UK: 'Nice' nurses to get free chocolate biscuits - page 3

‘nice’ nurses to get free chocolate biscuits the sunday times - uk ... two years ago a resolution at the annual congress of the royal college of nursing proposed that nurses were now “too clever... Read More

  1. by   UKRNinUSA
    Quote from Mirth
    Sounds like the UK need a law like we have here. If you assault a health care worker in a hospital setting, you are treated as though you assaulted a police officer.

    That means you go to jail.
    Apparently not. We had an incident recently when one of our staff members was assaulted -we were told its a misdemeanour, that you had to make a citizen's arrest and that you risk a lawsuit from the offending party for false arrest if you pursue it. So I'm a bit confused on this one. The patient in question was just given a warning -it seemed to me she got off lightly.
  2. by   oldshoes
    Unfortunately, I've seen the "too posh to wash" thing in action- nurses, across all levels of education, who think every bit of difficult or dirty work should be someone else's job. Giving them chocolatey treats won't make them do their jobs better, because they don't care about their jobs in the first place. The ones who do care are already busting their rear ends.

    And it's such a cheesy little reward, too. I'm all for giving special recognition to those who go above and beyond, but being entered in a drawing for coffee and cookies? Really? How does that recognize those people who've really done an outstanding job?
    Last edit by oldshoes on Dec 5, '06 : Reason: added words
  3. by   aquaphoneRN
    This article is absolute disghusting.

    I would never even dream of being a nurse in the UK.

    In London, where the costs of living far exced New York City where I live, nurses are paid literally HALF of what I am paid. You call that POSH!?

    Take your cookie and shove it you-know-where.
  4. by   aquaphoneRN
    Does anyone have the email address of the Sunday Times where this article was published?

    I think we should all email them a complaint about Sarah-Kate Templeton's revulting article.
  5. by   Pachinko
    Where's my biskit da**it!!! :smilecoffeecup:
  6. by   DusktilDawn
    Quote from oldshoes
    Unfortunately, I've seen the "too posh to wash" thing in action- nurses, across all levels of education, who think every bit of difficult or dirty work should be someone else's job. Giving them chocolatey treats won't make them do their jobs better, because they don't care about their jobs in the first place. The ones who do care are already busting their rear ends.

    And it's such a cheesy little reward, too. I'm all for giving special recognition to those who go above and beyond, but being entered in a drawing for coffee and cookies? Really? How does that recognize those people who've really done an outstanding job?
    What I've noticed is that the "too Poshest to Wash" tend to be specifically singled-out with a "special thanks" in thank-you letters from patients and families. Why? Because they often spend most of their time chit-chatting with the patient and/or their families, while everyone else does their work. Management leaves these folks alone because they're good for PR. What's even more galling is that management will recognize and reward "excellence" for these individuals.

    A management that creates a work environment that enables me to do my job would make me extremely happy. Keep the biscuits and condescention.
  7. by   suzanne7575
    Nursing in the UK really is a joke, hopefully now you may understand why so many of us are jumping through all these hoops to get to the USA.

    Here is my little story of life as a nurse in the UK and why I am now trying to move to the states.

    I qualified in 1997 with a BSN and found a job on a medical ward no problems, there were jobs going left right and centre we had our pick. After a year I moved into ICU where i stayed for 2 years. I then got an E grade job on my old medical ward but after 6 weeks i returned from my honeymoon to find my ward had been closed down and i had been transferred elsewhere. After being moved around various wards i eventually moved to renal and haemodialysis where i stated for 5 years. I loved it and had great managers who were flexible when i had my children and allowed me to do set shifts so that I could organise childcare. I worked my way up to top E grade and was just about to apply for the F grade, when my husband got promoted with work and we had to relocate to Scotland. No problem I thought I'm a nurse i will easily find a job. How wrong was I

    It took me 6 months to even get myself on the nurse bank and i've been looking for a permanenet job for the last 12 months. When i joined the bank i had to go back to the bottom D grade even though i am still working on ICU and heamodialysis. I am getting paid about $15 an hour (down from the $20 I was earning before we moved)and the cost of living is astronomical. The average family home around here is $500,000 and the cost of food and utilities is very high, not counting in the huge amount of tax we get taken off us each month. Working conditions are horrendous, wards are ridiculously understaffed, conditions are bad, and I think it is very unsafe. My shift on saturday night will go something like this.

    I will be on a 30 bedded ward, where 90% are in need of complete care, there will be 2 RN's and 2 assistants. At 10pm when I start i will have oral meds for 15 patients to sort out, then probably around 10 of my patients will need IV's, most of our IV's here need to be mixed. After that i will help the assistants with getting the patients settled, this usually means a complete bed change for most of them, then there is the obs, BM's etc. so the lights will go out around 1am. At 2am all the complete care patients will need turning and probably bed changes again, at 5 am we have to start the bed baths and it is expected we get at least 4 patients completely bed bathed and up for the day (i absolutely do not agree with this practice but as a bank nurse i really have no choice but to comply with the ward) then i will have another 10 IV meds to make up and administer before going home.

