subQ narcotics? - page 2

by khine2mn80

24,882 Views | 34 Comments

i 've just came across this subQ morphine injection and its strange to me cos we never give it in this route (in singapore). just wanted to know is it very common in the us? and whats the normal dosage then? thanks... Read More


  1. 0
    i give morphine and dilaudid regularly subcut. usually if the person is going to be requiring a lot of pain meds, i give it through a butterfly, tape it down and cap the end. then you can just push the morphine at regular intervals. works well for those people you cant get an IV site in and oyu dont want to be poking every 4 hrs.
  2. 0
    Quote from KMSRN
    Morphine can be given orally, intravenously, intrathecally, subcutaneously, and rectally. It can also be given IM but I sincerely hope no one is giving pain meds IM anymore.
    Can you elaborate on that - I've never seen pain meds given SQ, and I want to understand why IM is a bad idea.

    Where I work, morphine or Dilaudid are sometimes given IM if it is a pt. with NO IV access and the situation doesn't warrant a central line. In a year in the ER, I've never seen pain meds given SQ - this was news to me.
  3. 0
    Quote from MLOS
    Can you elaborate on that - I've never seen pain meds given SQ, and I want to understand why IM is a bad idea.

    Where I work, morphine or Dilaudid are sometimes given IM if it is a pt. with NO IV access and the situation doesn't warrant a central line. In a year in the ER, I've never seen pain meds given SQ - this was news to me.
    i always avoided IM becuase i was under the impression it was a painful way to give the injection. i love using the butterfly SQ because it's relatively painless to stick the person, you only have to stick them once and then you can push the drugs intermittently, and it doesnt matter if you cant get IV access.
  4. 0
    can you give me a better picture of the butterfly tech? Where is the best spot to put it? Is this standard practice at your hospital fora pt who needs prn sq meds ? I think it is a great idea, but have never seen it in practice.
  5. 0
    cant remember the manugacturer, however there is a device designed to accomplish this....has a huber needle, with adhesive disc....and a valve, with luer access.....usually placed in the abd fat....good luck
  6. 0
    In all honesty, aren't a lot of supposed "IM" meds given SQ? I mean, the longest IM needle we stock is 1 1/2 in. and I'll just tell ya, 1 1/2 inches isn't enough for a lot of people.
  7. 0
    We give morphine sub-q with our very sick and dying pateints so that we don't have to stick them numerous times for IV. We also give morphine topically, avoiding any sticks and this is a wonderful creation.

    smoo
  8. 0
    Quote from Maggie Mae
    can you give me a better picture of the butterfly tech? Where is the best spot to put it? Is this standard practice at your hospital fora pt who needs prn sq meds ? I think it is a great idea, but have never seen it in practice.
    I've given morphine this way. We call them "buttons", and I've seen them and placed them myself in abd, upper arm, and even outer thigh and buttocks if needed. I work LTC tho, and we have alot of pts on the way out, due to terminal conditions. When my Mom was a ca pt at my facility, she had several "buttons" for the several sq meds she was given. Helps save the pt from multiple sticks. They're great, can't praise them enough! Just remember, one "button" per med, dedicated to admin of that med, and changed q 3 d at most facilities I've been to.
  9. 0
    think these links will help:

    sq continuous morphine infusion, i've tended to use area with largest sq fat pad, generally leg. insert 25-27 gauge butterfly needle at 30 to 45 degree angle or use subq button. site rotated minimum of q 7 days, many get changed q 3 days when redness/lump develops at insertion site.


    subcutaneous infusions

    fast fact and concept #028: subcutaneous infusions

    s u b cuta n eo u s th e ra p y: www.palliative.uab.edu/response/section5-5.pdf

    procedure: [color=windowtext]subcutaneous cannula insertion procedure

    button type sub-q devices:
    clearview "sub-q" needle infusion set
    right angle needle infusion sets designed specifically for the delivery of medications
    to the subcutaneous tissue.


    infusion sets
  10. 0
    I worked in an ER where we had a lot of patients with Sickle Cell Anemia. The most common pain med was Morphine SQ. That was my first time doing this on a regular basis. It controlled the pain longer.


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