Bad resumes/good resumes *rant* - page 3

by mclennan, BSN, RN | 12,070 Views | 56 Comments

I'm assisting with hiring a new case manager RN and would like to vent about the HORRIBLE quality resumes I am seeing in the mile high stack we're reading through. #1 problem: basic spelling, grammar, punctuation and command... Read More


  1. 3
    I'm a new GN and have only had a couple of interviews so far. However, I've been in Corporate America for a good many years, and I've been on hiring committees many times.

    I applaud people who set a higher requirement for resumes. I *do* think that throwing out a resume with a single typo is a bit excessive, depending on the typo. Some typos should be glaring to anyone with a command of the language. Some are subtle and harder to ferret out.

    Bottom line, if you're preparing a resume, have it looked at by as many people as possible - preferably people who can tell if the content appropriate, and also be nit-picky about spelling and grammar. I'm affectionately known among my friends as a grammar geek and have cheerfully spent evenings debating the worth of the Oxford Comma. Typos and errors STILL slip by me when I've been looking at a document forever. That's why I have friends who are ALSO grammar geeks - well, that and to have someone to debate the Oxford Comma with!!
    Last edit by theantichick on Jan 2, '13 : Reason: fix grammatical error since it's that kind of thread. :)
  2. 0
    If we want to gain more respect as a profession, we need to appear as professionals in all aspects. Kudos to you for taking this approach!
  3. 3
    I'm in the team where ONE typo does not = ONE patient demise/mistake. I've met some honest to goodness GENIUS people in my life and they had poor spelling and grammar. Did they proofread emails and important paperwork? Oh yes, they did. And the very, very cautious ones knew to get more than one person to do it. But I guarantee you, each and every post here so far probably has some minor error in syntax, etc.

    Nowe if theRE resumay lookz like this:

    F, Machine RN
    TooMuchJellyinMyBottom@ihatepeople.com

    Pass! But one typo may be precluding an excellent candidate!
  4. 5
    Is it really so much to expect someone to proofread their resume? Then proofread it again. And perhaps get someone else to look it over. While perfect grammar might be a bit high of an expectation for someone not applying to be an editor or proofreader, typos shouldn't be on a resume. You're applying for a job. No, you don't have to be perfect. But be careful with how you present yourself, especially when you have plenty of time to prepare that presentation.
  5. 3
    Quote from FlorenceNtheMachine
    I'm in the team where ONE typo does not = ONE patient demise/mistake. I've met some honest to goodness GENIUS people in my life and they had poor spelling and grammar. Did they proofread emails and important paperwork? Oh yes, they did. And the very, very cautious ones knew to get more than one person to do it. But I guarantee you, each and every post here so far probably has some minor error in syntax, etc. Nowe if theRE resumay lookz like this: F, Machine RNTooMuchJellyinMyBottom@ihatepeople.comPass! But one typo may be precluding an excellent candidate!
    Nicely put; er, well done; er, nicely said? I can't decide now! Should it be hyphenated? Nonetheless.... great approach.
  6. 1
    Quote from FlorenceNtheMachine
    But I guarantee you, each and every post here so far probably has some minor error in syntax, etc.
    Acceptable in something that's casually written. But I hope most people put more thought into their resume, since it's the first impression a potential employer will have, than into a quickly prepared post on the internet. If they're only willing to put in minimal effort to get the job, there's plenty of people who are willing to work harder (and proofread) to get most jobs.
    elkpark likes this.
  7. 1
    Agreed, but I didn't come to the defense of those who put forth minimal effort. But those resumes with very minimal errors/typos, maybe look past them and see the big picture, you know?

    Will this person bring 15+ years of relevant experience to our workplace? Are they strongly involved in the community and get along with the pt population?
    Am I willing to meet them and see how we get along in person?
    BostonTerrierLoverRN likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from sweetpeamax1206
    Thank you all for the updates on the resumes. I am a recent graduate from a ADN program and I am currently working in a non-medical field and have manager experience, however, I have not taken my NCLEX yet as I am waiting for my school to finalize the paperwork to do so. I have applied for a couple of jobs at the hospital that I did most of my rotations at and I was rejected right away online. I am not sure how to make myself more presentable. I have a Bachelors in communication and now a ADN, but I feel lost in this process and discouraged. I really want to work at the hospital where I did my clinicals, but not sure what is appropriate to get noticed. I even emailed my old instructor who is a manager on the floor I would like to work. Any suggestions from those who read resumes, what are you looking for if I do not have experience per se. Thank you
    I'm going to venture a guess in that the MOST LIKELY reason for all the automatic rejects is that you are applying for a licensed nursing position and you are not able to complete the field with a current, active nursing license as you have not yet taken the NCLEX. In searching some of the major medical centers websites in my area it clearly states that applications without the minimum requirements (i.e. an active nursing license) will be automatically rejected and that only online applications are accepted per current policy.

    First, stop applying (online) for now so that you aren't prevented from reapplying for positions once you get your license (some systems prevent duplicate applications). If an application can be submitted via fax, in person, or via email whereby you can submit a resume stating license pending with the state of X and you can emphasize your clinical rotations at the facility then by all means apply.

    Work on preparing your resume and studying for the NCLEX. Hopefully you are in a state that passing the NCLEX is the last step in licensing and your license will be posted shortly after you pass the NCLEX.

    Good luck.
  9. 1
    Quote from BostonTerrierLoverRN
    Ironic (support post errors)

    I wrote most of my friend's resumes for them, along with several others who got wind I could compose them well. I doubt your even getting "that" person's work.

    I agree with, and applaud you for your time and consideration to help AN members with your pearls of wisdom- but the admitted reactions are what I find shocking.
    Your friend wrote more than one resume? And your friend has a multiple personality disorder?

    (That would be "...my friends' resumes for them..." or "..my friend's resumes (or resume, if you only did one) for him..."

    Also, one does not properly capitalize "high school diploma" or "resume" (an earlier post).

    ::sigh::
    Last edit by GrnTea on Jan 2, '13
    BostonTerrierLoverRN likes this.
  10. 1
    Quote from savoytruffle
    I helped the inservice coordinator review applications for our CNA class one time. She would immediately toss any applications filled out online. She said "they were too lazy to come in and fill it out in person". I was appalled and did not help her ever again. That's what we have the online application for! To drum up more of an applicant pool. I feel that one should save the judgement until I see and speak with an applicant. LPN and RN associate degree programs do not go into depth teaching good writing skills, and I feel experience and professionalism count. I've worked with too many educated jerks to think that perfect grammar will make a good nurse.
    In US punctuation, the period is enclosed in the quotation marks. "... fill out in person."
    "To drum up" is a reference to the time when drums sounding on the town green brought out the militia. One can therefore drum up more applicants, but cannot drum up a pool.
    strawberryluv likes this.


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