Will they contact State Board Will they contact State Board - pg.2 | allnurses

Will they contact State Board - page 2

My friend was fired today because she gave a patient her order of NPH insulin and held the patients Regular insulin for the AM dose. The patients blood sugar was 121, so the patient wanted Reg held.... Read More

  1. Visit  MunoRN profile page
    #13 3
    Quote from LadyFree28
    if she was going to hold, she needed to call the provider. This patient may need her basal rate constant; holding the regular can rebound the patients sugar into a higher amount, resulting in a higher dose of Regular insulin.

    She may have been fired for not collaborating with the provider, hence practicing our side her scope in some instances
    The Nurse wasn't holding the med, the patient was refusing the med, in the view of a BON those are two very different things. Policies when a patient refuses a med, in terms of notifying the provider, are facility specific and there is no blanket rule on this that a BON enforces.
  2. Visit  chinadoll1 profile page
    #14 0
    Quote from MunoRN
    It's completely possible for a diabetic's sugar to drop that much after NPH, particularly a "brittle" diabetic, so there's really no way to assume that the wrong med was given, and therefore nothing to report. Even if it was a known med error, med errors aren't typically reported to the BON unless there was negligence involved. Best practice these days is to deal with med errors non-punitively and to search for ways to prevent it in the future. (Bar code scanning).
    Ok, so they can't do anything to her license then? I told her that being fired, which she shouldn't have been, was more than enough punishment! Then 1 of our friends said she had to let future jobs know she was fired for this and the board will maybe suspend her license temp or make her do refresher courses. Do you think this is true?
  3. Visit  hope3456 profile page
    #15 1
    Does your facility have a policy for what happens if an error is made? If every nurse was fired for errors such as this and then "blacklisted" by the state board - we wouldn't have any nurses! Sounds pretty fishy to me. But as stated earlier, if you are in a RTW state you can be fired for anything or nothing at all.

    And I agree that med errors should be dealt with non punitively. We have all made mistakes - I am so sorry to hear this. It doesn't even sound like she did anything wrong.
  4. Visit  MunoRN profile page
    #16 0
    Quote from chinadoll1
    Ok, so they can't do anything to her license then? I told her that being fired, which she shouldn't have been, was more than enough punishment! Then 1 of our friends said she had to let future jobs know she was fired for this and the board will maybe suspend her license temp or make her do refresher courses. Do you think this is true?
    Only the BON can say if anything will or won't happen to her license, and the BON can do pretty much whatever the want, but in general, a single med error without willful disregard or gross negligence does not result in action against your license or really any sort of action by the BON.
  5. Visit  chinadoll1 profile page
    #17 1
    Quote from hope3456
    Does your facility have a policy for what happens if an error is made? If every nurse was fired for errors such as this and then "blacklisted" by the state board - we wouldn't have any nurses! Sounds pretty fishy to me. But as stated earlier, if you are in a RTW state you can be fired for anything or nothing at all.

    And I agree that med errors should be dealt with non punitively. We have all made mistakes - I am so sorry to hear this. It doesn't even sound like she did anything wrong.
    I'm not sure about the policies because its a jail. Anything prob goes there. And your right, I don't think she did anything wrong either! I think they were just trying to find a way to fire her. Yes the BS dropped, but that doesn't mean she didn't give NPH! Yes we had to call EMS because in jail, if BS go to 20's then we have to call, but he was given D-50, and was fine. But like you said, it sounds fishy to me also!
  6. Visit  chinadoll1 profile page
    #18 0
    Quote from MunoRN

    Only the BON can say if anything will or won't happen to her license, and the BON can do pretty much whatever the want, but in general, a single med error without willful disregard or gross negligence does not result in action against your license or really any sort of action by the BON.
    Ok. We work at the jail, so when her BS went to 20's, then we had to call EMS, so they could give IV D-50, then she was fine. So I hope they don't call state on her for this. Just wouldn't make since! Firing her was enough and unjust if you ask me
  7. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    #19 0
    Merged threads
  8. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    #20 1
    Quote from chinadoll1
    Ok, so they can't do anything to her license then? I told her that being fired, which she shouldn't have been, was more than enough punishment! Then 1 of our friends said she had to let future jobs know she was fired for this and the board will maybe suspend her license temp or make her do refresher courses. Do you think this is true?
    The board can do whatever they like....yes they can restrict her license...they can suspend her license...they can make her take courses.....so yes that is all true.....it depends on what they find on the investigation IF there is an investigation. They may or may not report your friend.

