Wal-Mart to open 400 in-store clinics - page 4

Wal-Mart to open 400 in-store clinics. Isn't CVS doing the same? The article didn't say whether they were going to employ doctors or nurse practitioners, or what services they will offer.... Read More

  1. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from jyoung1950
    Skipping Work Breaks. In 2000, an internal Wal-Mart audit found that of 128 stores, 127 of them were "not in compliance" with company policies providing for work breaks. [Indiana Lawyer, 5/7/03.]


    Well, then Walmart is no better than the hospitals we all work at when it comes to breaks. I've witnessed more nurses not being able to take their lunch breaks at the hospital I work at than have been able to.
    And I would add to this that I'm sure Wal-Mart is not the only employer or corporation guilty of this stuff - it just so happens they're the biggest.
  2. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from dria
    give me a break!!! these are independently trained, independently licensed nps (unless walmart has opened a school of nursing that i'm not aware of)
    scan the forums on allnurses and note the large # of forums decrying the lack of affordable, accessible healthcare and the need for np autonomy. now that someone is actually improving access to timely affordable healthcare, reducing unnecessary er utilization, and acknowledged the ability of nps to function without an md looking over their shoulder, are we as nurses really going to sit and wring our hands and wonder if its a good idea? puh-leeze!!!! i also see no conflict of interest regarding their location near a pharmacy...that's kind of like saying that it's a conflict of interest for a hospital to have a pharmacy in house....i don't see the difference. if you really want to get rid of conflicts of interest in prescribing medications.....get rid of the drug reps.
    yes yes yesssss....i love this post and want to print it to put on my fridge...i love this post!!! my point exactly.

    i would say the reasons for it being near the pharmacy are twofold - yes, to increase the likelihood that the patient will use the pharmacy there - but think about it, folks - if you feel like crap, and you have no insurance, and you go into wal-mart to get yourself some tylenol - where's the tylenol? it's not back with the shoes - it's at the pharmacy! so you go over to the pharmacy, get your tylenol, and there's a friendly looking man or woman sitting in a little office, the fee is only $50, and you've felt like crap for a week....so you fill out the paperwork....

    you won't attract sick people by sticking a clinic in with the underwear and socks. go where the sick folks are - red-eyed and miserable, wandering aimlessly amongst the benadryl and the laxatives....
    Last edit by carolinapooh on May 5, '07
  3. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from Indy
    I think they should also staff a social worker in order to direct new patients who need long term followup for disease, to a doc that can help them and also to agencies that can help them. It wouldn't make sense to refer without making sure that the referral is appropriate and doable for the patient.
    So why can't NPs do this? Isn't that part of the DEAL? Can't the NP refer them to a social worker, or have information on hand about other programs to help pay for medical expenses? I would bet the NP could get the person to talk to them quicker than a social worker.

    So I ask again - an NP can't do that? When I was told they couldn't help me with my stomach flu at CVS, they specifically asked me if I had insurance or access to other care that I could afford. They ALREADY DO THIS here. I doubt an NP worth their credentials would just turn a patient out without trying to help as much as possible.
  4. by   Jolie
    Originally Posted by Indy
    I think they should also staff a social worker in order to direct new patients who need long term followup for disease, to a doc that can help them and also to agencies that can help them. It wouldn't make sense to refer without making sure that the referral is appropriate and doable for the patient.

    I also disagree that this is necessary, for 2 reasons:

    Most people are capable of following the provider's instructions for a referral. It is a little condescending to assume that Wal-Mart Clinic patients would need a social worker to walk them thru the process of calling a doctor's office or clinic to make a future appointment for specialty care. Most people fail to make appointments on their own because they don't want to, not because they don't know how. On the rare occasion that a patient truly needs assistance in making a referral appointment, I am sure that the NP or PA is quite capable of providing assistance, or sending them to the ER where their complex needs can be met.

