Bad resumes/good resumes *rant* - page 3

I'm assisting with hiring a new case manager RN and would like to vent about the HORRIBLE quality resumes I am seeing in the mile high stack we're reading through. #1 problem: basic spelling,... Read More

  1. Visit  FlorenceNtheMachine} profile page
    1
    Agreed, but I didn't come to the defense of those who put forth minimal effort. But those resumes with very minimal errors/typos, maybe look past them and see the big picture, you know?

    Will this person bring 15+ years of relevant experience to our workplace? Are they strongly involved in the community and get along with the pt population?
    Am I willing to meet them and see how we get along in person?
    BostonTerrierLoverRN likes this.
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  3. Visit  JustBeachyNurse} profile page
    0
    Quote from sweetpeamax1206
    Thank you all for the updates on the resumes. I am a recent graduate from a ADN program and I am currently working in a non-medical field and have manager experience, however, I have not taken my NCLEX yet as I am waiting for my school to finalize the paperwork to do so. I have applied for a couple of jobs at the hospital that I did most of my rotations at and I was rejected right away online. I am not sure how to make myself more presentable. I have a Bachelors in communication and now a ADN, but I feel lost in this process and discouraged. I really want to work at the hospital where I did my clinicals, but not sure what is appropriate to get noticed. I even emailed my old instructor who is a manager on the floor I would like to work. Any suggestions from those who read resumes, what are you looking for if I do not have experience per se. Thank you
    I'm going to venture a guess in that the MOST LIKELY reason for all the automatic rejects is that you are applying for a licensed nursing position and you are not able to complete the field with a current, active nursing license as you have not yet taken the NCLEX. In searching some of the major medical centers websites in my area it clearly states that applications without the minimum requirements (i.e. an active nursing license) will be automatically rejected and that only online applications are accepted per current policy.

    First, stop applying (online) for now so that you aren't prevented from reapplying for positions once you get your license (some systems prevent duplicate applications). If an application can be submitted via fax, in person, or via email whereby you can submit a resume stating license pending with the state of X and you can emphasize your clinical rotations at the facility then by all means apply.

    Work on preparing your resume and studying for the NCLEX. Hopefully you are in a state that passing the NCLEX is the last step in licensing and your license will be posted shortly after you pass the NCLEX.

    Good luck.
  4. Visit  GrnTea} profile page
    1
    Quote from BostonTerrierLoverRN
    Ironic (support post errors)

    I wrote most of my friend's resumes for them, along with several others who got wind I could compose them well. I doubt your even getting "that" person's work.

    I agree with, and applaud you for your time and consideration to help AN members with your pearls of wisdom- but the admitted reactions are what I find shocking.
    Your friend wrote more than one resume? And your friend has a multiple personality disorder?

    (That would be "...my friends' resumes for them..." or "..my friend's resumes (or resume, if you only did one) for him..."

    Also, one does not properly capitalize "high school diploma" or "resume" (an earlier post).

    ::sigh::
    Last edit by GrnTea on Jan 2, '13
    BostonTerrierLoverRN likes this.
  5. Visit  GrnTea} profile page
    1
    Quote from savoytruffle
    I helped the inservice coordinator review applications for our CNA class one time. She would immediately toss any applications filled out online. She said "they were too lazy to come in and fill it out in person". I was appalled and did not help her ever again. That's what we have the online application for! To drum up more of an applicant pool. I feel that one should save the judgement until I see and speak with an applicant. LPN and RN associate degree programs do not go into depth teaching good writing skills, and I feel experience and professionalism count. I've worked with too many educated jerks to think that perfect grammar will make a good nurse.
    In US punctuation, the period is enclosed in the quotation marks. "... fill out in person."
    "To drum up" is a reference to the time when drums sounding on the town green brought out the militia. One can therefore drum up more applicants, but cannot drum up a pool.
    strawberryluv likes this.
  6. Visit  GrnTea} profile page
    0
    Quote from amygarside
    It can really be frustrating to see that resumes are done haphazardly. It can make you think twice about hiring this applicants because if they are not careful about the resume they send, how can they be careful about taking care of the patients.
    "... these applicants ... the resumes they send .... "

    However, if you have meant to write "this applicant," you must correct the rest of your sentence to read, "this applicant, because if he is not careful about the resume he sends, how can he be careful about ..."

    Plural : plural; singular : singular.
  7. Visit  llg} profile page
    6
    I'm in the "middle of the road" on this one. I can understand the ocassional typo, grammar error, etc. ... and think it foolish to not consider an otherwise strong candidate who made 1 or 2 little mistakes in writing. BUT, I feel strongly that the people whose resumes demonstrate that they are either careless or lack the ability to comminicate in written English are giving a bad impression of themselves -- and I don't want to hire them. We need to set and maintain higher standards for the nursing profession.

    When you are getting dozens (in some cases, hundreds) of applications for each open position, there is no way that each applicant can be interviewed. You have to have some criteria to do that initial screening to get the applicant pool down to a managable size. People who can't take the time or make the effort to write a decent resume make easy targets.

