what the heck is CRE???

  1. 0
    Another nightmare germ...is this like C-diff on steroids? Does purell kill it or is it strictly soap and h2o?
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  3. 13 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Several Enterobacteriacea strains have been isolated which are resistant to antibiotics including carbapenem, which has been described as "the last line of antibiotic defense" against resistant organisms.
    CRE, which stands for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, are a family of germs that are difficult to treat because they have high levels of resistance to antibiotics. Klebsiella species and Escherichia coli (E. coli) are examples of Enterobacteriaceae, a normal part of the human gut bacteria, that can become carbapenem-resistant. Types of CRE are sometimes known as KPC (Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase) and NDM (New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase). KPC and NDM are enzymes that break down carbapenems and make them ineffective.
    Healthy people usually do not get CRE infections. In healthcare settings, CRE infections most commonly occur among patients who are receiving treatment for other conditions. Patients whose care requires devices like ventilators (breathing machines), urinary (bladder) catheters, or intravenous (vein) catheters, and patients who are taking long courses of certain antibiotics are most at risk for CRE infections.
    CDC - Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae - HAI

    The Enterobacteriaceae is a large family of Gram-negative bacteria that include many of the more familiar pathogens, such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Yersinia pestis, Klebsiella and Shigella. Other disease-causing bacteria in this family include Proteus, Enterobacter, Serratia, and Citrobacter.

    Carbapenems are a class of β-lactam antibiotics with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. They have a structure that renders them highly resistant to most β-lactamases Imipenem, Meropenem, Monobactam, Ertapenem (Invanz), Aztreonam (Azactam).
    CDC - Patient information about CRE - HAI
  5. 0
    So this is Contact Isolation~~ gown gloves...Purell OR hand wash per CDC...still not sure if its a spore I don't think so if purell kills it...
  6. 0
    What are you asking......?

    If you look at the references I gave you would know that answer...here are some more...Enterobacter aerogenes - MicrobeWiki and Chapter 16 - Enterobacteriaceae http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...,d.dmQ&cad=rja
  7. 0
    I can certainly research it. I was trying to get conversation on the new CRE. Experiences and how hospitals are dealing with it if they're even seeing it at all yet...looks like contact
  8. 0
    Anyone take care of a patient with this new super bug CRE yet?
  9. 0
    I took care of a patient last year as a student who had CRE and resulting Klebsiella pneumonia. He was post-stroke and total care, I believe he had been hospitalized for at least a month prior to me seeing him. Contact precautions with mask. From what I understood, and don't quote me (as I said this was a year ago), they basically couldn't treat either infection. Really sad.
  10. 0
    Also, soap and water definitely. I washed once in the pt room bathroom after de-gowning, and again at the sink in the hallway.
  11. 0
    Quote from jordinriess
    I took care of a patient last year as a student who had CRE and resulting Klebsiella pneumonia. He was post-stroke and total care, I believe he had been hospitalized for at least a month prior to me seeing him. Contact precautions with mask. From what I understood, and don't quote me (as I said this was a year ago), they basically couldn't treat either infection. Really sad.
    That is incredibly sad...Vanco is usually the go to for the nasty super bugs...even vanco doesn't work? :'(
  12. 0
    Quote from lkulmann

    That is incredibly sad...Vanco is usually the go to for the nasty super bugs...even vanco doesn't work? :'(
    I'm guessing they tried since he had been there for a long stay but I don't remember it being successful. He was quite sick, baseline was nonverbal, responsive to painful stimuli, etc. The massive infection was really only adding insult to injury at that point.


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