Woman with nursing license advertises as "Baby Nurse" - page 8

and publication in the Washington Post: I found out about this woman through the Center for Nursing Advocacy and thought I would share with the community here. This woman would be better suited... Read More

  1. by   roseynurse345
    This lady is misrepresenting herself, my great aunt was trained to be a babynurse @ St. Vincent's hospital in NY, she received 2 years of training from there, she had the official title"babynurse". I think the only way this lady should have this title if she received formal training, btw my aunt was not an RN either.
  2. by   Katnip
    Quote from jlsRN
    Dr Laura uses the title 'doctor', implying that she is a doctor in the medical sense, when she really isn't. Anyways, it personally doesn't bother me. My title is RN, not nurse. Nurse has several other meanings, including 'nanny' and 'to breastfeed'. It also is a verb that means 'to tend to a sick person' such as in "She nursed him back to health".
    She has a doctoral degree and is entitled to use the title Dr.

    In the U.S. the title nurse used in a professional capacity implies a nursing license. Nanny, caregiver, au pair, are more appropriate titles for someone in that position.
  3. by   pedinurse05
    Quote from jlsRN
    Dr Laura uses the title 'doctor', implying that she is a doctor in the medical sense, when she really isn't. Anyways, it personally doesn't bother me. My title is RN, not nurse. Nurse has several other meanings, including 'nanny' and 'to breastfeed'. It also is a verb that means 'to tend to a sick person' such as in "She nursed him back to health".

    I agree doesn't bother me either. She does have a whole section about NOT being an RN, LVN, etc...
  4. by   DeLana_RN
    This is so wrong! :angryfire I always assumed that a "baby nurse" had to be a licensed nurse, not nanny. I always wondered why someone would hire a nurse as a nanny, though (never mind that this "nurse" makes more money per hour than many nurses...).

    Nobody but a licensed nurse should be allowed to use the title!!!

    DeLana
  5. by   justme1972
    I am SO GLAD that someone posted this article.

    Did you know that even growing up in a large medical family...I have heard the term "baby nurse" for years, and I always thought it was a MINIMUM of an LPN-level Professional (and up), that people hired to come in and help take care of newborns.

    I wonder how many of her clients hire her that just 'assume' she has more qualifications than she really does.
  6. by   justme1972
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Dr. Laura has a doctoral degree under her belt; therefore, she is legally allowed to use the title of 'doctor.' Even though she is not an MD or DO, she is a doctor by virtue of her Ph.D degree, so her utilization of the title of 'doctor' is perfectly acceptable. It's the same issue with Dr. Phil.
    I disagree, there is a huge difference.

    Dr. Phil actually has a PhD in Clinical Psychology, which isn't an easy degree to get, and are considered to be EXPERTS to the assessment of psychotherapy...to me that is a far cry from the credentials Dr. Laura has when her PhD isn't even in Psychology...at all. She has a counseling credentials, but not a counseling degree.
    Last edit by justme1972 on Sep 30, '07
  7. by   leslymill
    And they are both talk show hosts, that wouldn't know how to change a diaper.
  8. by   RN Randy
    Quote from HeartsOpenWide
    First thing I thought when I saw this title was "NICU nurse" or "Peds nurse". Maybe this woman should call herself "baby pro" or "baby expert"; but she needs to drop the "nurse" part.

    I can not believe she make $28/hr!!! Trained and certified postpardum doulas do not make near that much.
    It isn't about training in certain circles, it's about being the right person.

    Making money is easy if you don't mind being "subordinate", are able to conduct yourself properly, and know where to look.....

    http://www.celebrities-staffing.com/

    Plus, anyone in the DC area can simply place a smaller ad below hers and say "Now, if you want a 'Real Nurse', call me.... $30/hr."

    Personally, I find it quite laughable that our society even needs her services. But... some folks seem to need Xanax and Valium just to get through a dry bowel movement.

    I would have no problem renting myself out for $28/hr to assist these people as they sit, offering moral support, kleenex and even presenting the roll on cue, as a Bowel Evacuation Specialist. Or Poopy Nurse for kids, maybe?

    R. Belcher, Necessary Needs, LLC "YES! You can do it!"

    Available Worldwide.

    ...And I would be willing to bet someone, somewhere; would hire me.

    C'est la vie!
  9. by   RN Randy
    Quote from cyberkat
    She has a doctoral degree and is entitled to use the title Dr.

    In the U.S. the title nurse used in a professional capacity implies a nursing license. Nanny, caregiver, au pair, are more appropriate titles for someone in that position.
    An excellent point indeed. I know many Doctors in the medical field, but only a few physicians. [if you get my drift...]
    I'm also biased towards the D.O. over an M.D. but that's another thread.... :-)

    I think we got the symantics askew many years ago, as the average person's exposure to those with Doctorate degrees was generally limited to the family/town physician, who used the title 'Doctor'.

    rb
  10. by   HeartsOpenWide
    Quote from roseynurse345
    This lady is misrepresenting herself, my great aunt was trained to be a babynurse @ St. Vincent's hospital in NY, she received 2 years of training from there, she had the official title"babynurse". I think the only way this lady should have this title if she received formal training, btw my aunt was not an RN either.
    So women should have formal training before they can become mothers?
  11. by   rn/writer
    Originally Posted by roseynurse345
    This lady is misrepresenting herself, my great aunt was trained to be a babynurse @ St. Vincent's hospital in NY, she received 2 years of training from there, she had the official title"babynurse". I think the only way this lady should have this title if she received formal training, btw my aunt was not an RN either.


    Quote from HeartsOpenWide
    So women should have formal training before they can become mothers?
    As per teeituptom's mom, only if they advertise and they're paid for their services.
  12. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from chellepnp2007
    This woman claims to be able to help put the infants on a schedule and that she works for 1 to 8 weeks in the home of the pp woman? As a pediatric nurse practitioner, and also all of the evidence based research and pediatricians I know would never recommend any feeding or sleeping schedule for any infant or infants under 4 months old. They can not be kept to a schedule. It is dangerous. They need to be fed on cue. Since this woman provides non clinical services, I doubt she is weighing these infants or able to detect jaundice or any other health concern. Yet the family thinks they have hired a personal "nurse". Hmm I think this is wrong for her to use this title.
    I so agree with you here. It is disheartening to see how many of today's new parents either don't realize that their lives must change after their children are born or are too self-centered to make it change.

    I have new parents upset over the idea that you have to feed a newborn Q2H. Or that sleep is in short supply when you have a baby.

    steph
    Last edit by Spidey's mom on Sep 30, '07
  13. by   User123456
    Quote from rn/writer
    Dr. Laura is allowed to use the title. She has a doctorate in physiology and post-doctorate credentials in counseling.

    The point is that there needs to be truth in advertising. In many states, nurse is a protected title. What this woman is doing could be viewed as legally fraudulent and ethically deceptive. Nurse, the verb, is not a protected word. Nurse, the noun and title, is.
    totally agree Dr. laura aswell as dr. ruth both have doctorates.

close