    I don't understand why a job seeker would NOT want to use their resume to make a positive impression. If your writing skills are weak, get some help. It's a reasonable expectation that everyone should be able to meet. Those who don't bother to meet it are "asking" to be eliminated early in the competition for the job. I don't want to hire anyone who doesn't have enough common sense to realize that.
    GerberaDaisy, amoLucia, Meriwhen, and 3 others like this.
  8. Visit  BostonTerrierLoverRN} profile page
    5
    @GrnTea, I would cry at my grammatical failures, but I'm already in an emotional drought, I love you all, and hope you meet your hiring needs!

    I'm off to remedial English training secondary to poorly paid "Southern US Rural School Teachers(with too many students)" (I didn't even proofread this post by the way. So rip it apart, just don't expect me to hurt- you can't can't get blood from a turnip)*

    I think I am the only one in the whole thread who admitted being imperfect, especially now. I am just glad I didn't have MORE errors!!!

    Actually, I did have to do more than one resume for the friend in question (friend's), because she wasn't willing to work Sundays. Her husband was a Minister, and I was just the resume slave. The rest of the grammar I butchered, Lol!!

    *(hukt en foniks pheld mee!!) ...and so did Apple's spell and grammar check!!!!
    Last edit by BostonTerrierLoverRN on Jan 2, '13 : Reason: Wanted a smiley face
    Orion81, GrnTea, AcadianOfMaineNP, and 2 others like this.
  9. Visit  Orion81} profile page
    1
    Quote from GrnTea
    In US punctuation, the period is enclosed in the quotation marks. "... fill out in person." "To drum up" is a reference to the time when drums sounding on the town green brought out the militia. One can therefore drum up more applicants, but cannot drum up a pool.
    The period does NOT always fall within the quotation marks. So if you are going to judge, get your facts straight. Sheesh, who the heck cares about little grammar and spelling mistakes on an online forum?! Enough with the nonsense. Again, multiple mistakes on a resume = forget about it. ONE minor error, I will give you a chance if the quality is great. The OP stated "one typo". Ridiculous. Note the period correctly placed AFTER the quotation mark.
    BostonTerrierLoverRN likes this.
  10. Visit  Orion81} profile page
    0
    Quote from GrnTea
    Your friend wrote more than one resume? And your friend has a multiple personality disorder?(That would be "...my friends' resumes for them..." or "..my friend's resumes (or resume, if you only did one) for him..."Also, one does not properly capitalize "high school diploma" or "resume" (an earlier post). ::sigh::
    OK, I admit. This DID make me giggle.
  11. Visit  elkpark} profile page
    1
    I agree completely with llg (as usual ). While I wouldn't drop someone otherwise well-qualified from consideration because of one typo on a resume', if it is a more significant problem than that I have to wonder about the individual's general judgment and work ethic.
    BostonTerrierLoverRN likes this.
  12. Visit  GrnTea} profile page
    0
    Quote from Orion81
    The period does NOT always fall within the quotation marks. So if you are going to judge, get your facts straight. Sheesh, who the heck cares about little grammar and spelling mistakes on an online forum?! Enough with the nonsense. Again, multiple mistakes on a resume = forget about it. ONE minor error, I will give you a chance if the quality is great. The OP stated "one typo". Ridiculous. Note the period correctly placed AFTER the quotation mark.


    Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, 2003. Periods and commas precede closing quotation marks, whether double or single. This is a traditional style, in use well before the first edition of this manual (1906). As nicely expressed in William Strunk, Jr. and E.B. White's Elements of Style, "Typographical usage dictates that the comma be inside the [quotation] marks, though logically it often seems not to belong there" (p. 36, see bibliog. 1.1). ...


    The Associated Press Guide to Punctuation, 2003. Commas and periods always go inside quotation marks, although they can be replaced on that spot by an exclamation point or question mark. Normally, these two, as well as the dash and the semicolon, go outside the quotation unless they are part of the quoted statement. Didn't Shakespeare have Mark Antony say, "I have come to bury Caesar, not to praise him"? (Outside, because the question mark applies to the whole sentence.)
    Gertrude Stein once asked, "What is the question?" (Inside; part of the quote.)

  13. Visit  Esme12} profile page
    3
    The topic of this thread is the unprofessional nature of the resumes that are being submitted and in their personal opinion what needs to be done to improve the submitters chance of getting a job.

    I'm not to much the grammar police here on AN as we host nurses from all over the world that come here and must speak English and with the use of smart phones....that auto-correct to some unusual sentences that are not always correct...and the difficulty in texting and using proper punctuation. I don't' let it bug me until the use of txt speak...which is a violation of the TOS.

    Lets stick to the subject of the thread which is the quality of resumes we have seen sent in for consideration for a position and not a lesson in English and grammar....
  14. Visit  barnstormin'} profile page
    2
    Thank goodness for Esme12, the voice of reason.
    Esme12 and BostonTerrierLoverRN like this.


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