Woman with nursing license advertises as "Baby Nurse" - page 3

and publication in the Washington Post: I found out about this woman through the Center for Nursing Advocacy and thought I would share with the community here. This woman would be better suited... Read More

  1. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from caroladybelle
    One can ask why she did not just use the term "Nanny" or "Sitter"... and we all know the reason why. Because it doesnt sound as good or as professional to use those terms.

    She is clearly using the term "BabyNurse" to imply that she has more education/skills than she does, and to give her an edge over "Nanny" or "Babysitter", so that she can charge more.
    You right about that. So, she's being a good American capitalist after all!

    Personally it doesn't bother me one bit. In the grand sceme of things, I don't feel as if it affects me. I'd rather see attention paid to other, more vital issues that directly affect my ability to provide safe patient care, and be well compensated for it.
  2. by   jjjoy
    Quote from spacenurse
    I am certain that when you are performing ADL's you are also assessing, teaching, evaluating, and planning care. In otherwords you are performing the Nursing Process not simply a task.
    My point was that what exactly "nursing care" is can be confusing, especially to laypeople. They just tend to figure that the person who is assisting with bathing is a nurse. The same goes for the person assisting the doctor in an office. After all, this person is essentially doing "nursing care" as most people understand it... that is promoting comfort and hygiene and assisting the doctor.

    Yet inpatient professional nurse responsibilities go far beyond that to assessing the patient and using their own judgement to determine if the patient is in need of further medical care. Inpatient professional nurse responsbilities also include coordinating other services, patient teaching, and more. If we lump all of that into "nursing care" most lay people only see the nursing care that they are already familiar with - hygiene care and carrying out orders (administering meds).

    If a husband is "nursing" his sick wife, he is assisting with her comfort and doing what the health professionals advised. He isn't pulling upon formal training and previous professional experience to judge what his wife needs medically He isn't responsible for understanding the disease process, the treatments, and educating his wife on it (though one hopes that he has been taught the basics). So he isn't a "nurse" but he is performing some degree of "nursing care."

    Thinking of this, I'm kind of tempted to call professional nursing "medical nursing." After all, strict ADL nursing care doesn't require an in depth knowledge of medical processes but inpatient professional nursing does. Most people understand intuitively that ICU nursing demands a greater in depth understanding of the disease processes and the treatments. After all, the nurse is titrating strong medications on a minute to minute to basis at times.

    Most people don't understand, though, how much medical knowledge "regular" staff nurses need. After all, they just follow orders and promote patient comfort, right? Trained nurses working in the field know that they do a lot more in addition to that and in fact, NAs are often the ones carrying out much of the non-medical nursing care (or whatever you might want to call it).

    But the general public has no idea what else the nurses could be doing... because they don't understand nursing to include judging when certain treatments should stop or start (to 'recommend' to the MD)... they don't understand nursing to include coordinating social work, PT, a trip to diagnostics, discharge meds, etc... and all of the other things nurses do besides promote hygiene and comfort and carry out doctor's orders.
  3. by   teeituptom
    Quote from BethBSN
    http://www.babiease.com/

    and publication in the Washington Post: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...022400380.html


    I found out about this woman through the Center for Nursing Advocacy and thought I would share with the community here. This woman would be better suited changing her title to "caretaker." It seems as if she is using the good nursing profession name to advance her own agenda, no matter how deceitful. She has a small font disclaimer on her page, yet does not want to lose the title "Nurse." Is it not illegal in her state per the Nurse Practice Act to identify oneself falsely as "Nurse?" I wonder if she introduces herself to others as such. It seems dangerous to the parents' perceptions and newborns and of nursing's image. It just grinds my gears.
    I see nothing wrong here. Its a service they provide.
  4. by   vivibonita
    Quote from jlsRN
    My title is RN, not nurse.

    SO, what part the nurse in Registered Nurse (RN) plays?

