I was totally dissed last night - page 9

During my shift at the hospital I work at, I was talking to several nurses who know I'm an Excelsior student. This is a unit I very much want to work in when i graduate. To make a long story short,... Read More

  1. by   scrubbie1
    I get that alot too. But what those people fail to realize (if they go back to their memories) is that much of what they do at the hospital was learned on the job at orientation. Yes, I have done clinicals the traditional way at LPN school and I am doing them through the CPNE. A few weeks observing and taking notes in different settings is all we did the "traditional" way, most nursing programs do not let you do much in due to liability. I am a skilled LPN who does 98% of what an RN does, for less pay. The only problem I see with the CPNE is I feel it should only be offered to LPN's with clinical experience. I have to remind RN's who ask "what about clinicals?" that I did them already, and do them every day on the job at the hospital. AND, many "traditional" schools have a 2 year waiting list or longer for clinicals. Why should I have to wait to perform skills I can do now? When they hear that they capitulate at my logic.
  2. by   kingme
    Can someone explain to me what doing clinicals mean? I am thinking of nursing as a career and the predjudice some of you are dealing with sounds hard to deal with.
  3. by   kimlpn
    Wow! I haven't been on here in several months. I did not realize how EC was looked at so negatively on these boards...and to me it is more on the boards than in real life. I have had no problems obtaining jobs. Ignore it and move on!
  4. by   dbowens02
    Quote from kimlpn
    Wow! I haven't been on here in several months. I did not realize how EC was looked at so negatively on these boards...and to me it is more on the boards than in real life. I have had no problems obtaining jobs. Ignore it and move on!
    I could care less what any of the naysayers say because I don't live to suit them. I stay away from negative people. People like that have a problem with everything and everyone anyway.
  5. by   kingme
    Quote from scrubbie1
    I get that alot too. But what those people fail to realize (if they go back to their memories) is that much of what they do at the hospital was learned on the job at orientation. Yes, I have done clinicals the traditional way at LPN school and I am doing them through the CPNE. A few weeks observing and taking notes in different settings is all we did the "traditional" way, most nursing programs do not let you do much in due to liability. I am a skilled LPN who does 98% of what an RN does, for less pay. The only problem I see with the CPNE is I feel it should only be offered to LPN's with clinical experience. I have to remind RN's who ask "what about clinicals?" that I did them already, and do them every day on the job at the hospital. AND, many "traditional" schools have a 2 year waiting list or longer for clinicals. Why should I have to wait to perform skills I can do now? When they hear that they capitulate at my logic.
    I'm confused...if LPNs can do 98% of what RNs do, yet get held back in the form of less pay because of liability, then why? Why would there even be LPN and RN classifications? Is the missing 2% something really important? There's something in the "logic" I am not capitulating.
  6. by   Tweety
    Quote from kingme
    Can someone explain to me what doing clinicals mean? I am thinking of nursing as a career and the predjudice some of you are dealing with sounds hard to deal with.

    "Clinicals" is where you as a nursing student go into a hospital/nursing home/clinic, etc. setting and work as a student applying what you learn. This is done under the direction of your school's instructors and is supervised.

    Some distance learning programs acknowledge experience and don't require as many clinicals as some brick and motar schools, and some stick their nose up at this.

    If you have no experience in the nursing profession, then you would go to a more traditional school for your education and clinicals.
  7. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from Law of Fives
    Hello everyone,
    I hear what you are all saying. I'm no noob. Been in the field for almost 16 years at one level or another, and you're right, there are far worse insults to be experienced. That being said, the reason for my surprise was due more to the 'who' than the 'what'. I never expected it from this particular person. I guess it goes to show, never let your guard down. I guess on some level what she said kind of hurt. But, oh well! I fired back with: "Ya, I guess it would piss me off too if someone achieved something in a mere 8 months what took you almost 4 years to achieve!" LOL...childish, but retribution nonetheless!

    I got my bachelor's from EC (thought not in nursing) and believe me, I know how daunting it is to stare at a textbook, know you've got to read it, and have no idea what may or may not be on the final. I'm working on my Lifespan Development exam right now (I cannot get this class to fit into my schedule any other way), and it is NOT as easy as it seems to some. I can't imagine if I had to do those clinical demonstrations....there's a bit of self-discipline that not everyone has, that's REQUIRED to do courses this way.

    (Your comment to them, however "inappropriate", is probably true! And to be honest, I'd probably have said the same thing!)

    It WAS a bit interesting to me that I could "simply" read the textbook (I took the DANTES in Russian History, and EC Exams in Abnormal Psych, Human Resources Management, and Org Behavior - got two "A's" and 2 "B's") and take the final, but it was NOT easy. In fact, the DANTES was MUCH harder than the EC exams - at least the ECs are from one specific textbook. With DANTES, you get a SELECTION of recommended books. So you're never positive you've picked the best one!

    I heard from graduates at my grad ceremony in Albany who got their BSNs from EC that the program is a real buttkicker. They talked about how it was structured and I WAS IN AWE...I wish you luck and ALL success!!!
    Last edit by carolinapooh on Jan 25, '06
  8. by   kingme
    Quote from Tweety
    "Clinicals" is where you as a nursing student go into a hospital/nursing home/clinic, etc. setting and work as a student applying what you learn. This is done under the direction of your school's instructors and is supervised.

    So it's like a internship or what doctors do (understudy?), huh. And I guess the challenge then is to find the right school.
  9. by   bethm
    Quote from Law of Fives
    your opinion, it's america tho, you're entitled.

    what is your point here exactly? One better than the other?

    one of the reasons I chose EC. Some people can assimilate information without having to be spoon fed by 'professors'. The nonsense part, IMHO, is still your (not only 'your')opinion (no offense), care to back it up?

    Good, but why would you? You don't even know me. Others here are questioning 'credentials' without knowing anything other than the fact that I am 'nontraditional' in my current educational endeavors. Their prejudicial tone when dicussing the matter further validates the fact that they are basing their beliefs on something less than conjecture.

    I'm not a nurse yet. Seriously, read the thread, with an open mind. I have, and found it to be very enlightening.

    Based on what, again? Not on the end product, because I can think of two handfuls of retort.

    Good talking to ya, have a good day!
    QUOTE: one of the reasons I chose EC. Some people can assimilate information without having to be spoon fed by 'professors'. The nonsense part, IMHO, is still your (not only 'your')opinion (no offense), care to back it up?

    I completely agree with Law of Fives....I am a traditional school graduate, and aside from the first two semesters of clinicals the courses could have been self taught. As far as clinicals, after 2nd semster (out of 5) we hardly had any interaction with our instructor, the apron strings were cut so to speak.

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