Turning single parents into nurses - page 9

(New York-WABC, December 12, 2006) -- There is a unique free program aimed at filling the acute shortage of nurses and, perhaps more importantly, getting single parents educated and back into the... Read More

  1. by   smores
    i agree... like they say... nursing is a vocation, it comes with heart...
    nursing is not a job... when it becomes a job... then happiness is difficult
  2. by   rph3664
    I doubt that Ahmed Sillah is a mother, single or otherwise.

    I have no problem with people, whether parents or not, taking advantage of available programs if it's a career path they're genuinely interested in and not just a means to continue screwing over the system.
  3. by   HM2VikingRN
    Quote from rph3664
    i doubt that ahmed sillah is a mother, single or otherwise.

    i have no problem with people, whether parents or not, taking advantage of available programs if it's a career path they're genuinely interested in and not just a means to continue screwing over the system.
    the dean of the nursing program has an interesting observation:

    giving single parents a chance at nursing is close to the heart of the school's dean, dr. judy matthews.
    "this has been a hope of mine for years," dr. matthews said. "i was a single parent for many years, with three children, and if people didn't help me at that time, i wouldn't be here."
    http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?se...ols&id=4851764



    read in the land of magic soldiers. it is the story of a genocide in sierra leone.

    i have no doubt that this refugee in the story is a mother who saw horrendous things in her journey to escape a war. (mass beheadings, mass amputations etc.) it is a story that will make you cry.
  4. by   november17
    Quote from HM2Viking
    Read In the land of Magic Soldiers. It is the story of a genocide in Sierra Leone.

    I have no doubt that this refugee in the story is a mother who saw horrendous things in her journey to escape a war. (Mass beheadings, Mass amputations etc.) It is a story that will make you cry.
    What the hell does that have to do with single parent nurses
  5. by   EmmaG
    Quote from november551
    What the hell does that have to do with single parent nurses
    One of the parents described in the article is a refugee from Sierra Leone.
    Last edit by EmmaG on Dec 10, '07
  6. by   rph3664
    Quote from hm2viking
    the dean of the nursing program has an interesting observation:

    giving single parents a chance at nursing is close to the heart of the school's dean, dr. judy matthews.
    "this has been a hope of mine for years," dr. matthews said. "i was a single parent for many years, with three children, and if people didn't help me at that time, i wouldn't be here."
    http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?se...ols&id=4851764



    read in the land of magic soldiers. it is the story of a genocide in sierra leone.

    i have no doubt that this refugee in the story is a mother who saw horrendous things in her journey to escape a war. (mass beheadings, mass amputations etc.) it is a story that will make you cry.
    what i meant was, ahmed sillah is probably not a mom because ahmed is a man's name. and a single father who needs a helping hand is just as deserving as a single mother, imho.
  7. by   Weeping Willow
    Quote from steelcityrn
    Studies have shown that children need their mom at home when young. Daycare workers are no replacement. Nothing wrong with a good education, but there should be consideration to these children first. I think instead of age 5, it should be at least 8.
    I have always found it interesting that it seems to be fine for single mothers on welfare to stay home with their children but I, married, have had to work. How many times was the last sound in my ears, the last pull on my heart the sound of my children screaming to be able to stay with me when I had to drop them off at the sitter on my way to go save lives? :angryfire:angryfire:angryfire I hope they appreciate the essentially free ride they are getting, at taxpayer expense. I hope they make successes of themselves. I'm sorry for their difficulties but other people have plenty of troubles, too. Do you think they do appreciate the golden opportunity they have? I guess some do, some don't.
  8. by   EmmaG
    The article doesn't state where the funds for this program originate....

    Do you think they do appreciate the golden opportunity they have? I guess some do, some don't.
    Judging from the comments from the 5 students in the article, they appear to be appreciative.
  9. by   HM2VikingRN
    I haven't met the students but my read of their attitudes was true appreciation.

    I think that sometimes when frustration is voiced about the help offered others who are in need that it is very easy to forget that if we as individuals did not receive that particular form of help it was because we were already richly blessed by our life circumstances.

    Blessings (that are occasionally forgotten):

    Good health
    Good teeth
    Appropriate vision care
    Supportive and involved parents who encouraged life long learning
    Good schools
    Parents who were already middle class
    The ability to read and write well
    Supportive communities
    Access to enriched learning opportunities
    parents who believed in the value of education
    Safe water to drink
    adequate nutrition
    safe neighborhoods
    Not growing up in poverty....

    Each of these strengths/blessings when present in the life of young children decreases the likelihood of the need for assistance or of making poor choices that get in the way of achievement.

    I just think its important to think about your own blessings.....
  10. by   angel337
    i am all for people improving their quality of life, but this whole thing about going into nursing to do it leaves a bad taste in my mouth. nursing is not a technical job. it is a CAREER. i know some people don't agree with that but its true. i worked very hard for my degree. no one gave me special considerations. i was ambitious and motivated. i have personally known people that had their whole education provided for them by the government and still managed to mess it up. housing, food stamps, child care and still some how, some way could not pass one class. i am not making generalizations just going off of personal experience. i don't feel single parents are any different than those that are married. there are some married people that are doing worse financially than anyone can ever imagine, but because they are "married" they get limited resources. i just get the feeling that as usual nursing is not taken seriously enough. people going into this field need to know that they could potentially kill someone if they don't cross all t's and dot all I's. i can't stand the casual "i'll be a nurse" attitude that some people exhibit when they think they can just make a quick easy buck. where are all the "be a doctor" or "be a lawyer" prgrams for single parents??? you'll never see it.
  11. by   HM2VikingRN
    As I said earlier consider your own blessings....

    This program was motivated by the Dean of the school of nursing because someone helped her as a struggling young mother....

    Education is the very best ticket to help people break the cycle of poverty for themselves and their children....
  12. by   Weeping Willow
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    The article doesn't state where the funds for this program originate....

    Judging from the comments from the 5 students in the article, they appear to be appreciative.
    Ah, I did not read it. I will do that now, thanks.

    The funds are either taxes or private donations. These students are not paying much if anything themselves.
  13. by   RNDreamer
    You don't have to be a single parent to "mess up" in college...what about kids who go to college off their parent's dime or get a ton of financial aid, and flunk out because they were partying, not motivated enough, etc...my first time it college, it was competely paid for and I have nothing to show for it. I didn't flunk, just have nothing to show for it...I was single with no kids, rent, etc....it's so easy to take a group of people and automatically think the worst of them... I wish I were perfect, but I'm not.... I am definitely grateful to have a second chance at pursuing a nursing degree. Am I more deserving of this second chance because I am not a single mother?


    Quote from angel337
    i have personally known people that had their whole education provided for them by the government and still managed to mess it up. housing, food stamps, child care and still some how, some way could not pass one class. i am not making generalizations just going off of personal experience. .

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