Any ADN-BSN programs without ridiculous papers? - page 20

by adnrnstudent | 51,035 Views | 299 Comments

Taking my 1st ADN-BSN class. Thinking of dropping it with only 1 week left. 1st class and already a 6 to 8 page paper. A concept analysis of 1 of the following 4 words: Caring, Hope, Trust, or Fear. This is absolutely... Read More


  1. 2
    Quote from KarenfRN
    From what I know, dyslexia does not prevent one from using a dictionary.

    Oh so sorry, I was unaware we were being graded!
    DizzyLizzyNurse and PMFB-RN like this.
  2. 1
    Quote from Shuggypie
    Don't know if I missed something in this thread, but I was expecting a list of schools, particularly online RN to BSN programs that do not require a ridiculous amount of papers to be written, are there any out there, that anyone is attending? Are there any online RN to BSN schools which still administer tests? Hopefully this is not too far off topic.
    I'd love to see this list as much as you would!
    chevyv likes this.
  3. 1
    I would have liked to go for the BSN because I wanted to, not because I have to. I hate writing papers as well. With only a few more classes to go, I have to say I really don't feel I've enhanced my nursing practice at all either. I would dare to go on to say that I feel as though I'm just jumping through hoops to keep a job or find one as my current employer will be closing their doors within the next yr or two. Most places are going for magnet status and they really want that 4yr degree. That means I have to jump through hoops, write huge amounts of papers, and then go into even more debt to take the next horrible class. Jaded much am I? I just feel like the whole BSN completion program should be changed to accomodate and acknowledge the nurse. Why do I have to take Womens Health and Physical Assessment? Didn't most of us do that in our ADN program not to mention do physical assessments on the job daily? It's almost as if they have these holes to fill and money to swindle so they put classes in that really don't enhance the ADN.
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
  4. 2
    Just because someone does something daily doesn't mean they do it right. I have now taken a version of physical assessment three times an I learned from each one. I go to conferences to stay up-to-date on new techniques and procedures. I am constantly evaluating my assessment in effort to make it better. Is that a bad thing?
    Susie2310 and wooh like this.
  5. 3
    Quote from BostonFNP
    Just because someone does something daily doesn't mean they do it right. I have now taken a version of physical assessment three times an I learned from each one. I go to conferences to stay up-to-date on new techniques and procedures. I am constantly evaluating my assessment in effort to make it better. Is that a bad thing?
    *** Chevyv says she already took women's health and physican assessment in her ADN program. While I certainly agree with BostonFNP that we can always improve our assessment skills, I don't see any calls to make BSN prepared RNs, who probably also took a similar class, repeat it. I think it is fair to ask why a BSN program is repeating material covered previously.
    My job is to respond to rapid response calls. Many of these calls are for changes in patient condition that went unobserved by the staff RN until things got pretty obvious. I haven't observed ADN prepared RNs missing more of these changes in patient condition than the BSN or MSN prepared RNs who work at my hospital.
    What DID make a difference was suggesting to nurses managers that certain nurses attend an assessment class. We are lucky in my hospital in the we have access to high qualiety free CE classes. You can see the available classes here:
    http://www.tchpeducation.com/calendar/index.htm
    DizzyLizzyNurse, chevyv, and nursel56 like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from PMFB-RN

    I think it is fair to ask why a BSN program is repeating material covered previously.

    What DID make a difference was suggesting to nurses managers that certain nurses attend an assessment class.
    In my opinion ADN to BSN programs repeat this because they cant differentiate between those that need a remedial course (as you suggest) an those that do combined with the fact they trust their own educators for such a vital skill.

    Would you sign a new RRT nurse off for intubation or an Aline without actually teaching them or seeing them do it just because they did it at another hospital?
    Last edit by BostonFNP on Apr 2, '13
    wooh likes this.
  7. 1
    Again, some people are generalizing the RN-BSN health assessment course as covering the same material in the same depth as ADN programs. I took an advanced health assessment course in my RN-BSN program that covered new assessment skills that were not taught in my ADN program, i.e. comprehensive eye exam using an opthalmoscope, and hearing test/ear exam. The course also expanded on some of the assessments we had already learned in my ADN program. I learned a lot of new information about assessments. It appears some people just cannot hear that some RN-BSN programs teach good quality information and/or some people are opposed to learning anything new.

    If you want to avoid a RN-BSN health assessment class that only covers information you've already studied at the same level you've already studied, then research the schools you plan to attend. If you already went through an RN-BSN program health assessment class and were dissatisfied with what you learned, did you research the program first?
    Tait likes this.
  8. 0
    In my opinion ADN to BSN programs repeat this because they cant differentiate between those that need a remedial course (as you suggest) an those that do combined with the fact they trust their own educators for such a vital skill.
    *** Yes, you are probably right.

    Would you sign a new RRT nurse off for intubation or an Aline without actually teaching them or seeing them do it just because they did it at another hospital?
    *** Great point.
  9. 1
    Quote from PMFB-RN

    *** Yes, you are probably right.

    *** Great point.
    Plus they like the $$.
    chevyv likes this.
  10. 0
    Again, some people are generalizing the RN-BSN health assessment course as covering the same material in the same depth as ADN programs.
    *** Yes right. In fact the BSN program may cover assessement is much less or greater detail than the ADN programs.

    I took an advanced health assessment course in my RN-BSN program that covered new assessment skills that were not taught in my ADN program, i.e. comprehensive eye exam using an opthalmoscope, and hearing test/ear exam.
    *** Yes same for mine. While it did cover assessments not covered in my ADN program, it did not cover any assessments I had not already been trained in either on the job, or in a non-college class like the TCHP classes I linked to in post 194.

    The course also expanded on some of the assessments we had already learned in my ADN program. I learned a lot of new information about assessments. It appears some people just cannot hear that some RN-BSN programs teach good quality information and/or some people are opposed to learning anything new.
    *** Opposed to learning anything new? One of my main complaints is that I was prevented from learning new things by spending so much time in the RN to BSN program. One could easily make the case that those who desire to spend a lot of time in an RN to BSN program are the ones who do not wish to learn anything new. _I_ wouldn't make that case as I consider it exactly as abserd as your statement above.

    If you want to avoid a RN-BSN health assessment class that only covers information you've already studied at the same level you've already studied, then research the schools you plan to attend. If you already went through an RN-BSN program health assessment class and were dissatisfied with what you learned, did you research the program first?
    *** First no I didn't. I did the free program recommended by my employer. However it was an acceredited program. Isn't that the point of accredidation? Doesn't that indicate the program has met minimum standards? Why would there be such a larg difference in programs? Do we need to segragate those who when to "good" programs from thse nurses who went to "bad" programs?


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