Was famed nurse Nightingale bipolar? - page 2

This article is from: May. 02, 2003 but still thought it was worthy of posting for discussion: Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing who said God called her to her work, "heard... Read More

  1. Visit  Cherish profile page
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    I don't know if she had bipolar or not (it doesn't matter she accomplished A LOT!). I do think that she may have had PTSD, but many people would have had this if they went through the ordeals she did. I think everyone will remember her for the service she provided man(wo-)kind, not on if she had a mental illness.
  2. Visit  prmenrs profile page
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    I once met a DNSc, dean of a School of Nursing--her dissertation was on Flo!!! Hard to imagine!
  3. Visit  CCU NRS profile page
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    I have my doubts but who can tell it sort of like Joan of Arc being schizophrenic how can anyone know now. The Dr Hall summed it up best saying it is an interesting parlor game.
  4. Visit  veteranRN profile page
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    :angryfire just another attempt to label people:angryfire
  5. Visit  stressednurse profile page
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    Maybe she had an autoimmune disease such as Lupus, MS or MD that would also wax and wane. Maybe she just needed Motrin and it wasnt invented yet. She was a very self motivated person no matter what medical or mental diagnosis fits her. She started the career that I follow, so she is the best!
  6. Visit  smk1 profile page
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    does anyone else wonder why these experts don't spend more time working on acutal, current problems instead of wondering about issues that are long past and have no findable answer now?
  7. Visit  wmarat profile page
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    Quote from VickyRN
    On the other hand, what if God really does speak to people?
    Why, when I talk to G-d it's called a pray and when G-d talks to me it's called schizophrenia?
  8. Visit  VickyRN profile page
    0
    Quote from wmarat
    Why, when I talk to G-d it's called a pray and when G-d talks to me it's called schizophrenia?
    In our Western "intellectual" mindset, we pride ourselves on our rationality and tend to leave out the spiritual aspect. If we cannot define something with our five senses, then the occurrence must not be real. Unfortunately for the Western paradigm, the spiritual world, both good and bad, surrounds us, and it is very real. Much more real than this temporal physical experience.
    Therefore, to the Western intellectual, contact with the spiritual world is considered "abnormal," even a form of mental illness. To the Eastern mindset, the spiritual part of the human experience is very real and normal.
    The human being is actually a tripartite being--we are an eternal spirit which is housed in a temporal body and we have a soul (which is our mind, will, and emotions). If we ignore the human spirit, we are leaving out the most important part--and we are only addressing 66.67% of who we are (on any examination, 66.67% is FLUNKING. ).
    So sad, in our Western quest for rationality and logic, we don't even know who we really are.
    Last edit by VickyRN on Apr 16, '04
  9. Visit  nightengayle profile page
    1
    You say that like its a bad thing....bipolar is a disorder, and many gifted people have been afflicted with it. Many of us have disorders, diseases, flaws and dysfunctions. I dont think it is name calling, just an article someone found who thought it was interesting to post it. I have a close relative who has bipolar, she is very intelligent and gifted in many ways. The bipolar has its times when it is awful and unpleasant but with the right meds and psychotherapy she is well adapted.




    Quote from teeituptom
    Cant we accept her for who and what she represents without tranishing her image.

    Enough name calling and mud slinging as is.

    Lets not add to it
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
  10. Visit  nightmare profile page
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    Hi everyone in allnurses.com.This is my first post here.
    I wonder how many of us,if put under the microscope would come out "sane"?
    Florence must certainly have suffered from some form of traumatic syndrome but the point is she learned from her experiences and built on them,bringing nursing respectability and profesionalism.How many other people have gone through great life changing episodes in their lives and made a difference? Are they all going to by examined mentally or are we going to thank God for their farsightedness?

    (gets down off soap box and wanders back in her corner mumbling to herself)!
  11. Visit  teeituptom profile page
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    Quote from nightmare
    Hi everyone in allnurses.com.This is my first post here.
    I wonder how many of us,if put under the microscope would come out "sane"?
    Florence must certainly have suffered from some form of traumatic syndrome but the point is she learned from her experiences and built on them,bringing nursing respectability and profesionalism.How many other people have gone through great life changing episodes in their lives and made a difference? Are they all going to by examined mentally or are we going to thank God for their farsightedness?

    (gets down off soap box and wanders back in her corner mumbling to herself)!

    Im sure someone could say Im severely Obsessive Compulsive about Golf
  12. Visit  Jrnalist2RNinOR profile page
    0
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Well, being bipolar is NOT a crime or a character defect, you know. Many bipolar folks are brilliant, high-functioning and wonderful people. Sheesh what ignorance we still hold about mental health these days. It really upsets me this is even a concern at this point. I would like to leave the woman and her memory alone. One thing to consider: In another time and another culture (certain native American ones) schizophrenics and folks who would have been classified bipolar were believed to be seers of considerable wisdom. Maybe, just maybe, they were right.

    Thank you BluEyes you brought up a very good point and that is that being BiPolar is not necessarily a disability but only made her who she was... (IMHO)

    I feel that is also true for the Savant (autistics) who are brilliant people and other individuals that society may sometimes incorrectly label as disabled but in reality they are truly very talented and bright individuals...
  13. Visit  NICU_RNwantsFL profile page
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    Quote from stevielynn
    I think the letters posted in the article sound like many teens and women, even nowadays. When I was a teenager I constantly wondered about the meaning of life and wrote in my journal and if you looked at it now could probably diagnose all kinds of mental illnesses. :chuckle

    The fact that she had periods of depression, well, welcome to the real world.

    Not discounting those who truly are bipolar but looking back in time and trying to diagnose from personal writings seems a bit far-fetched to me.

    steph
    Hi, Stevielynn -

    Maybe I am just tired, but I cannot for the life of me figure out what is in the picture below your screenname!!! Help, please???
    Thanks!


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