Thousands of RNs Planning 2-Day Strike - page 4

Thousands of RNs Planning 2-Day Strike Registered nurses at 13 Sutter Health chains and some other local hospitals have been negotiating for a new contract for several months. Talks have broken... Read More

  1. by   SmilingBluEyes
    BillEDRN: I was more thinking hypothetically for myself, say, if I worked in an area where I could not get a job---- (and, yes, places do exist, where an overage of nurses are and jobs are scarce-)--- or I were in between jobs, whereby I needed to put food on my table, and such an opportunity came up, as did for my friend. Each person has to do what he/she feels is best for his/her own situation, truly. I have not walked in everyone's shoes in order to paint such people with a broad brush of out-and-out insulting terms. Do I agree with what they do? I already said I do not. I told my friend this, as well. But as I also already said, I have to agree to disagree with her. I can only try to see other sides of the issue. I just can't say "never" because I know I would do what it took to support my family.

    What you consider "unethical" is not so to the next person, no matter how disagreeable it may be to you. Calling people ugly names brings no articulate point to your arguments, believe me.

    Further, if you will kindly read all my posts, you will see I actually do not myself intend to, nor support the notion of, busting strikes. I am speaking on general terms only. Let's discontinue this back-and-forth argument here,and ourselves, agree to disagree, in order not to hijack this thread further.

    Finally, in all earnest, I wish the striking nurses the best in gaining what they believe are fair treatment and compensation.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Oct 9, '07
  2. by   leslie :-D
    it would never be my intent to cross a picket line.
    but if i'm a single parent who has to feed my kids and pay for the roof over their heads, i'll do what i have to do as a last resort.
    if hooking on the street corner, gets me enough money, that's what i will do.
    you do what you have to do, in critical situations.
    survival and parental responsibiity will always supercede ethics.

    leslie
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    That was what I was myself trying to say, Leslie. I still maintain, name-calling won't sway anyone to my point or help them see what I am trying to say.
  4. by   pickledpepperRN
    Nurses Step Up Plans for California’s Biggest RN Strike This Decade

    …Safe care for patients, health security for RNs. Among the key issues in Sutter are:
    Patient care

    RN-to-patient ratios. CNA wants all the Sutter hospitals to include the state mandated RN staffing ratios, in their contracts to add the legal clout of their contract to enforce safe staffing at all times. Different Sutter hospitals have different language, and California Pacific is refusing to guarantee adherence to the ratios at all.

    Break relief. The RNs want Sutter to guarantee it will maintain safe staffing, including full adherence to the ratios, when RNs are on meal or rest breaks.

    Rapid response. CNA proposed that each Sutter facility have a rapid response team support, including a critical care RN and respiratory therapist to intervene and stabilize patients which healthcare experts say has been valuable in saving lives of patients in emergencies. Further, CNA is calling for an admittance RN in emergency departments to speed up patient assessments and placements, which also promotes patient safety and recovery.

    Safe patient handling. The RNs want all Sutter facilities to have a lift team on hand at all times to assist with handling of patients, which is important to prevent accidents and falls, and reduce caregiver back and other injuries. Many CNA contracts provide for lift teams.

    No cuts in patient services. CNA is strongly protesting Sutter plans to close San Leandro and Santa Rosa, and slash acute care services at St. Luke’s and CPMC in San Francisco….

    http://www.calnurses.org/media-cente...275238&print=t
  5. by   bigreddog1934
    i am sorry, but imposing these hypothetical situations, these examples of near-starvation, onto the current situation does little else but to cloud an otherwise very clear topic. none of these nurses traveling to break the strike are starving to death and none are prostituting themselves for money.

    but by making this discussion purely about individual choices, you are missing the bigger and far more important issues that create the inevitable need for strikes in the first place. if these strike-breaking nurses are so desperate for a wage, why is that so? if there is such a problem with staffing that good nurses are willing to walk out of the hospital what is driving that? most importantly, what is our collective responsibility during these times as nurses?

    during these times all nurses are required to make decisions about how to respond. the nice ideas about freedom of expression and personal choice are not vague concepts limited to the text on these discussion boards. they are real issues with real consequences that affect first and foremost the striking nurses and their patients, and beyond that, health care as a whole.

    these pages should offer help and solidarity to those fighting for a better tomorrow instead of organizing to disrupt their efforts, either as an intellectual exercise or as a tool of hospital management.

    the luxury to be lenient to either of these concepts is getting thinner by the day.
    Last edit by bigreddog1934 on Oct 9, '07
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Thank you for the updates, Spacenurse.
  7. by   CityKat
    Quote from lostdruid
    I'd cross a picket line in a New York minute.

    Sorry for the Cali nurses who are working in unsafe environments, but would they rather the patients had NO nurses at all? Or would they rather punish their hospital and force them into compliance by having to pay extra money to the travelers?
    It seems you do NOT UNDERSTAND the meaning of a strike at all. You're still in school and so, you should learn by the time you get OUT of nursing school the purpose of nurses striking. You think it's better for us to continue to work in these conditions? Do you really think patient safety isn't our goal? Or, perhaps we should just shut up, continue working like good little nurses do without having a voice of purpose for our patients, patient care and safety. Yes I know, this forces our hospital to hire "scabs" that don't care if they undermine the efforts of us and our strategies for better patient care. You remember this when you come to work as a travel RN to one of our hospitals here in California. Remember why your pay is what it is and why your working conditions are better than where you currently live. CA has set the standard on nurse to patient ratios and it wasn't done by sitting on our rear ends. Think about all of this before you are so quick to cross that picket line. Also, think about how you will be treated if you ever show up for work one day in that same hospital.
  8. by   lionrn
    Try this one on for size:

    Think of the worst nurse you know who could in the most unlikely situation end up working on the unit you work.
    Now imagine that nurse is on your unit on the worst possible day - maybe that's why the worst nurse is obliged to work on your unit today.
    Now imagine that no one is available to cross check, supervise, support, berate, or remove that nurse, because that's how things are going today.

