Washington Hospital Center fires 16 for snowstorm absences

  1. 2
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...l?hpid=topnews

    When I read the article, I couldn't help but wonder if it had anything to do with age and the hospital trying to cut costs.
    tsalagicara and dscrn like this.
  2. 47,928 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 200 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Threads merged.
  5. 25
    I personally hate when nurses call out for a snow storm especially if it's less than a foot of snow (I know that in this case it was a huge blizzard). The reason I feel that way is that one has to stay late or work a double to cover for that nurse who didn't show up. Why take a job like nursing when you know you have to be there no matter what!

    I've lived in various snow states and have had my husband help clean out the drive way, leave my house 3 - 4 hours early, and drive 25 - 35 miles/hr so I can get to work in a snow storm.

    I know your safety comes first but why is it fair for you to stay home when everyone else is in the same boat as you, and yet somehow they show up for work?!?
    Orca, rikkitikki, mama_d, and 22 others like this.
  6. 46
    People call in for all kinds of reasons. Calling in because of dangerous driving conditions is a good reason. You said it, safety comes first.
    himilayaneyes, TriciaJ, CCL RN, and 43 others like this.
  7. 17
    I think it depends on a case to case situation. If a individual has a bad call in record then yea they diserve to be reprimanded. its not fair when others are waiting to go home and have made the effort to make it to work. but if it is someone who never calls out then they should be forgiven because they have probly covered many times for all the others who call in all the time.
    TriciaJ, oliviajolie, tvccrn, and 14 others like this.
  8. 17
    SAFETY COMES FIRST !! , by driving in such adverse conditions not only do you put your life at risk ( OK your choice ) , but you also put the lives of other emergency workers at risk , when they have to come to rescue you when you get into trouble in the storm ( they have little / no choice ). As you say you know what may happen when you take a nursing job in a snow area , but the safest thing for all is for you to stay home and the nurses at the hospital remain there until conditions improve enough for all to travel .
    TriciaJ, CCL RN, tsalagicara, and 14 others like this.
  9. 15
    I live in the DC Metro Area.. I would not say this is a "snow state" as someone upthread mentioned. In the last 3 winters we've only had 10 inches of snow combined. So this storm caught us all by surprise. The streets were another thing entirely. The state roads were plowed, but when it came to neighborhoods, many of them were not plowed until several days after the storm stopped. And finally the Metro service was shut down for a couple of days. These are all reasons why it could have been impossible for people to make it to work. Many hospitals in this area were requesting 4X4 vehicles to help get people to work, but I don't know if they received the help or not.
    TriciaJ, CCL RN, tsalagicara, and 12 others like this.
  10. 8
    I would receive a phone call stating that if you called out, you could and would face disciplinary action. I was also asked if I needed transportation to the hospital. Volunteers with 4x4's were transporting staff.
    beshacohen, GLB_68, shanyone, and 5 others like this.
  11. 5
    Well, IMO (don't bash me, please *ducks*), a call in is a call in. That's the policy where I work, anyway. They don't care about the reason...weather, sick, etc. So, if you were on the edge of being fired anyway, and called in, it wouldn't matter if snow or a cold or a hangover were the reason. It's your choice to do so. I know my road doesn't get plowed when it storms here, so I may have to call in for a blizzard someday, too, but that's a risk that I run.
    CraigB-RN, juliaann, canoehead, and 2 others like this.
  12. 39
    Quote from EmilyLucille523
    I personally hate when nurses call out for a snow storm especially if it's less than a foot of snow (I know that in this case it was a huge blizzard). The reason I feel that way is that one has to stay late or work a double to cover for that nurse who didn't show up. Why take a job like nursing when you know you have to be there no matter what!

    I've lived in various snow states and have had my husband help clean out the drive way, leave my house 3 - 4 hours early, and drive 25 - 35 miles/hr so I can get to work in a snow storm.

    I know your safety comes first but why is it fair for you to stay home when everyone else is in the same boat as you, and yet somehow they show up for work?!?
    I remember one time my husband got up at 4 Am -he shoveled us out and the plow came by and socked us in. He chased the truck and made the driver open the driveway. I would not let him stop for coffee. I was the first one in at work and I came the furtherest away! Was it appreciated, no.

    Another time, I left home very early, I was the first one in hours before the others, I overheard her state she was mad that I didn't come in, while in fact I was there much earlier then her.

    I have been in two car accidents and both times in was in snow and people plowed into me, is getting to work worth my life ? I don't think so,.

    I say, the nurse should make every effort, but in the long run no one should be fired. The only exception would be if the hospital provided pick up service and has arrangements for the nurses to sleep. No way should nurses be fired.
    CCL RN, tsalagicara, oliviajolie, and 36 others like this.


Top