Woman with nursing license advertises as "Baby Nurse"

  1. http://www.babiease.com/

    and publication in the Washington Post: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...022400380.html


    I found out about this woman through the Center for Nursing Advocacy and thought I would share with the community here. This woman would be better suited changing her title to "caretaker." It seems as if she is using the good nursing profession name to advance her own agenda, no matter how deceitful. She has a small font disclaimer on her page, yet does not want to lose the title "Nurse." Is it not illegal in her state per the Nurse Practice Act to identify oneself falsely as "Nurse?" I wonder if she introduces herself to others as such. It seems dangerous to the parents' perceptions and newborns and of nursing's image. It just grinds my gears.
    Last edit by BethBSN on Sep 18, '07 : Reason: *
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  2. 111 Comments

  3. by   FireStarterRN
    Interesting. So, what's the law, does the BON have a copyright on the word 'nurse'? Traditionally in Britain it is synonymous with 'nanny'. Personally, it doesn't bother me, I don't feel threatened by someone using the word 'nurse' as in 'nanny'. It sounds as if she has a lot of experience and provides an important service. Just my two cents.
  4. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from jlsRN
    Personally, it doesn't bother me, I don't feel threatened by someone using the word 'nurse' as in 'nanny'.
    I'm sure the physician would be offended if PAs referred to themselves as doctors.

    I'm sure the college professor would be offended if student assistants referred to themselves as instructors.

    I'm sure the chemical engineer would be offended if factory workers referred to themselves as engineers.

    I'm sure the attorney would be offended if paralegals referred to themselves as lawyers.

    I'm sure the physical therapist would be offended if restorative aides referred to themselves as physical therapists.

    If we have a title, we really need to protect it. Other professions protect theirs!
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Sep 18, '07
  5. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I'm sure the physician would be offended if PAs referred to themselves as doctors.

    I'm sure the college professor would be offended if student assistants referred to themselves as instructors.

    I'm sure the chemical engineer would be offended if factory workers referred to themselves as engineers.

    I'm sure the attorney would be offended if paralegals referred to themselves as lawyers.

    I'm sure the physical therapist would be offended if restorative aides referred to themselves as physical therapists.

    If we have a title, we really need to protect it. Other professions protect theirs!
    Dr Laura uses the title 'doctor', implying that she is a doctor in the medical sense, when she really isn't. Anyways, it personally doesn't bother me. My title is RN, not nurse. Nurse has several other meanings, including 'nanny' and 'to breastfeed'. It also is a verb that means 'to tend to a sick person' such as in "She nursed him back to health".
  6. by   rn/writer
    Quote from jlsRN
    Dr Laura uses the title 'doctor', implying that she is a doctor in the medical sense, when she really isn't. Anyways, it personally doesn't bother me. My title is RN, not nurse. Nurse has several other meanings, including 'nanny' and 'to breastfeed'. It also is a verb that means 'to tend to a sick person' such as in "She nursed him back to health".
    Dr. Laura is allowed to use the title. She has a doctorate in physiology and post-doctorate credentials in counseling.

    The point is that there needs to be truth in advertising. In many states, nurse is a protected title. What this woman is doing could be viewed as legally fraudulent and ethically deceptive. Nurse, the verb, is not a protected word. Nurse, the noun and title, is.
  7. by   jmgrn65
    Agree with Commuter we have a title it should be protected. It is one of the many reasons some don't consider Nurses as a professional.
    Nurse implies someone with a nursing degree or liscense. She does explain but how many people will look at what a Baby Nurse is, I think it is wrong.
    Is it right for the MA in your doctors office to say that she is the nurse? They do it all the time.
    BON may not own the word Nurse but I think we as professionals do!
  8. by   caroladybelle
    I am wondering if she listed herself as being "BabyDoctor" or "BabyAttourney" in the Washington Post....with the same disclaimer, if it would fly?????

    Somehow, I think not.
  9. by   sunnyjohn
    From that website:
    Disclaimer: A Baby Nurse is a newborn specialist. Meredith Ball is not a licensed nurse, Registered Nurse (RN), Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA). She will not perform clinical or medical care on Mother or Baby.

    The use of the term "nurse" is not acceptable in some states. By law only a licensed nurse, R.N or L.P.N, may hold the title of nurse. Baby Nurses in these states are known as Newborn Specialists. Babiease, LLC is a nationwide service and because the term "Baby Nurse" is permitted in the remaining states, the term will be left on this website.
    I dunno about this. Sounds like she has been told about using the title 'nurse" and found a legal loophole.
  10. by   BabyRN2Be
    While maybe not 100% fitting, maybe the title "Postpartum Doula" would be more appropriate. Typically a PD would take care of mom and baby in the first few weeks after birth. However, she sounds like she wants to focus on the baby side rather than mom.
  11. by   elkpark
    The word "nurse," by itself, is a generic term with a number of different meanings. In most states, what is legally protected are the specific terms "Registered Nurse" and "Licensed Practical (or Vocational, depending on the state) Nurse." She makes clear on her website that she's not licensed and makes clear what services she's offering. I'm obviously in the minority here, but it doesn't really bother me.
  12. by   pickledpepperRN
    Maryland Code > Health Occupations > Title 8. Nurses .
    8-703. Misrepresentation.

    (a) In general.-

    (6) (b) Certain representations prohibited.- Unless authorized to practice registered nursing or licensed practical nursing under this title, a person may not use the word "nurse" to describe the profession of the person.

    http://www.mbon.org/main.php?v=norm&...ctice_act.html
  13. by   elkpark
    Quote from spacenurse
    Maryland Code > Health Occupations > Title 8. Nurses .
    8-703. Misrepresentation.

    (a) In general.-

    (6) (b) Certain representations prohibited.- Unless authorized to practice registered nursing or licensed practical nursing under this title, a person may not use the word "nurse" to describe the profession of the person.

    http://www.mbon.org/main.php?v=norm&...ctice_act.html
    Okay -- she states on her website that, in some states, the generic term "nurse" is legally protected, and in those states, people that do what she does are known as "Newborn Specialists." So what?

    I guarantee you that anyone savvy enough to set up a business where she gets paid $28/hour for, essentially, babysitting is savvy enough to make sure that she's not breaking any laws or state regulations in doing so ...
  14. by   imenid37
    Quote from caroladybelle
    I am wondering if she listed herself as being "BabyDoctor" or "BabyAttourney" in the Washington Post....with the same disclaimer, if it would fly?????

    Somehow, I think not.
    You could bet a large sum of $ on that! I do not know specific rules, but MD BON will soon be dealing w/ her since she has put herself in the paper. I found a quote on her website interesting:
    "A baby nurse is not a Registered Nurse (RN), Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA). At present there is no formal schooling for a baby nurse, though the art of baby nursing can be dated back to very early times in history. A skilled baby nurse draws upon a variety of disciplines to prepare her for this job including newborn care, early childhood education, lactation education, nutrition, sleep habits, safety, parenting and bonding. Babiease is firmly committed to staying abreast of the most current practice."
    As far as the no formal schooling goes. There are such things as becoming a certified doula or going to school to become a licensed care nurses (RN's and LPN's) specialized in neonatal nursing. She must think there is something she is getting out of the title nurse or she would not use it. She would call herself a mother's helper, which is truly what she is. I've delivered a few babies, what would happen if I called myself an ob. I bet I might get a nice orange or striped junpsuit to wear.

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