    Are that nurse's patients safe?

    If care conditions were better overall, would there be a better nurse available to fill that role, or perhaps the day wouldn't be so bad to require such a mismatch?

    Just as a contrast, I don't hear much about the lawyer shortage, nor do I hear from lawyers how their client's interests are being compromised due to bad lawyer conditions.

    And remind me: when was the last lawyers' strike due to bad lawyer conditions, or compromised client safety due to those conditions?

    If I'm wrong, please educate me!
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    48-hour nurses' strike at 15 hospitals

    Nearly 5,000 registered nurses are expected to begin a 48-hour strike at 15 Northern California hospitals beginning at 7 a.m. today in a labor dispute they say is about improving patient care standards and the hospitals say is about aggressive union organizing efforts

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...N2F7.DTL&tsp=1
  10. by   leslymill
  11. by   deehaverrn
    i truly sympathize with the striking nurses. california is at the forefront of nurses striving to improve the healthcare of our entire nation. i just wish the "trickle down" effect would spread east more quickly! In my northeastern state we have NO staff-patient ratios mandated, rather I care for anywhere between 6 to 10 patients (high risk antepartum or postpartum). For this I might have the assistance of one nurse's aide who is also helping AT LEAST one other staff member. We rarely have breaks or meals during our shifts, and stay about 30 minutes late each shift to finish charting. Many of us have injured our backs by turning or lifting pts on our own because we have no lifting assistance. Our salary tops out at $27/hr. We do get paid health benefits but they end when we retire. (how we'll continue this until age 65-70 is beyond me). My hospital is not union, only one area hospital is..and they have really poor services..i know i did work there for one year. The union there had a strike during which time most nurses left completely. I was shocked at the comments by the general public AND my fellow nurses concerning the nurses there. They focused on the salary and benefits that the nurses were fighting to keep. I particularly remember that they were critical of a nurse having 6 weeks vacation after 20 years employment...I think we all deserve that, in fact, I think we should have early retirement plans much like police officers, firefighters, and teachers. This job is too physically challenging to do when you get older...and don't say switch to an office job...around here that means a cut of at least half the pay...so you would be compromising your retirement plans.
    The main thing is that Nurses need to stick together for good pay and benefits. They need to fight for staffing and environments sufficient for good patient care. I think one huge disadvantage that Nursing has, as a profession, is that somehow our Nursing leaders do not support their troops (primary caregivers). The managers and Nurse executives somehow close their eyes and start synching with the "company" line.
    Oh and as for the comments on that article...the reason that healthcare costs are rising has NOTHING to do with nurses...we are the ones that make healthcare more affordable, often to our own detriment. We really need to stop with the idea of nurses being martyrs all ready. We DESERVE to be paid well. We DESERVE to have good working conditions-with breaks, manageable assignments, lifting assistance, meals, and punctual hours. We DESERVE to have benefits at a PROFESSIONAL level and not just the same ones given to the guy who cleans the food trucks. If the public wonders about the rise in Healthcare costs they need to look at the salary and benefits of hospital and insurance executives. And at the profit margin of the insurance companies who are really running the show.
    Anyway...long story..short. Hope that the strikers get what they want..
    AS for the SCABS...I know that most of you are probably just in it for the $, BUT the only RN I ever knew that was a strike buster..used the chaos and disorganization of being at different hospitals for brief times to support her drug habit by diverting narcotics. Not much of a recommendation, she surely wasn't in it for the patients sake.
  12. by   leslymill
    I think California's ACLN Action Plan will realize there Initiative at the rate NNOC/CNA is demanding improved safety and conditions at the bedside. If it works probably all states will follow suit
    If you can improve the bedside care and condition you will draw BSNs and that is their goal.
    Just got this email today. Now I know what that post was about "2010 only BSN"
    http://www.nursingcenter.com/library...?pageid=746637
  13. by   DaFreak71
    Quote from StudentNurseBean
    It seems you do NOT UNDERSTAND the meaning of a strike at all. You're still in school and so, you should learn by the time you get OUT of nursing school the purpose of nurses striking. You think it's better for us to continue to work in these conditions? Do you really think patient safety isn't our goal? Or, perhaps we should just shut up, continue working like good little nurses do without having a voice of purpose for our patients, patient care and safety. Yes I know, this forces our hospital to hire "scabs" that don't care if they undermine the efforts of us and our strategies for better patient care. You remember this when you come to work as a travel RN to one of our hospitals here in California. Remember why your pay is what it is and why your working conditions are better than where you currently live. CA has set the standard on nurse to patient ratios and it wasn't done by sitting on our rear ends. Think about all of this before you are so quick to cross that picket line. Also, think about how you will be treated if you ever show up for work one day in that same hospital.
    I sure am looking forward to the phat checks! Sure, I am but a lowly nursing student at the moment, but I'm married to a "real" RN who doesn't have an issue with it either. As far as thinking about how I'll be treated if I work at that same hospital...never gonna happen. Did the Cali thing and it's not my cup-o-tea. So I've got no reason whatsoever to respond to veiled threats of retribution.

close