Woman with nursing license advertises as "Baby Nurse" - page 2

and publication in the Washington Post: I found out about this woman through the Center for Nursing Advocacy and thought I would share with the community here. This woman would be better suited... Read More

  1. by   njbikernurse
    Jeez, this really does annoy me. People are already confused about nurses. I've had several people ask me if I'm a real nurse because my badge says LPN, and they don't know what that is. Hmmmmmm, there's an email address. What if a few people sent her a few emails asking her to stop calling herself a nurse? Is that some kind of harassment or anything?
  2. by   jjjoy
    While I can understand the reasoning to protect the title of "nurse" it occupies a place in our language that isn't as unique as "doctor" or "lawyer" - which follows the historical development of nursing as a career.

    The most basic of nursing care doesn't demand a lot of training and for a long time, such basic tasks were the bulk of a nurse's work. Some people, of course, had more expertise or skills, but the minimal requirements generally consisted of a willingness to assist with ADLs - whether that was child care, elder care or sick care - and ideally assist with compassion and skill. Some doctors also used nurses as assistive personnel. Thus, when people see assistants in the doctor's office, they assume he/she is a nurse.

    However, as medical care has increased in complexity and people are able to survive longer with more health problems, the nurse's role in many settings has increased in complexity. So who is the "real" nurse? Can we limit the term to just those with formal training and licensure?

    What about the historical uses of the term nurse? When we see references to the "children's nurse" or the infant's "wet nurse" in a well-to-do household, do we need to point out that they aren't talking about "real" nurses?

    When a nurse is bathing or feeding a patient, maybe we should call it "ADL care" and not nursing care, since one needn't nurse's training to perform such tasks. Otherwise, of course patients get confused about who the nurse is... isn't it the person who bathes them? who hands out their meds? who makes sure they are comfortable? That person might be a nurse but is more likely a NA in many facilities.

    I'm just tossing thoughts out there about the use of the term "nurse." I personally think it's asking too much to try to redefine what "nurse" means to society and that it would be easier to have another title that distinguishes the skilled/trained medical nurse as such. For example, if someone is a "Registered Nurse" one knows that they have attended a formal training program and have passed state examinations to qualify.
    Last edit by jjjoy on Sep 18, '07
  3. by   imenid37
    She is pitching herself as having special expertise drawing from various disciplines, for example lactation and early childhood ed. In other words, she is not just going to give the children a bath and brush their hair. She is pitching this "baby nurse" as being something w/ a special body of knowledge and skills. Not to mention that multiples are often preemies and are often medically fragile. She could use this "expertise" to tell parents these children are sick, not sick, developing normally, not developing normally, etc. It is just a little too close to real nursing for an unlicensed person to be making these claims. If she wants to market herself as a domestic, nanny, or mom's helper that would be more appropriate.
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    If she wants to be known as a baby "nurse," she needs to go to nursing school, then take the NCLEX and pass it.
  5. by   FireStarterRN
    I guess to me it's not a big deal, but I see you points. It personally doesn't bother me, I think of the word nurse as being a more general one and think of 'RN' as being my title.
  6. by   pickledpepperRN
    Maryland Code > Health Occupations > Title 8. Nurses .
    8-703. Misrepresentation.

    (a) In general.-

    (6) (b) Certain representations prohibited.- Unless authorized to practice registered nursing or licensed practical nursing under this title, a person may not use the word "nurse" to describe the profession of the person.

    http://www.mbon.org/main.php?v=norm&...ctice_act.html
  7. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from jjjoy
    When a nurse is bathing or feeding a patient, maybe we should call it "ADL care" and not nursing care, since one needn't nurse's training to perform such tasks. .
    I am certain that when you are performing ADL's you are also assessing, teaching, evaluating, and planning care. In otherwords you are performing the Nursing Process not simply a task.
  8. by   FireStarterRN
    It's just that I see this woman as using the word nurse in the British sense of the word, as in 'nursemaid', such as in Mary Poppins being a nanny. I think a baby nurse can mean a nanny. To me the word can mean nanny.
  9. by   jmgrn65
    Quote from elkpark
    Okay -- she states on her website that, in some states, the generic term "nurse" is legally protected, and in those states, people that do what she does are known as "Newborn Specialists." So what?

    I guarantee you that anyone savvy enough to set up a business where she gets paid $28/hour for, essentially, babysitting is savvy enough to make sure that she's not breaking any laws or state regulations in doing so ...
    I don't really care so much if it is legal or not! It shouldn't be, its the fact that we worked hard and earned our nursing license and as far as I am concerned the word Nurse belongs to nursing and we own it. as i have already said.
  10. by   jmgrn65
    Quote from jlsRN
    It's just that I see this woman as using the word nurse in the British sense of the word, as in 'nursemaid', such as in Mary Poppins being a nanny. I think a baby nurse can mean a nanny. To me the word can mean nanny.
    except we are not in a British sense, we are in AMERICA, the last I checked. THey also call Nurses 'Sister' in england.
  11. by   caroladybelle
    One can ask why she did not just use the term "Nanny" or "Sitter"... and we all know the reason why. Because it doesnt sound as good or as professional to use those terms.

    She is clearly using the term "BabyNurse" to imply that she has more education/skills than she does, and to give her an edge over "Nanny" or "Babysitter", so that she can charge more.
  12. by   classicdame
    It is against the law in Texas to call yourself a nurse unless you are duly licensed. In fact, the state attorney general handles these cases to protect the public from unprofessional people.
  13. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from caroladybelle
    One can ask why she did not just use the term "Nanny" or "Sitter"... and we all know the reason why. Because it doesnt sound as good or as professional to use those terms.

    She is clearly using the term "BabyNurse" to imply that she has more education/skills than she does, and to give her an edge over "Nanny" or "Babysitter", so that she can charge more.

    Exactly.

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