Ultram! Help!

  1. 0 Someone please help me understand the difference between ultram and narcotic pain relievers. How would I explain to the patient what this medication is? Thank you in advance!!
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  3. Visit  mandaaRN profile page

    About mandaaRN

    From 'New Jersey'; Joined Nov '11; Posts: 27; Likes: 4.

    6 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  Indy profile page
    2
    It works on the same receptors as the opiates, however it is only an agonist to those receptors, and not an opiate in and of itself, so you get pain relief without vomiting up your toenails (if that is what narcotics do to you). Side effects are much lessened. A true lightweight might get a little sleepy or a little happy if they really can't handle pain meds, but a drug seeker will foam at the mouth at being handed tramadol for their pain. An arthritic will smile and say thank you.
    mandaaRN and AnonRNC like this.
  5. Visit  ChristineN profile page
    2
    Quote from mandaaRN
    Someone please help me understand the difference between ultram and narcotic pain relievers. How would I explain to the patient what this medication is? Thank you in advance!!
    Can't you just google Ultram or look it up in any drug guide? As a nurse there are lots of meds you will have to explain to patients and you wont have time to come to an internet forum for answers
    poppycat and GrnTea like this.
  6. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    2
    It's a synthetic opioid, it can become an easily-abused drug, and will give you the same side effects (constipation, confusion in elders especially, drowsiness, withdrawal if you are habituated and then stop) (note, this is not the same as addiction--- look THAT up).

    But I agree c ChristineN-- you need a more time-effective way to get answers like this (and for such common drugs, you should know them already). If you are already an RN I don't want to have to explain as if you were a student but even in the hospital you should have references and resources ready to hand. The PDR and the Nurses Drug Reference in hard copy used to be at every nursing station. The pharmacist is a phone call away. You can get a drug guide app for your smart phone.
    poppycat and Meriwhen like this.
  7. Visit  tiroka03 profile page
    0
    sometimes the answers are confusing in those reference books. I applaud any attempt to find answers.
  8. Visit  Indy profile page
    1
    I thought the OP was asking how to translate the info so it's more easily understood.
    mandaaRN likes this.
  9. Visit  rnlately profile page
    0
    Quote from Indy
    It works on the same receptors as the opiates, however it is only an agonist to those receptors, and not an opiate in and of itself, so you get pain relief without vomiting up your toenails (if that is what narcotics do to you). Side effects are much lessened. A true lightweight might get a little sleepy or a little happy if they really can't handle pain meds, but a drug seeker will foam at the mouth at being handed tramadol for their pain. An arthritic will smile and say thank you.
    And you've got that right. They will foam at the mouth and possibly bite too ...LOL


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