Why cannot give IV medication via artery? - page 3

Hi, I'm new here, please help me to answer the above question. It's looks like stupid question but it bothers my mind.:banghead: I have been searching the answer from internet but I unable to get a good answer. :zzzzz What I... Read More

  1. 0
    Thank you!
    :1luvu:
    :clphnds:
    Last edit by suizzz on Aug 8, '09

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 0
    I think I should change the question.
    :smiley_ab
    Let say there is a patient with arterial line for ABP monitoring, what will happen if you administer medication to arterial line?
  3. 5
    Quote from work&play
    IntraVENUS???? Go back to your A&P book and read the difference between artery and vein. Tissue type, oxigen, direction of blood flow.
    Really? Why don't you go back to your medical dictionary and learn how to spell.

    Geez, can people ask a question without smart remarks. The OP knows what IV stands for. S/he wants to know why veins are the preferred site than an artery and it's quite apparent that those who answered 'because IV stands for intravenous' don't know themselves.

    Thanks for all those who explained the real reason(s) why arteries aren't used. I knew at least one reason, suspected anohter, but learned a lot more.

    I love these types of threads. Sometimes it's the newbies that teach us a thing or two.
    sweetf, carolinapooh, Ivanna_Nurse, and 2 others like this.
  4. 1
    Quote from Otessa
    I have NEVER heard of instilling any meds into the artery-I used to work in a trauma ICU-maybe things have changed.

    otessa
    Some chemos are given that way.
    suizzz likes this.
  5. 1
    Quote from MedSurgeMess
    only someone who uses IV access for recreational use could come up with an answer like that :chuckle
    Actually, I prefer Intraosseous.
    suizzz likes this.
  6. 1
    Quote from caroladybelle
    Some chemos are given that way.

    Just found that out today. This doesn't sound like a common practice though.....
    suizzz likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from zahryia
    Really? Why don't you go back to your medical dictionary and learn how to spell.

    Geez, can people ask a question without smart remarks. The OP knows what IV stands for. S/he wants to know why veins are the preferred site than an artery and it's quite apparent that those who answered 'because IV stands for intravenous' don't know themselves.

    Thanks for all those who explained the real reason(s) why arteries aren't used. I knew at least one reason, suspected anohter, but learned a lot more.

    I love these types of threads. Sometimes it's the newbies that teach us a thing or two.
    I have to say I wasn't being sarcastic or "smart" in my response when I stated IV stands for intravenous-there have been one too many times when a new nurse or student asks a question and truly doesn't know what an abbreviations or acronym truly means.

    I once had a student nurse say that TKO meant "total knockout" and she was dead serious......

    I assume nothing.
    leslie :-D likes this.
  8. 0
    Thank you!
    :1luvu::1luvu::1luvu:
  9. 0
    Thanks for asking this question and for those who provided some valuable insight. As an intern I nearly made the mistake of pushing a drug via an art line. Luckily I was cautious enough to double check with my preceptor who caught my error before I pushed the drug. It was a brain fart on my part because I was thinking it was a central line port.

    Since then I have wanted to know exactly WHY an art line should never be used to push meds. It was confusing because saline is routinely pushed to clear a sluggish art line and waste blood, from a lab draw, is sometimes pushed back via the art line.

    Thanks to all that clarified the underlying reasons for not pushing MEDS via an art line.
  10. 0
    While there have been perfectly good answers given in the thread to date, I just want to point out that the multitude of people answering "because IV stands for intravenous, thats why!" are giving non-answers. I applaud those that actually critically think through what would happen if a medication is given IA and why we try to avoid that (in most cases).

    Now if we could only adequately educate families and patients so that "chemical code only" became a thing of the past. Nothing like epinephrine pooling in your patient's arm.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top