    If this so called "baby nurse" does something wrong, guess who she'll be misrepresenting?? Not her, but the whole nursing profession!! I do believe that if she has something that proves that she is a nurse (license) she must show it, if not she should stop using the nurse part.
  5. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from jlsRN
    Dr Laura uses the title 'doctor', implying that she is a doctor in the medical sense, when she really isn't.
    Dr. Laura has a doctoral degree under her belt; therefore, she is legally allowed to use the title of 'doctor.' Even though she is not an MD or DO, she is a doctor by virtue of her Ph.D degree, so her utilization of the title of 'doctor' is perfectly acceptable. It's the same issue with Dr. Phil.
  6. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Dr. Laura has a doctoral degree under her belt; therefore, she is legally allowed to use the title of 'doctor.' Even though she is not an MD or DO, she is a doctor by virtue of her Ph.D degree, so her utilization of the title of 'doctor' is perfectly acceptable. It's the same issue with Dr. Phil.
    OT-

    Yeah that!

    Even though Dr Laura and Dr. Phil give horrid advice we shouldn't take away their 'doctor' creds! LOL!

    j/k
  7. by   Jolie
    It seems to me that the issue here is this: petitioning states that don't currently do so to protect the term "nurse". I don't believe that she is doing anything illegal, since she refers to her services by a different term in states which protect the word "nurse". Rather than raise a fuss over her legal activity, it seems more productive to direct one's energy toward changing the conditions that allow her to use the term "nurse" in some locations.
  8. by   elkpark
    I still just don't care ...

    And, frankly, I think it makes the entire nursing community look kind of petty and defensive when we get our collective panties in a wad whenever something like this comes up, like the Parade article that made the comment that you didn't need a college degree to become an RN (which is, technically speaking, a true statement), as was discussed ad infinitum (ad nauseum) on this board). Don't we have bigger fish to fry?? Are we that insecure about our professional identities that we feel threatened by this woman?

    "The lady doth protest too much, methinks ..."
  9. by   MA Nurse
    I think she should use the title "mother's helper" or just "baby nanny"...but i do think nurse isn't right. At least they clarify that she is not an RN.
  10. by   MA Nurse
    Quote from elkpark
    I still just don't care ...

    And, frankly, I think it makes the entire nursing community look kind of petty and defensive when we get our collective panties in a wad whenever something like this comes up, like the Parade article that made the comment that you didn't need a college degree to become an RN (which is, technically speaking, a true statement), as was discussed ad infinitum (ad nauseum) on this board). Don't we have bigger fish to fry?? Are we that insecure about our professional identities that we feel threatened by this woman?

    "The lady doth protest too much, methinks ..."
    I think the issue is, some parents might look to her for medical advice because she uses the title nurse. I don't think it's because we RN's are insecure. She sounds like a nanny, and should use that title.
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from elkpark
    I still just don't care ...

    And, frankly, I think it makes the entire nursing community look kind of petty and defensive when we get our collective panties in a wad whenever something like this comes up, like the Parade article that made the comment that you didn't need a college degree to become an RN (which is, technically speaking, a true statement), as was discussed ad infinitum (ad nauseum) on this board). Don't we have bigger fish to fry?? Are we that insecure about our professional identities that we feel threatened by this woman?

    "The lady doth protest too much, methinks ..."
    I can and do fry small and large fish, at the same time, in the same pan, i.e. involvement in plenty of "big" and "small" nursing issues. And it has nothing to do with insecurity.


    Heaven help it when someone believes something isn't right that someone just has to think it has to do with insecurity!
    Last edit by Marie_LPN, RN on Sep 19, '07
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from Kimbalou
    I think the issue is, some parents might look to her for medical advice because she uses the title nurse.
    I agree.
  13. by   teeituptom
    Quote from Kimbalou
    I think the issue is, some parents might look to her for medical advice because she uses the title nurse. I don't think it's because we RN's are insecure. She sounds like a nanny, and should use that title.
    Like the Nanny that Tiger Woods married

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