Woman with nursing license advertises as "Baby Nurse" - page 5

and publication in the Washington Post: I found out about this woman through the Center for Nursing Advocacy and thought I would share with the community here. This woman would be better suited... Read More

  1. by   elkpark
    Quote from jmgrn65
    In my state you need a degree.
    (Off topic, I realize, but, again, not really true -- there are still hospital-based diploma programs in OH that lead to RN licensure without granting either an Associate's or Baccalaureate degree.)
  2. by   UM Review RN
    Because she lists her "credentials" at the top of her website, leading people to believe she's a real nurse, THEN the disclaimer that she is not a licensed nurse, I think that the public will conclude that she has more expertise than she actually has and that will lead people to pay more money than the average Home Health Aide (because that's actually what she is) would make.

    Therefore, I think she needs to be reported to the BON and the situation needs to be addressed.
  3. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from jlsRN
    You right about that. So, she's being a good American capitalist after all!

    Personally it doesn't bother me one bit. In the grand sceme of things, I don't feel as if it affects me. I'd rather see attention paid to other, more vital issues that directly affect my ability to provide safe patient care, and be well compensated for it.

    In the grand scheme of things, if she's allowed to continue, and one of her charges becomes a statistic in a sentinel event, what profession gets the black eye?

    Please. The profession has been stressed enough with all the hairsplitting semantics.

    We know, and she knows, what she is implying. But the people who are hiring her do not.

    That's what makes it wrong.
    Last edit by UM Review RN on Sep 20, '07
  4. by   FireStarterRN
    Gee, I feel as if I'm respected by the public. I get all positives when people find out my profession. I'm esteemed in my community because of what I do. I don't understand this furor over semantics and image because my personal experience is that I'm respected by people because of what I do.
  5. by   jjjoy
    Quote from CyndieRN2007
    WHAT???!! I strongly disagree. I get so many people asking me to diagnose their s/sx!! They dont expect me to tell them to call a doctor, they expect me to know what it is!!!
    Different people have different assumptions so I take back my generalization.

    This particular person seems to be very clear on what services she is selling and while she is using the term "Baby Nurse" she seems to have gone out of her way to emphasize that she's not offering licensed nursing care.
  6. by   jjjoy
    Quote from jlsRN
    Gee, I feel as if I'm respected by the public. I get all positives when people find out my profession. I'm esteemed in my community because of what I do. I don't understand this furor over semantics and image because my personal experience is that I'm respected by people because of what I do.
    The issue here is that some nurses are upset that this person is borrowing upon the good image of nurses to promote her services even though she isn't a nurse.

    I can see where it's easier to call oneself a "baby nurse" than say a "nanny" which usually doesn't involved specialized infant care. I tend to think of nannies as providing full-time child care for all ages. "Mother's helper" sounds like a teenaged neighbor hired to run errands. Still, some states have legislated to protect the title "nurse" and in those states she cannot advertise herself as such.
  7. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from jjjoy
    The issue here is that some nurses are upset that this person is borrowing upon the good image of nurses to promote her services even though she isn't a nurse.

    I can see where it's easier to call oneself a "baby nurse" than say a "nanny" which usually doesn't involved specialized infant care. I tend to think of nannies as providing full-time child care for all ages. "Mother's helper" sounds like a teenaged neighbor hired to run errands. Still, some states have legislated to protect the title "nurse" and in those states she cannot advertise herself as such.
    I can see the issue, I totally understand. I guess I semantically view the word 'nurse' in a more general sense, with RN being the license I hold. I think non-licensed people can have wonderful nursing skills. I encounter families who care for loved ones at home with tender care.
  8. by   CarVsTree
    Since she is using "Nurse" in the traditional meaning rather than the current legal meaning (as in Registered Nurse), I have no problem with it. She states very clearly that she is not a medical professional of any kind.

    Actually, nursing evolved into the healthcare profession that it is today. That doesn't necessarily negate the original meaning of the term nurse.

    NURSE: 2. a woman who has the general care of a child or children; dry nurse. 14. to feed and tend in infancy.
    15. to bring up, train, or nurture.
    —Synonyms 9. encourage, abet, help, aid, back. 14. rear, raise. Nurse, nourish, nurture may be used almost interchangeably to refer to bringing up the young. Nurse, however, suggests attendance and service; nourish emphasizes providing whatever is needful for development; and nurture suggests tenderness and solicitude in training mind and manners.
    Reference Link: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/nurse

    I don't like when unlicensed personnel in a medical setting call themselves nurses. However, this is entirely different. She is using baby nurse legitimately. Arguing this case or having the BON go after her (even if they had a right to the term nurse), would make us seem aggressive and hysterical.

