Title fight: Some Calif. physical therapists will soon be 'doctor' - page 2

title fight: some calif. physical therapists will soon be 'doctor' on jan. 1, physical therapists with doctoral degrees across the state will be getting acquainted with the title. that's when a... Read More

  1. by   scholar
    Quote from damarystx
    an NP can go into private practice, diagnose, order/interpret tests and prescribe treatment including meds, and round on their patients independent of a doctor. NP's have several different options of study such as family medicine, neonatal, oncology, womens health, etc. and in rural areas where their may not be a "Dr." an NP may be the ONLY healthcare provider available to the community. Yes there are limitations but they are still practicing medicine just from a different perspective. And now there are newer clinical doctorate degree programs for the DrNP that give's more clinical hours vs. the research of a phd, given the newness of the degree's I don't think that the fight is over, or even to the point of beating a dead horse, more like it is just beginning. Knowing the notoriety before going into the field doesn't mean that you shouldn't fight for change.
    "Yes there are limitations but they are still practicing medicine just from a different perspective" And I would assume certain limitations exist b/c nps are not equal to md/dos. I have nothing against NPs or PAs, I was just saying that to call someone a doctor in a hospital setting whose not a MD/DO is misleading. If you must educate the general public of your graduate level education this technique is not the best way. If you are a nurse Ph.D and I called you doctor in the hospital What would most people assume? Most people would think you were a doctor.

    Ph.d nurses should gain respect for the nursing profession by not professing that they are a doctor, but by confessing that they are doctorally prepared nurses. I didn't say you shouldn't fight for a change. The best thing to do would be to come up with a new name for a phd nurse. If you're a phd nurse it may be insulting to be referred to as a nurse b/c the nurse down the hall has a diploma. Either you can seperate yourselves by changing your occupational name or just give the whole profession a better name in the public's eye. One should remain to be called a nurse in the clinical settting to improve the public's opinion of us.
  2. by   llg
    Quote from scholar
    Ph.d nurses should gain respect for the nursing profession by not professing that they are a doctor, but by confessing that they are doctorally prepared nurses. I didn't say you shouldn't fight for a change. The best thing to do would be to come up with a new name for a phd nurse. If you're a phd nurse it may be insulting to be referred to as a nurse b/c the nurse down the hall has a diploma. Either you can seperate yourselves by changing your occupational name or just give the whole profession a better name in the public's eye. One should remain to be called a nurse in the clinical settting to improve the public's opinion of us.
    I am not at all insulted by being referred to as a nurse ... and I always make it clear to patients (and everyone else) that I am a nurse. 99% of the time, I am happy to be referred to by my first name -- as are most of my physician colleagues.

    However, I will not allow anyone to deny me the right to use the title I have earned in situations in which it is appropriate. We ALL have obligations to our patients to clearly explain our role in their care. That goes not only for non-physician "doctors," but also for physicians. The residents, fellows, etc. should not just be introduced as "doctor," they should be sure the patient understands that they are just the junior physician-in-training. If we all are clear about our roles and introduce ourselves appropriately to the patients, there will be no confusion.
  3. by   JPine
    The funny thing is that decades ago it was the person with the PhD who was able to go by the title "Doctor", because they attained their "Doctorate" degree. It was only MUCH later that Physicians used the title "Doctor" -and almost took it away from PhD's- so they could make themselves more acceptable to the public because it was the PhD holder who was much more esteemed than the lowly physician. -it's funny how that worked out-.
  4. by   Gromit
    One of the nurses (well, at the time she was like me, a 'nurse-to-be') I graduated with, her last name was 'doctor' (spelled out). So she would be (firstname) doctor, RN. hehehe. Just figured I'd stick that in here.
    Oftentimes folks with doctorates do not address themselves as 'doctor' in a public setting, to avoid the impression (that others will have) that they are a physician.
    Personally, if you earned the doctorate, you should have the right to call yourself as such. They don't (as a rule) give away the titles, you had to work very hard to get it. If the public (or patients) are confused by it, then its time they open up their eyes and get some awareness.
  5. by   PsychNurseWannaBe
    Quote from JPine
    The funny thing is that decades ago it was the person with the PhD who was able to go by the title "Doctor", because they attained their "Doctorate" degree. It was only MUCH later that Physicians used the title "Doctor" -and almost took it away from PhD's- so they could make themselves more acceptable to the public because it was the PhD holder who was much more esteemed than the lowly physician. -it's funny how that worked out-.
    I was going to mention this... but you beat me to it. Doctor was for academics and a physcian was a medical doctor. I remember seeing a sign once (ex, Dr. Joe Smith, M.D.) and thought it was redundant but then I understood why it was that way. So why can't we have Dr. Jack Jones, DScN or N.D. for nursing doctor

    I don't agree that we shouldn't educate the public. How many people do you know get confused between doctors that are psychologist and psychiatrists... and what do we do? We explain it to them.

    Why does the medical/education model "reap" the rewards of this title but shame to a nurse who wants to use theirs? It seems that if a nurse wants to use that title... they are "boasting" and we all know that nurses are to be meek and humble. What kind of thinking is this? WOW... apparently I am having an issue with this ... LOL

    I am just saying that we have a duty to the public and to our profession. Forsaking one for the other is not going to work because it breaks our code of ethics. It is a no-brainer that we are there for patients... but also remember we are there to advance our profession and our practice.

    OK... I'm done.

    ~Psych
  6. by   Gromit
    Hehehehe. Meek and humble are just NOT the words most of my colleagues would use to describe me but in all seriousness I was not suggesting that we not educate the public (far from it) but I was taking issue with the idea that since the 'public' would (or might) be confused, we shouldn't do it. I'm more than sick and tired of the political-correctness attitude. Don't do something because others might not understand or might be offended (or make your own excuse). Hell with that. So long as its at least ethical (and legal), its time to grow up a bit, and maybe even (yes) grow a uh, pair. The Public are not babies, and we might find that we would have far more support than we thought we had or could even expect.
    If I had earned my doctorate (in nursing or otherwise) you can bet your bottom dollar I'd be proud enough to use the title. I can't speak for others, but where I grew up, you earned what you achieved -it wasn't given. You were also raised to be proud of what you had accomplished- not ashamed of it.
  7. by   Memerson2000
    In England, surgeons are called "Mister". Patients still manage to figure out who's who, especially if we're all introducing ourselves and telling them what our role in their recovery will be.

    I worked with a clinical assistant who wore a white lab coat and, after he'd cleaned up a patient's bowel movement, I found the patient distressed. "I'm mortified," the patient said. "My cardiologist was just in here, wiping my ass." I reassured him that under no circumstance would his cardiologist EVER wipe his ass.

    If I had a PhD, I'd make my own mother called me doctor. And my kids. My only problem with it is when a PhD in library science introduces himself as "Dr. Smith" and requests protected patient information.

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