narc waste a little long - page 3

.. we had a nurse at the hospital where i work have a pt who had diluaded 1mg scheduled every 6 hours.. well instead of wasting the dose of diluaded , she put in her pocket and saved it for the next dose .. she was written up for... Read More

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    Quote from applewhitern
    Heck, I remember when xanax, ativan, librium, etc., were not even considered a "lock up" med. They were just laying around in the patient's drug drawer!
    I was surprised to find that propofol is not a lock up drug.
    oncnurse1997 and Altra like this.

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  2. 0
    Quote from applewhitern
    I have worked in facilities where it was acceptable to keep narcotics for the next use. When I worked at a large university teaching hospital, we even kept them at the bedside in PICU. The only thing that really matters is that you follow your employer's policy. Heck, I remember when xanax, ativan, librium, etc., were not even considered a "lock up" med. They were just laying around in the patient's drug drawer! This issue has already been dealt with by your hospital's administration, so I don't know why you are concerned with it. Just waste narcs according to your policy, and no, I wouldn't risk putting them in your pocket.
    They're still not locked drugs where I work. Ativan is used left, right and center but it's in the patient's own drug drawer. As far as I know we don't have any issues with that. But I guess I may not hear about some occurences. AND it's not uncommon for nurses to keep narcs to use for later. Especially Morph for chest pain, 10mg mixed 1:1 in a 10cc syringe and you keep it to give 2mg at a time...
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    Quote from Horseshoe
    I was surprised to find that propofol is not a lock up drug.
    Yes, but at the rate we go through bottles of Propofol we'd never have a cupboard big enough. haha
  4. 0
    so, a lot of my buddies are starting to joke around about narcotics, now that i'm about to start the nuts and bolts of nursing training. they make jests about "now you can hook up the morphine, bro!" truthfully, i know that they are just making jokes like buddies do. but, in this day and age, i feel so paranoid about drugs and narcotics and stuff, that i don't even want to JOKE about stealing drugs.

    do any of you "vets" have any good stories about diversion and stuff that i could tell to my friends, just so i can quench any of these narc "jokes?"

    thanks.
  5. 1
    Wasting drugs is a stupid exercise. Unless it's propofol, how do you know what people are squirting out that needle. No addict EVER got caught because of that useless exercise. Resesearchers are working a "litmus" strip where drugs can be tested on the spot so ensure that is in, indeed, Fentanyl that is being wasted and not saline. I never heard of 2 nurses having to witness a waste. That just makes it TWICE as dumb.
    oncnurse1997 likes this.
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    Quote from subee
    Wasting drugs is a stupid exercise. Unless it's propofol, how do you know what people are squirting out that needle. No addict EVER got caught because of that useless exercise. Resesearchers are working a "litmus" strip where drugs can be tested on the spot so ensure that is in, indeed, Fentanyl that is being wasted and not saline. I never heard of 2 nurses having to witness a waste. That just makes it TWICE as dumb.
    I do tend to agree with you about it being useless. Many cases nurses will say, "can you waste this with me...oh, I just squirted it in the garbage can." Most nurses will still 'witness' the waste in the Pyxis. Part of the required wasting ritual might have to do with legal reasons--for example if nurse dirverts narcs and then uses them at work, then causes harm to pt because the nurse is high...the hospital would have to answer for why it does not have a policy in place to try and prevent that. Yeah, stupid reason, but I can imagine it being part of the reason.
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    PSU_13. Of cours, you are right about a hospital needing to have somthing in place but witnessed wasting doesn't address the problem. Education, education, education. That slow and expensive stuff. Nurses have little or no didactics in addictions and yet, at least half of the patients in the hospitals are there because of excessive eating, eating crap, cigarettes, lack of exercise, prescription meds abuse....you get the picture. Yet staff addicts usually don't get detected until very late in the disease when they're really unable to think anymore and do something radically stupid, unless they're in anesthesia where death is sometimes the first presentation of a problem. Unused drugs should be returned to the pharmacy where they could be randomly tested
    psu_213 likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from stargazer88
    Where I've worked, we have saved narcs to use for the next dose, as long as it's the same nurse giving it. We label and date the vial and put it in the med cart in a lock box. We waste what's left at end of shift. We do always waste with 2 nurses. I know of some nurses who do keep it in their pocket if they are giving it frequently. Nobody I know has ever been written up for it. The narc isn't wasted every time because it's expensive. The facility trusts the nurses unless there is cause not to. It's nice to be trusted, but I think that is not the norm in this day and age.

    We always saved it labeled in a lock box of the medcart and anything that wasn't used was wasted with 1 nurse witness. We used to put them in our pockets but they frowned upon that later on when they were having so much problem with narcs being taken by nurses and patients getting saline instead of pain meds.


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