Warning Signs Of Nurses Addicted To Drugs - page 2

by brian Admin

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here is a news story with video an increasing number of delaware valley nurses are addicted to drugs and they're using on job. investigative reporter jim osman warns us of a sign that a nurse could be swiping medication meant... Read More


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    Having been accused of diverting meds by a disgruntled co-worker after he was fired for sleeping on the job, I can point out another side to those of us nurses who happen to sign out more narcotics. (By the way, I was cleared of any wrongdoing because of my belief in good documentation.) Having been trained in effective pain management as a hospice nurse, I of course make that one of the priorities of my assessments. Pain, if not recognized or addressed, snowballs into many other symptoms. Many doctors undermedicate unless we nurses advocate for the patient with poor pain control. Unfortunately, too, I see many nurses with the outdated attitude that they will cause their patients to become addicts, or that the patients are "sissies" or drug-seekers. Yes, signing out more meds than other nurses is a red flag, but not always. A shame to have to be nervous about it, but a fact of our profession.


    KEEP ON ROCKING IN THE FREE WORLD!!!!!!!!!!
  2. 0
    Quote from juliebean4u
    Having been accused of diverting meds by a disgruntled co-worker after he was fired for sleeping on the job, I can point out another side to those of us nurses who happen to sign out more narcotics. (By the way, I was cleared of any wrongdoing because of my belief in good documentation.) Having been trained in effective pain management as a hospice nurse, I of course make that one of the priorities of my assessments. Pain, if not recognized or addressed, snowballs into many other symptoms. Many doctors undermedicate unless we nurses advocate for the patient with poor pain control. Unfortunately, too, I see many nurses with the outdated attitude that they will cause their patients to become addicts, or that the patients are "sissies" or drug-seekers. Yes, signing out more meds than other nurses is a red flag, but not always. A shame to have to be nervous about it, but a fact of our profession.


    KEEP ON ROCKING IN THE FREE WORLD!!!!!!!!!!
    I'm a believer. I'm right there with you. But don't get me wrong. That might move you down the standard deviation line but you'd still prob be within the bell curve. A diverter would be off the chart.

    There is normally enough space between diversion and pain control advocate to segregate the bad apples from the good.

    I'll say this, I have a habit of pulling up the administration histories on all my pts on the machine before I leave. One time I found that somebody gave a narc for one of MY pts that I knew nothing about, I wrote it up. Turns out it was a mistake that he meant to punch the name above my pt and they were both on the same narc so he didn't realize the mistake. And I believe him. But pharmacy tore apart his access record before THEY believed him.

    The only other time I found out in my history that someone had given a narc in my pt's name was an agency nurse that worked for 1 day - and in that day diverted 22 narcs from pts he wasn't taking care of (and who knows how many from the ones actually assigned to him!) Pharmacy didn't need my help to piece that together.

    But somebody sloppy enough to divert a med from one of my pts will end up having some 'splaining to do.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
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    I wonder how many realise that impaired nurses do not divert or steal from their patients? And that many do not use at work?

    Grannynurse
  4. 1
    Quote from grannynurse FNP student
    I wonder how many realise that impaired nurses do not divert or steal from their patients? And that many do not use at work?

    Grannynurse
    Many do divert. Some don't - and using technology like the pyxis is no substitute for good judgement by peers. The old saying holds true here too: treat the person, not the machine.

    And the ones that don't use at work - it depends on the situation.

    Do I personally have a problem with the social pot smoker that toked up on friday night and it is out of their system and they are unimpaired Monday morning? No.

    But until we discover a way to determine how long ago pot entered your system, you have to ban it.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    DeLanaHarvickWannabe likes this.
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    It is just too bad that we have to be discussing this subject at all, but while we're at it , what could be some tell-tale signs?:uhoh21: :uhoh21: I strongly suspect a co-worker. She is clever, though, and has her head up the supervisor's soft spot. I am just so afraid she will screw things up. I am taking all the hours I can get outside of my regular speciality which I love. We have a pixis. Any way I can confirm my suspicions?
    Not paranoid or anything,
    Kadokin
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    Random urine screens don't work either, a little Lasix and B12 and you can hide anything. Maybe the hair test would work but I have heard they are very very expensive.
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    Quote from RNKITTY04
    Random urine screens don't work either, a little Lasix and B12 and you can hide anything. Maybe the hair test would work but I have heard they are very very expensive.
    Hair tests are useful for detecting chronic use but are no substitute for a random test. Random tests do work because people are caught all the time. However, people should know that a routine urine screen does not detect Fentanyl. If Fentanyl is believed to be the drug of choice it must be indicated on the specimen. If anyone suspects a nurse of diverting drugs from a pyxis then pharmacy must be notified and they will do the initial investigation. If someone is behaving wacko at work the urine should be tested immediately. Refusal can be grounds for reporting the nurse. It might be enough of a carrot to get someone into treatment and enrolled in a non-punitive program. If they refuse treatment then its reportable to the disciplinary agency.


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