Online LPN Programs, I have two listed. Are there anymore?

  1. 0
    Hi,
    I am a soon to be new mom, and my plan if all else fails is to go to a nursing school that starts in June 2005 and will end in July of 2006. They only have a day program, so if I work I want be working full time. I will most likely go back to being a CNA PRN or part -time if I can find a position. If not I will try to work in retail. But I have been searching for an online program for LPN's. They have alot out there for RN to BSN, and some for LPN to RN, but only two (that I have found thus far), for people who have never been nurses before that want to beome LPN"s. The two that I have found are listed below.

    1. Deaconess College of Nursing - http://www.deaconess.edu/
    2. Northwest Technical College - http://distance.minnesota.edu/programs.php

    The first one has a program where you become an LPN in 3 semestes, and then continue to study for another 3 semesters and get your ADN. I know it's great right? So here are the cons first off tuition id ridicoulas for the first 3 semester atleast, you will be paying $5000 per semester to beomw an LPN. I mean come on. The second 3 semester the tuintion is the same but atleat you will then be working towards a degree. Next con you have to travel up there after each semester for a validation exam on-site to make sure you have learned all that you were supposed to in that semester. But back to the pros they are accredited, and this is oh so true because of the fact that you can get government financial aid in the form of Pell grants and Loans. Ohh yea, and you have to find a place that will allow you to do your clinicals in your hometown.

    The sencond programs' tuition is much less, about $1600 a semester, and you can also recieve government financial aid. The cons about this one well you have to go onsite just like the other one but you will go more times a semester, because they require nursing skills AND CLINCALS to be done up there, as well as IV certification.


    So, I introduced these programs to those who may be interested, and in return I ask that if you know of any programs like the first with less tuition, or something completely online, with clinicals where I live, and NO on-site visits please let me know.

    Thanks in advance
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  4. 0
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    Quote from new_mom_lpn_student
    hi,
    i am a soon to be new mom, and my plan if all else fails is to go to a nursing school that starts in june 2005 and will end in july of 2006. they only have a day program, so if i work i want be working full time. i will most likely go back to being a cna prn or part -time if i can find a position. if not i will try to work in retail. but i have been searching for an online program for lpn's. they have alot out there for rn to bsn, and some for lpn to rn, but only two (that i have found thus far), for people who have never been nurses before that want to beome lpn"s. the two that i have found are listed below.

    1. deaconess college of nursing - http://www.deaconess.edu/
    2. northwest technical college - http://distance.minnesota.edu/programs.php

    the first one has a program where you become an lpn in 3 semestes, and then continue to study for another 3 semesters and get your adn. i know it's great right? so here are the cons first off tuition id ridicoulas for the first 3 semester atleast, you will be paying $5000 per semester to beomw an lpn. i mean come on. the second 3 semester the tuintion is the same but atleat you will then be working towards a degree. next con you have to travel up there after each semester for a validation exam on-site to make sure you have learned all that you were supposed to in that semester. but back to the pros they are accredited, and this is oh so true because of the fact that you can get government financial aid in the form of pell grants and loans. ohh yea, and you have to find a place that will allow you to do your clinicals in your hometown.

    the sencond programs' tuition is much less, about $1600 a semester, and you can also recieve government financial aid. the cons about this one well you have to go onsite just like the other one but you will go more times a semester, because they require nursing skills and clincals to be done up there, as well as iv certification.


    so, i introduced these programs to those who may be interested, and in return i ask that if you know of any programs like the first with less tuition, or something completely online, with clinicals where i live, and no on-site visits please let me know.

    thanks in advance
  5. 0
    Thanks for the Information on Northwest Tech. College. I am going to look in to the requirements, and how many times a semester one must go and stay there. In addition the avenue to take to optain an ADN or BSN after completing the Northwest program. Once again thanks and feel free to mail me. Cay
  6. 0
    Did you say that at Deaconess you can get pell grants for the LPN program? I am already an LPN working through EC for RN but hubby is lookin into LPN on line.
  7. 0
    Quote from bellcollector
    Did you say that at Deaconess you can get pell grants for the LPN program? I am already an LPN working through EC for RN but hubby is lookin into LPN on line.
    Deaconess's program qualifies for federal financial aid such as Pell Grants, Stafford Loans, etc.

    Cheri Barnett
  8. 0
    Quote from bellcollector
    Did you say that at Deaconess you can get pell grants for the LPN program? I am already an LPN working through EC for RN but hubby is lookin into LPN on line.
    You have to do the entire ASN program with Deaconess.
  9. 0
    Quote from NICURNtobe
    You have to do the entire ASN program with Deaconess.
    You don't have to do the entire program there. After you finish the LPN sequence, and take your NCLEX, you can tranfer to another program or quit. I was worrried about that too when I was looking into it, but I got assured that many students decide to pursue their LPN career full time at stop attending Deaconess.
  10. 0
    Quote from New_Mom_LPN_Student
    You don't have to do the entire program there. After you finish the LPN sequence, and take your NCLEX, you can tranfer to another program or quit. I was worrried about that too when I was looking into it, but I got assured that many students decide to pursue their LPN career full time at stop attending Deaconess.
    There are people on this board that have withdrawn from Deaconess after completing only the PN component. But I would not reveal your intention to only finish the LPN when applying...as the ASN program at Deaconess was not built to be an LPN only. This could affect your being accepted.
    Last edit by fry.girl on Jan 4, '05
  11. 0
    Another alternative to add to this...in NC you can get your EMT, paramedic, and work for one year then apply for a 1 year BSN transition program. The upside is you'll be working and learning the whole time and you get financial aid. If you're interested in ER medicine, this may be a good alternative. Folks were I live go to Winston Salem State (almost ALL on line) to complete the BSN requirements while they are working as a paramedic. Just giving another option...

    Quote from cbarnett2
    There are people on this board that have withdrawn from Deaconess after completing only the PN component. But I would not reveal your intention to only finish the LPN when applying...as the ASN program at Deaconess was built to be an LPN only. This could affect your being accepted.
  12. 0
    Quote from cbarnett2
    There are people on this board that have withdrawn from Deaconess after completing only the PN component. But I would not reveal your intention to only finish the LPN when applying...as the ASN program at Deaconess was built to be an LPN only. This could affect your being accepted.

    I agree with what Cheri is stating. DCN really wants to attract students who are interested in pursuing the asn not just the pn. I don't know how they could stop you from withdrawing and applying for a MO license though.

    However, I have a feeling that there will be increased focus on attracting students who are dedicated to pursuing the asn. I know that when I went for validations several weeks ago, there where not many of us planning to withdrawal. Actually, I only know of two students who were pulling out of the program, one of which was going overseas for duty.

    I also know that there were some of us there who were going to take the nclex-pn so we could work while in school and one of the requirements was that the student had to exit out of the program and re-enter the following semester. This was put in place so the student could focus completely on the nclex and thus increase chances of being successful on it. I do believe that requirement has been dropped.


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