    You don't necessarily have to say that you were fired.....but you have to say that you might not be up for re-hire. some applications will ask if you have been fired. and you need to tell the truth.
  9. Visit  dishes profile page
    #21 3
    I don't think the problem is a medication error, I think the problem is the employer thinks the nurse is lying about the dose and type of insulin. Lying is considered wilful misconduct, instead of warning her, they terminated her for cause. Employers are obligated to report termination for cause to the BON because it is part of protecting the public.
  10. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    #22 0
    Quote from MunoRN

    The Nurse wasn't holding the med, the patient was refusing the med, in the view of a BON those are two very different things. Policies when a patient refuses a med, in terms of notifying the provider, are facility specific and there is no blanket rule on this that a BON enforces.
    I realized that...hence the "if" statement.

    I read this between post work and sleep.
  11. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    #23 2
    Quote from dishes
    I don't think the problem is a medication error, I think the problem is the employer thinks the nurse is lying about the dose and type of insulin. Lying is considered wilful misconduct, instead of warning her, they terminated her for cause. Employers are obligated to report termination for cause to the BON because it is part of protecting the public.
    Now this makes sense...since we were not there, the whole 12 v. 19 units and writing it down for 19 units and NOT the 12 made me confused when I read this post (with one eye open, lol) last night; maybe a little suspicious...no offense, I totally understand how insulins can get mixed up, etc; however, since we don't know the whole story, who's to say what REALLY happened???

    Like I said in my post OP, if she has malpractice insurance, call the provider, your friends needs to read up on the nurse practice act, etc...

    Lesson Learned: HAVE MALPRACTICE INSURANCE.
  12. Visit  cardiacrocks profile page
    #24 0
    Something about this post just doesn't seem right to me at all. I'm sensing some red flags here. First of all, why would she have to give regular insulin to someone with a BS of 121, usually when you give NPH the regular would be on a sliding scale and it would be held d/t the BS being 121. I agree with another poster, if this is a brittle diabetic and from what I am reading I'm going to assume it is, then the BS can drop at anytime for no reason at all. Secondly, people are mixing something up, she didn't give 12 units she gave 19 units, and I will assume she was probably very nervous when questioned and mixed patients up. If she has a lot of inmates to deal with I can see how that might have happened, especially when you are nervous. I'm not saying it would happen to me, but I'm not her, but I can see how it would happen. I'm curious when the last dose of NPH and regular insulin were given, also what time where these meds given, there are still so many questions unanswered. I can not make a judgement based on just the information given here. Anyhow, the patient in question is okay, they followed protocol and gave D5. That's why something just doesn't sound right, sounds to me like they wanted her fired. I'd get an attorney and fight this, I hope she documented this really well for her sake.
  13. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    #25 1
    I keep coming back to this thread, for some reason

    I'm going to break down the OP's original post, and just interpret it, solely based on nursing judgement and opinion.



    My friend was fired today because she gave a patient her order of NPH insulin and held the patients Regular insulin for the AM dose.
    This makes me believe that the patient's order is for Regular/NPH; hence, the order could have been clarified by the provider, and the concerns of the patient should have been addressed; the use of SBAR and documentation could have addressed this.

    [QUOTE]The patients blood sugar was 121, so the patient wanted Reg held. About 2hrs later the patients blood sugars dropped to 55, then to 22. So patient was given protocol treatment for low insulin. [QUOTE]

    OK. What were the first interventions when the blood sugar dropped the first time? What was documented?

    Those are my questions.


    Anyways, my friend was fired over the situation, but do they call State Board and notify them of the incident? Will her license be in jeopardy of this, because our job sad she probably gave Reg instead of NPH accidentally?
    What trail or supporting documents does the facility have in making this decision? If they think that she is not totally honest in her interpretation that happened, then there was cause for her being fired, unfortunately, and if they choose to report the friend to the BON, they may have a cause...they may not; it can go either way.

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