Union asks nurses at the University of Massachusetts to OK strike - page 7

union asks nurses at the university of massachusetts to ok strike... Read More

  1. by   mekrn
    Quote from Ezra73
    AWESOME post!!! now that's what i am talking about. articulate and to the point without anger or emotional defensiveness. bravo.

    you see, i am not out to put myself in a higher position than others. i am just sick and tired of the large number of RNs that seem to act on emotion rather than logic. its ok to be "emotional," but not when you're in a position where one must bargain for this and that...then you just sound whiney and irritating.

    what spacenurse is saying is the #1 reason why RNs make the hospital work. i am in the ICU 10-20% of the day...AM rounds, afternoon checks, and if needed. the RN needs to be there all day making sure one's MAP stays between a certain range. this delicate balance of one's pressure could mean the difference between a good outcome and a bad one.

    i commend nurses like spacenurse that not only do their job well, but articulate it in a manner that commands respect.

    back to my point...if 100 RNs like spacenurse are on the street then who will be filling in his/her shoes to keep people like me from scratching my nose with surgical gloves on doing a bedside procedure? maybe a much less qualified RN...and that my friends puts people's lives in danger.
    As a matter of fact, since you brought it up, I found this response to Spacenurse to be quite condescending. As if Spacenurse's intelligence or ability to articulate needs to be validated by you. Please!:trout:
  2. by   bluesky
    Quote from Ezra73
    a strike of any kind by a healthcare provider (actually, its usually only RNs) disgusts me. it puts patients at risk...PERIOD.

    i could care less if a CEO makes over a million bucks. why not just be angry at every politician that uses our tax dollars to eat the finest foods, drink the finest wines, and travel in luxury jets and/or limos. being a CEO has its perks politically, socially, and with great monetary rewards. THIS IS WITH EVERY INSTITUTION IN EVERY INDUSTRY.

    the bottom-line is that quality RNs will walk out the door and leave patients at risk.

    almost every union RN here will blast me with some justification for striking, but it will fall on deaf ears because no matter how you attempt to explain yourself, the fact is that you are leaving the bed side. By taking your skills to the picket lines you are doing nothing more than putting patient's lives in danger. you will not be there and you will leave a nurse with less experience to do your job. then, you will blame the institution and/or CEO for this to cover up the fact that you just are sore that your own greed was not met with open arms by the employer that puts food on your table.
    Sorry but this theory simply isn't backed up by real world experience. I have been at 2 hospitals that had strikes and didn't suffer higher incidences of mortality or morbidity as a result. It just hurt admins pocketbooks because they had to pay twice as much for agency nurses to supply the same excellent care they would get any other day. AND furthermore, I now work agency and am far better and more experienced than when I was a newbie staff nurse stuck where I was. So WRONG on both fronts. The notion that agency nurses provide lower quality care is prejudiced and completely unfounded. I have all the ICU skills that spacenurse listed in her eloquent passage.

    And furthermore. quality patient care suffers FAR more as the result of the poor treatment of nurses without bargaining power. These include no sleep as the result of poor scheduling, exhaustion from overtime worked as a result of insufficent pay and benefits, unsafe care due to unreasonably heavy patient loads, and harrassment from poorly trained and unprofessional middle management.

    I suggest that you actually research the pay, benefits and working conditions of nurses. The notion that we are all spoiled and greedy making over $100,000 a year working only 36 hrs a week with full benefits is a complete fairy tale.
    Last edit by bluesky on Nov 7, '06
  3. by   Ezra73
    Quote from solidaritynurse
    As a matter of fact, since you brought it up, I found this response to Spacenurse to be quite condescending. As if Spacenurse's intelligence or ability to articulate needs to be validated by you. Please!:trout:


    you're really smart.
  4. by   Ezra73
    Quote from bluesky
    Sorry but this theory simply isn't backed up by real world experience. I have been at 2 hospitals that had strikes and didn't suffer higher incidences of mortality or morbidity as a result. It just hurt admins pocketbooks because they had to pay twice as much for agency nurses to supply the same excellent care they would get any other day. AND furthermore, I now work agency and am far better and more experienced than when I was a newbie staff nurse stuck where I was. So WRONG on both fronts. The notion that agency nurses provide lower quality care is prejudiced and completely unfounded.