    I am looking for a permanenet job but it is not easy, the hospitla is not hiring at the moment due to being in a huge amount of debt, so jobs are scarce, and none of the wards will be in any way flexible with regards childcare and as childcare is next to impossible to get here and what there is is extortionate i cannot afford to pay for 2 full time places for my kids as it comes to more than i can earn as full time nurse. So i have to continue working as a bank, constantly fighting to get shifts that are few and far between (even though the wards are desperate) and then basically having to work in unsafe conditions.

    I don't think i really have an awful lot to smile about, and a cup of coffee and a choccy biscuit isn't going to help that.
  8. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from DusktilDawn
    What I've noticed is that the "too Poshest to Wash" tend to be specifically singled-out with a "special thanks" in thank-you letters from patients and families. Why? Because they often spend most of their time chit-chatting with the patient and/or their families, while everyone else does their work. Management leaves these folks alone because they're good for PR. What's even more galling is that management will recognize and reward "excellence" for these individuals.

    A management that creates a work environment that enables me to do my job would make me extremely happy. Keep the biscuits and condescention.
    OMG, you could have written that about my unit! So often I see the handwritten 'thank you' cards posted and the same names appear, but NOT the ones who really bust butt making sure all the vitals are done in time (and correctly) and who make sure assessments and timely meds and such are a priority. It's the ones who "chat up" the patients and the families, so they're sure to get their names remembered! So what if the actual job of nursing falls by the wayside, I guess.
  9. by   RGN1
    Quote from aquaphoneRN
    Does anyone have the email address of the Sunday Times where this article was published?

    I think we should all email them a complaint about Sarah-Kate Templeton's revulting article.
    Just for your info, although this was a newspaper article it did appear in the nursing press first & was a straight report about one NHS trust (can't remember which - don't care either) who decided that this was a good way of rewarding staff who had "done something special" that day.

    My response - just waiting for the end of retrogression & I'm on my way over to the USA. They can keep their tea & biscuits!
  10. by   JeanettePNP
    The new motivational scheme originated in a Seattle fish market,
    This says it all.
  11. by   Angie O'Plasty
    Quote from solidaritynurse
    This is so offensive! I am not a puppy and do not need a treat for being a good girl! Just a little respect, please!

    If I was one of these UK nurses, you know where I would tell them to put their biscuits!!!!
    The image of a puppy getting a treat for being a "good girl" came to mind for me too! It is rather patronizing... I can't say I blame you for wanting to tell them to take their biscuits and make them suppositories...
  12. by   Phen
    It's amazing how sooooo much is expected of us yet we are treated with such little respect. I personally feel such suggestions insults our intelligence. An overworked, undervalued, unappreciated worker in any field may refuse to smile even if the very air she breathes is laughing gas.

    We need to start paying attention to the underlying causes of problems in the healthcare system & attack it rather than giving it some shoddy palliative treatment that won't even work in this case.
  13. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from nrskarenrn
    'nice' nurses to get free chocolate biscuits
    the sunday times - uk

    ... two years ago a resolution at the annual congress of the royal college of nursing proposed that nurses were now "too clever to care" and suggested that the ...

    okay, let me get this straight...

    the powers that be look at their brilliant customer service surveys
    ( )
    and determine that the patients are unhappy because they don't feel the nurses are spending adequate time with them.

    hmmmm....

    so their equally brilliant idea is to reward the nurses who smile more and 'chat' with their pts/families more often with a thank you note and a drawing for a cookie?



    okay #1...how generous:hatparty: ...i mean really...i have the chance to possibly win a cookie? there's an incentive for you

    #2 if these people were so brilliant, maybe they would realize that the nurses time is being taken up with 'administrative and technical' tasks (i.e. paperwork and charting) that has been placed on their shoulders by the administration and facility (i.e. the powers that be)

    wow, am i a rocket scientist or what?

    funny how corporate policy never takes the blame for anything, but the nurse is always to blame

    just brilliant!

    eta: 'too posh to wash'? if that was the general complaint, shame on the article for not making a bigger deal about it. if patients are not being bathed and cleaned up after incontinent episodes, etc. as implied by their catchy little tag line...why was there not more information about that in the article? here in the u.s., 20/20 or dateline would have been all over such a scandal. and if in fact the problem lies with the nurses being 'too posh to wash' then why isn't the cookie being given for consistent pt hygeine instead of 'chatting' up the pt and relatives...hmmmm
    :smiletea2:
    i hardly think that smiling more and cookies will change a 'too posh to wash' mentality.



    do they really think we are this stupid, or that the public is stupid enough to believe this bullmullarky
    Last edit by nurse4theplanet on Jan 20, '07

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