Two Millon People a Year Aquire Hospital Infections States CDC

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    hospital infections: as more patients are stricken, a push is on to improve safety, but are those efforts working?

    hospitals nationwide are facing a growing health concern: patients are at increased risk of acquiring life-threatening infections while in their care.

    nearly 2 million people a year acquire an infection while in a hospital, according to the federal centers for disease control and prevention. that's more than 5 percent of all hospital patients and for every day a person spends in a hospital, the risk of infection
    is about a third higher than 25 years ago, according to the cdc and other experts.

    full story:
    http://www.courier-journal.com/featu...ospital_1.html





    see other articles:

    [color=#a50400] governments want to put more teeth into reporting of infections
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Jul 2, '04
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  3. 6 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    My niece who is 20 yr old just had a premature baby at 27 weeks (1 week ago) and they did a c-section because the baby was breech. She was released from the hospital and had to go back within two days because she was bleeding from the would and the smell was horrible.

    They had to open her back up and now must heal from the inside out.

    She is having a hard time because the hospital released her today and she has to come in 3 times a day to have the wound cleaned and changed.

    She is so upset because she can't stay, worries about the wound getting infected again. She wants to be near her baby, but can't.

    They wanted her to find someone to clean and change her wound at home. What the heck kind of treatment is that? She got the infection there, they should be taking care of it.

    I just can't believe all of this and the social worker said it was because of insurance that she can't stay there to heal.

    What has become of the healthcare system?
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    this article enrages me because the majority of nosocomial infections are preventable. and there's just so little accountability from the hospitals. it truly sickens me.

    if need be, mandatory inservices need to be done as often as needed, until all workers (yes, including the md's) are brainwashed with 'wash your hands wash your hands..."

    as for the part about housekeeping, well that's going to be an ongoing battle as long as nurses are expected to do a notable part of housecleaning.

    there are too many solutions to this epidemic with too little cooperation. unconscionable. :stone

    leslie
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    Quote from studentdeb
    My niece who is 20 yr old just had a premature baby at 27 weeks (1 week ago) and they did a c-section because the baby was breech. She was released from the hospital and had to go back within two days because she was bleeding from the would and the smell was horrible.

    They had to open her back up and now must heal from the inside out.

    She is having a hard time because the hospital released her today and she has to come in 3 times a day to have the wound cleaned and changed.

    She is so upset because she can't stay, worries about the wound getting infected again. She wants to be near her baby, but can't.

    They wanted her to find someone to clean and change her wound at home. What the heck kind of treatment is that? She got the infection there, they should be taking care of it.

    I just can't believe all of this and the social worker said it was because of insurance that she can't stay there to heal.

    What has become of the healthcare system?
    The destruction of the healthcare system:
    Greedy insurance companies
    Managed Care
    Greedy attorneys
    Frivolous lawsuits
    Patients with dollar signs in their eyes from the minute they enter the facility
    Greater demand of indigent and/or elderly persons on the healthcare system
    Hospitals caring more about business than health care
    Politicians that want to stick their noses into health care (in between legislating gay marriage and spending all their lobby dollars...but that is another thread)

    there's more...but those are the biggies

    What the social worker said sounds right...insurance companies can be really snotty about what they will pay for and what they won't. They might pay for a home health nurse to come out and change the dressings, at least for a little while, most likely not until the wound is completely healed. It is pretty common for family members to have to learn to take over wound care in situations like this - it is really crappy, but there is little we healthcare workers can do about it. Managed care deserves most of the blame for the limitation on hospital stays.

    Tell your niece to take care of herself and try not to worry too much...it will hinder her body's ability to heal. The baby is being well taken care of. He/she is not missing mom...just trying to grow and get strong, so tell her to try not to feel guilty about not being there. Baby will need mom to be healthy and strong when he/she is ready to go home, so taking care of herself and getting well is the most important thing she can do for her baby at this point.

    Wishing all of you well.
  7. 0
    Quote from earle58
    this article enrages me because the majority of nosocomial infections are preventable. and there's just so little accountability from the hospitals. it truly sickens me.

    if need be, mandatory inservices need to be done as often as needed, until all workers (yes, including the md's) are brainwashed with 'wash your hands wash your hands..."

    as for the part about housekeeping, well that's going to be an ongoing battle as long as nurses are expected to do a notable part of housecleaning.

    there are too many solutions to this epidemic with too little cooperation. unconscionable. :stone

    leslie
    I think we would do ourselves well to brainwash the visitors first. I cannot tell you how many times I have had to get onto a family member for coming out of a patient's room still wearing the isolation gown and gloves to ask a staff member about something (this was in adult ICU, the nurses were easier to find than the call lights). They would sometimes bring something from inside the room out, touch the counters and the station, lean up against things - with isolation garb on!! I would explain why this was not to be done and send them back in the room. It's not like there aren't signs on the doors explaining all this in detail, but I never assume that people can or will read them.

    Some of them would get indignant, some would play dumb, some would demand to see the supervisor, some actually just complied. One supervisor actually had the nerve to threaten to write me up for "poor customer service". I told her to go right ahead. Meanwhile, I would be on the phone with infection control detailing how she was allowing a resistant organism to be spread through the ICU just because it was being done by "customers". She just looked at me, so I reminded her that these people were touching common areas after coming out of a contaminated room, (and who knows what they touched while in there - yet the gown and gloves make it obvious that they didn't was their hands). These same places are where we put charts and other various paperwork, and just about every staff member who enters our area would touch a surface that this "contaminated" visitor touched and the organism would be spread all over the hospital. These microorganisms cannot be seen, so if I had not caught them, no one would know that the surfaces needed to be disinfected.

    Well she was dumbfounded - like it never occurred to her that visitors could spread germs too. OTOH, I think she was just dumb... There are probably others out there like her, though.
  8. 0
    ok i agree that visitors are also a part of the problem, but they are not the major etiologies of contamination....

    much of it could be prevented through consistent and all inclusive handwashing; and top notch housekeeping.
  9. 0
    Quote from earle58
    this article enrages me because the majority of nosocomial infections are preventable. and there's just so little accountability from the hospitals. it truly sickens me.

    as for the part about housekeeping, well that's going to be an ongoing battle as long as nurses are expected to do a notable part of housecleaning.

    there are too many solutions to this epidemic with too little cooperation. unconscionable. :stone

    leslie
    I completely agree and am tired of the old 'wash ya hands' slogans...it is so much MORE than this in today's understaffed facilities. I could spend my whole shift perusing and cleaning/disinfecting obviously dirty surfaces...sticky with Lord knows what, etc and I seem to continuously clean blood or body fluid spots from bedrails and equipment. Shoddy housekeeping seems the rule today.

    The nurses' patient care comes first and I am swamped with that...so if housekeeping is not available or is unwilling, complaints to the supervisor may yield "If it needs doing nurses need to do it." <sigh>

    So...it all goes back to the same old root problem with our profession and the 'shortage'. Inadequate staffing and unresponsive administrators. Now...when will somebody listen?


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