    And furthermore. quality patient care suffers FAR more as the result of the poor treatment of nurses without bargaining power. These include no sleep as the result of poor scheduling, exhaustion from overtime worked as a result of insufficent pay and benefits, unsafe care due to unreasonably heavy patient loads, and harrassment from poorly trained and unprofessional middle management.
    so, you sit in on M&Ms for medical/surgical services before and after a strike? if so, then i stand corrected. oh wait, M&Ms are confidential to each service and not discussed with RNs. so, you wouldn't know. this is not meant to be condescending, but the fact is that M&Ms are very closed door in nature and nothing is repeated to anyone but those of us on the service itself.

    no sleep? as an RN, you're telling me that there have been times you were forced to work 24hrs? i don't know what to say. its not just me. i work with many people that put in multiple shifts in a row...and i mean 15hrs, 12hrs, 14hrs, a day off, back on 14hrs, etc.. these are NPs/PAs. not to mention the residents. the job gets done. i am happy. they are happy.

    i think it all boils down to the breeding and mentality of RNs versus the breeding and mentality of MDs (and/or those that practice under the medical model more so than the nursing model).

    do i always love management? no. do i feel like i am overworked a lot of times? yes. am i exhausted a lot of times? sure. do i feel like i have too many patients at times (20+)? absolutely. would i strike if given the choice? no. the people that would fill in for me would not be as good as i am at what i do and that would weigh heavy on my conscience.
  5. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from solidaritynurse
    Hang in there.
    You will be ok.
    YOU DO DESERVE MORE!

    www.picunurses.net/video.htm
    Fatigue causes errors.
    It is NOT OK for nurses to be mandated to work overtime.
    It is NOT OK for interns and residents to be forced into the brutal schedules they too often have. That is something the medical profession should address.

    The University of Massachusetts nurses and their supporters finally got strong floating language. That will save lives. I am an expert critical care nurse. I MUST NOT be assigned patients in L&D, peds, or NICU!
    Congratulations to the nurses who held out for your patients, your hospital, and OUR PROFESSION!

    RESPECT
    Beautiful nurses
  6. by   Uptoherern
    ...The union said the hospital is financially sound, pointing to a 38 percent raise chief executive John O'Brien received last year, bringing his total 2005 compensation to $1.27 million...

    I figured it out........Ezra73 is really John O'Brien. ha.
  7. by   MuddaMia
    Quote from erdiane

    I figured it out........Ezra73 is really John O'Brien. ha.

    :smackingf Its all so clear now!
  8. by   mekrn
    Please.... let us not awaken the sleeping beast!!!! :roll
  9. by   Ezra73
    Quote from solidaritynurse
    Please.... let us not awaken the sleeping beast!!!! :roll
    why not, it looks like the nurses in boston are prime to do what the nurses at umass did.

    nobody ever answered my question from before. do these executives at the MNA (who are so pleased to let the nurses strike...and egg it on actually), do they cash a paycheck during the strike? how nice. oh, and what a great "political" move by the MNA using umass as bargaining power. nurses getting treated like pawns in a political chess game.
  10. by   Patti 2nd gen RN
    Quote from JBudd
    Yeah, I left the bedside. I wasn't given enough people to care for the people in those beds. I did not put those people in danger, the administration did right up to the strike. No, somebody with less experience DID NOT take over. That is because we obeyed the law, gave our 10 day notice, and the administration CLEARED OUT the hospital. There were only 7 beds open, as well as the ER. When we went back in, we filled up again, with adequate care, staff and compensation, in a much safer place BECAUSE THE NURSES INSISTED ON IT. It was not greed, no matter what you say. Our pay remained less than the average in a nearby city (that has a lower cost of living). But conditions improved, significantly. My employer does not put food on my table, my labor does. Our entire city came out and supported us, from donuts to lunch wagons being sent to us.
    WOW!!!!GREAT!!! Thanks for standing up for our profession!!! I grew up with a mother who was nurse in NY and went on strike 3times while I lived at home--the state I live in now has very few unions, and nurses get walked on, and patient care suffers from the burnout this causes on a regular basis--as for the person who said it was not caring for our patients--it was the exact opposite--like with a loving parent--sometimes the best way to love is to set tough boundaries --tough love---that show forseight and responsibility. If we truly care about our patients, we will do what it takes to ensure their care for the future.

    Blessings!!

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