Why cannot give IV medication via artery? - page 2

Hi, I'm new here, please help me to answer the above question. It's looks like stupid question but it bothers my mind.:banghead: I have been searching the answer from internet but I unable to get a good answer. :zzzzz What I... Read More

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    In some situations and clinical areas, medication can be and is often given via an arterial line. Two of the NICUs I have worked in split the TPN through the umbilical arterial and umbilical venous lines, though these are both central and we would not have been done if it were a peripheral art line. I have also seen other medications including morphine given through a central arterial line. In the world of premature babies, things can be a little different.
    suizzz likes this.

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    IntraVENUS???? Go back to your A&P book and read the difference between artery and vein. Tissue type, oxigen, direction of blood flow.
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    I had once worked with a population of patients who used I.V. access for recreational purposes.

    I asked many questions, such as why insulin needles (they call them orange caps). I even asked "why not use an artery?", since you have so few veins left? The answer - I don't think it would be as much fun if my hand got high.
    AtheistRN and roxybabe84 like this.
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    Quote from Woodenpug
    I had once worked with a population of patients who used I.V. access for recreational purposes.

    I asked many questions, such as why insulin needles (they call them orange caps). I even asked "why not use an artery?", since you have so few veins left? The answer - I don't think it would be as much fun if my hand got high.
    only someone who uses IV access for recreational use could come up with an answer like that :chuckle
    roxybabe84, canoehead, Hoozdo, and 2 others like this.
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    Quote from suizzz
    Thank you for your sharing.:1luvu:
    I just want to find out why cannot give IV med. arterially?
    It must be a reason there, isn't?
    Basically because there is no good reason to do so, and plenty of good reasons NOT to.

    Because of increased risks of impairing circulation, inadvertant embolization or excessive bleeding, nurses do not routinely access an artery unless specially trained and for procedures that cannot be done any other way (dialysis/ABGs). As it is much less likely to have the same problems from intravenous infusion (less chance of bleeding profusely/uncontrollably, of permanently impairing circulation or embolizing air).

    Second, most arteries are either hidden or placed where there are are a lot of nerves. I believe this is G-d's way of protecting us....we tend to in nature keep strangers away from those areas and those generally hurt a lot to access (other than the neck, which we tend to instinctively protect. Arteries tend to be deeper than veins and harder to get to except wrists, groins, etc. areas that have a lot of nerve endings.
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    Ouch!
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    I think that anyone who has ever tried to draw an ABG understands the difficulty in accessing an artery. All other (good) reasons aside, imagine trying to inject a small hose into a larger hose that has the water running at full pressure without spilling any of that water.
    canoehead, GHGoonette, and suizzz like this.
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    For me the obvious answer is that IV stands for intravenous.

    Also whenever I think of artery or vein-
    artery=away from the heart (to gain arterial pressure (ABP) or arterial blood gas-for example)
    vein=to the heart (into the circulation)

    I have NEVER heard of instilling any meds into the artery-I used to work in a trauma ICU-maybe things have changed.

    otessa
    netglow likes this.
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    high pressure and the difference in location (artery = deep) and anatomical structures between artery and vein. veins are lesser in pressure and easily accessible
    leslie :-D likes this.
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    dudette10, GHGoonette, billythekid, and 3 others like this.


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