can always go back to apply to BB ... and they will probably spit in yer eye, you job-hopper, you. Then you will have NO job and two places that will never hire you again. Think about it.
    This! Why accept a job offer if you weren't planning on staying there? I just don't get it. I have a friend that did this also and it bothers me as it goes with the whole why managers don't want to hire new grads because they know they'll leave as soon a they find something better. I don't know, I wouldn't apply to and accept a job I wasn't going to commit to. I get maybe 6-9 months later and finding its not a good fit but that's irritating.
    imintrouble, joanna73, GrnTea, and 1 other like this.
  11. 2
    Leaving during orientation may land you in the "do not rehire" list. This could be a problem or maybe not. Larger healthcare systems do buy smaller ones or those in financial trouble do merge. This is something we all need to think about when leaving. Know your current hospital's policy, give proper notice; not so much for them but for yourself in the future. We don't have a crystal ball and things change meaning you may deal with them in the future.

    I do wish you luck and leaving is a personal decision.
    RNsophia and HouTx like this.
  12. 5
    If you received a paycheck from the hospital where you are currently on orientation there is a chance it will show up on your credit report or background check. I think this is poor career planning though unless there is some blatant reason you need to leave on orientation. I agree that you should stay on at the first employer, They have already invested the time and money on orientation and took a chance on you in this market. It goes both ways....we want empolyers to treat us well...we need to treat them well too and honor our obligations.
    Last edit by iluvivt on Dec 14, '12 : Reason: spelling
    salvadordolly, llg, imintrouble, and 2 others like this.


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