    As for her calling herself a baby doctor or attorney, well we all know doctors and lawyers don't nurture!
    Last edit by CarVsTree on Sep 20, '07 : Reason: 'Cause I couldn't understand what I wrote!
  9. by   CarVsTree
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    Because she lists her "credentials" at the top of her website, leading people to believe she's a real nurse, THEN the disclaimer that she is not a licensed nurse, I think that the public will conclude that she has more expertise than she actually has and that will lead people to pay more money than the average Home Health Aide (because that's actually what she is) would make.

    Therefore, I think she needs to be reported to the BON and the situation needs to be addressed.
    I didn't feel that her credentials made her sound at all like an RN or LPN. I thought they made her sound like someone who is really good at caring for babies. The services she offers are unique more along the lines of a baby doula. I wish I could have afforded such services when I had my daughter.

    It is apparantly legal for her to use the term nurse in Maryland as she states on her website. So, don't think the BON would be able to do diddly there.

    Besides, she is using Nurse in the general spirit of its meaning. Baby nurse, is someone that takes care of babies. It is something that was only accessible for the rich back in the day and I'm sure the rich are the clients that she is marketing for. It is kind of nostalgic to use such terminology. I don't think she wants them to think for a second that she is a medical professional.
  10. by   CarVsTree
    Quote from jlsRN
    Interesting. So, what's the law, does the BON have a copyright on the word 'nurse'? Traditionally in Britain it is synonymous with 'nanny'. Personally, it doesn't bother me, I don't feel threatened by someone using the word 'nurse' as in 'nanny'. It sounds as if she has a lot of experience and provides an important service. Just my two cents.
    Here in the states, the traditional meaning of nurse has been lost for the most part. It has been replaced by doula, nanny, au pair, etc.
    Last edit by CarVsTree on Sep 20, '07
  11. by   CarVsTree
    Quote from caroladybelle
    One can ask why she did not just use the term "Nanny" or "Sitter"... and we all know the reason why. Because it doesnt sound as good or as professional to use those terms.

    She is clearly using the term "BabyNurse" to imply that she has more education/skills than she does, and to give her an edge over "Nanny" or "Babysitter", so that she can charge more.
    No, I believe she is using baby nurse, because baby nurses were for the rich. She is marketing to wealthy people. How many people on this board could pay someone $28/hour to get their child's routine going, or "sleep train" their child. I think she's going for the original spirit of the word, not the current clinical meaning of the word.

    It also has a very European flair to it. Her business is in D.C. where there are many diplomats that would understand what a baby nurse is. I think she's found her niche and it has NOTHING to do with our profession.
  12. by   CarVsTree
    Quote from elkpark
    I still just don't care ...

    about our professional identities that we feel threatened by this woman?And, frankly, I think it makes the entire nursing community look kind of petty and defensive when we get our collective panties in a wad whenever something like this comes up, like the Parade article that made the comment that you didn't need a college degree to become an RN (which is, technically speaking, a true statement), as was discussed ad infinitum (ad nauseum) on this board). Don't we have bigger fish to fry?? Are we that insecure

    "The lady doth protest too much, methinks ..."
    Well said!
  13. by   sgmanda
    I am on the fence with this one... I am a Student Nurse now, and I don't want to eventually become so uninvolved that I don't care what happens as long as I get my paycheck. And if one person finds a loophole to use the title "Nurse" then how soon will others catch on? It seems like all of the hard work to turn Nursing into a Profession might be at stake. Then again, she is careful to describe what her services involve, and she does have another disclaimer that seems to make even more of a distinction:

    "Note: If your physician has recommended skilled nursing care for your baby perhaps due to technology dependence (i.e. ventilator or tracheostomy), a major health anomaly, severe feeding intolerance, etc. then Babiease is not suitable. Babiease may be able to make an appropriate referral."

    So, while this person seems to have a lot of experience and is attempting to be at least somewhat responsible about using the term, how about the next "Baby Nurse"?

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