Why Medicine Can't Seem to Fix Simple Mistakes

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    NYU's Langone Medical Center announced this week that it was adopting new procedures after the death of a 12-year old boy from septic shock. The hospital's emergency room sent Rory Staunton home in March and then failed to notify his doctor or family of lab results showing he was suffering from a raging infection.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/propub...b_1689803.html
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  3. 3 Comments so far...

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    that is one of the very saddest things I've seen in a long time. When I read about his Vital signs a few weeks ago, I felt outrage, but then I tried to remember everything in hindsight is super clear.

    You only get so much time to treat in septic shock (like the Golden Hour of trauma)...so I hope his death makes a difference for thousands in the future. BUT...just think, what he might have done with his life- we will never know.
    elprup likes this.
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    Quote from sauconyrunner
    that is one of the very saddest things I've seen in a long time. When I read about his Vital signs a few weeks ago, I felt outrage, but then I tried to remember everything in hindsight is super clear.

    You only get so much time to treat in septic shock (like the Golden Hour of trauma)...so I hope his death makes a difference for thousands in the future. BUT...just think, what he might have done with his life- we will never know.
    If you want to get an idea of what the general public thinks about medical care and hospitals Google the NYT original article and the responses by readers.

    While some physicans, nurses and others upheld the treatment this poor youngster had, others including the public are ready to storm NYU/Langone and with rope and a flatbed truck.
    Sisyphus and elprup like this.
  6. 3
    This article challenges me as a nurse. I work in a skilled nursing facility where our medicare patients are getting more and more acute. With 12 to 15 patients it can be very hard to meet all the needs let alone fully assess patients who may have subtle changes. But it is those subtle changes that mean the difference between life and death.

    The last two days that I worked I recognized some problems with three patients that needed more attention. I ended out working 4 hours over in order to complete the paperwork required. I found myself a lttle angry when people were saying "are you still here?" I was given 15 patients, and those patients deserved the best care I could give them. But in truth, only the most acute ones got my best care.

    As I said, this article demonstrates to me that every patient needs a nurse who will watch out for him or her.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/propub...b_1689803.html[/QUOTE]
    Sisyphus, elprup, and sauconyrunner like this.


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