    Secondly, if we start to require a whole bunch of support people in walk-in clinics, they will rapidly become too expensive for the average Joe. The reason these clinics can offer $45 dollar visits is because they are paid upfront (no expense in billing insurance and WAITING for payment), and because they run on miminal staffing. If the public begins to demand the presence of additional staff members such as social workers, billing specialists, etc., the price will go way up.
  5. by   noggin_wise
    Apparently some people on here would complain no matter what Wal-Mart did. Wal-Mart does a lot for the communities they serve. They add these clinics for convenience and a cheaper alternative for their customers. Why the need by some on here to bash the company without any real facts is amazing.
  6. by   mcubed45
    Quote from noggin_wise
    Apparently some people on here would complain no matter what Wal-Mart did. Wal-Mart does a lot for the communities they serve. They add these clinics for convenience and a cheaper alternative for their customers. Why the need by some on here to bash the company without any real facts is amazing.
    most people are pretty ignorant of how macro-economics work. all they see is the smaller (more expensive) businesses shutting down. they assume this is bad b/c they feel bad for the mom&pop stores and try to get people to boycott walmart. this goes against everything that makes a capitalistic, free-competition, economy function. people b*tch about high prices in every aspect of life, yet when a company comes along with a business model which allows them to give the LOWEST prices on the market people complain that their business practices are too aggressive.

    these are the same ignorant people that complain about outsourcing without realizing the overall BENEFIT to giving low-level jobs to other countires with a lower oppurtunity cost. what happens when there's no low-level jobs available here? it forces people to get a higher education and seek more specialized jobs. end result: a country with a higher level of education and specialization. bad huh?

    competition always benefits the consumer and inevitably only the most efficient (ie lowest oppurtunity cost) businesses survive in the long run. bottom line - the small businesses are inefficient. this is why they cannot compete. by forcing them to close and move to a different market a more efficient allocation of resources is achieved in the overall economy. yes it sucks for them but it benefits everyone in the long run.
    Last edit by mcubed45 on May 12, '07
  7. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from mcubed45
    all they see is the smaller (more expensive) businesses shutting down. they assume this is bad b/c they feel bad for the mom&pop stores and try to get people to boycott walmart.
    Hey, they did that here long before Wal*Mart came in. As you know, wasn't WM's fault that people are now mobile.

    Get people back to those horse and carriage days and then we'll see Main Street flouish again.
  8. by   NurseRotten
    I took my daughter to a Ready Clinic in a supermarket in suburban Houston for an uncomplicated case of conjunctivitis. We were in and out in under 30 minutes. In addition, she did not have to miss school and I did not have to miss work.

    Wal-mart rules. Where else can you get a haircut, new glasses, a pedicure, deposit your paycheck, pick up your prescription, have your oil changed, grab a bite to eat, pick up groceries for later, check your hearing aid, and mail a package? Wal-mart helps me multi-task.
  9. by   smk1
    I am not a big fan of Walmart in general, but I have to say that, continuity of care issues aside, this is a good thing for the under insured population. Out where I am it costs 140-250 dollars to go into urgent care or make an appointment at a clinic that takes self-pay patients. Who wants to spend that for someone to tell you what you already probably know? (ear infection, bronchitis, UTI etc...) I wonder how many people have ended up really sick in the ER because they put off seeking medical attention at a clinic/urgent care site because of the price? If they couldn't afford 200 dollars you know they can't afford 800 so the hospital is going to have to eat a lot of the cost of their emergent care. They then pass on their deficit to others by raising costs etc... Honestly, if the clinic is used for the basic purposes for which it was designed, it could help a lot of people.
  10. by   Kiringat
    Keeping in mind that they're not actually run or owned by Walmart, I'm a fan of the clinics. I've gotten most of my vaccinations and two TB tests there. They all cost less than through an MD's office, even with my crappy student insurance. I was also in and out within 15 minutes, and didn't have to fill out pages and pages of paperwork.
    Last edit by Kiringat on May 14, '07
  11. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from NurseRotten
    Wal-mart rules. Where else can you get a haircut, new glasses, a pedicure, deposit your paycheck, pick up your prescription, have your oil changed, grab a bite to eat, pick up groceries for later, check your hearing aid, and mail a package? Wal-mart helps me multi-task.
    You forgot pick up some ammo.
  12. by   zahryia
    I actually think fifty bucks is expensive; especially if you're low income. They need to bring it down five or ten bucks. .
  13. by   NurseRotten
    But the really low income people can get medicaid. The clinic would be for the working class uninsured.

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