Thousands of RNs Planning 2-Day Strike - page 3

Thousands of RNs Planning 2-Day Strike Registered nurses at 13 Sutter Health chains and some other local hospitals have been negotiating for a new contract for several months. Talks have broken... Read More

  1. by   TrudyRN
    [quote=bigreddog1934;2434702]if it were up to me, allnurse whould remove immediately any posts that attempt to undermine the efforts of these nurses on the picket lines. [quote]

    So you believe in censorship.
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Allnurses.com is not about censorship. In order to understand complicated issues, all points of view need to be considered and heard. It's when people resort to attacking others to make their point, that allnurses.com administration and staff are forced to draw the line. Just because a point of view or belief is possibly "offensive" is not enough reason to "red-line" it from the site, alone.

    Thanks for understanding and keeping the discussion polite.
  3. by   MA Nurse
    Quote from janhetherington
    Some nurses want to fill in for the striking nurses to collect the great wages. Ok, at least stick with the real motive. Strike busting is not primarily about "taking care of the patients". Hospitals make the most money out of elective surgery patients, which can be rescheduled. We always tear each other down, and management always encourages this. Or at least just gets out of our way. That's why we never get anywhere. And it's not against our nursing ethics to take a stand for safe staffing and adequate patient care. It's what we are supposed to be doing as patient advocates.
    A newspaper article stated that US Nursing was filling in for the 2 days and that they ARE NOT strike breakers!? LOL! Yeah, right. They just don't want to admit what they stand for.
  4. by   BillEDRN
    Quote from Kimbalou
    I really don't think a 2-day strike will do anything. Those hospitals will have nurses ready to cross the picket line. They should stay out longer than 2 days.
    Actually a limited duration strike may work better than extended ones...the reason being is that on extended strikes (and remember, by law the union must provide a 10 day notice of strike to allow the facility to prepare...) the facility can hire strike busters for the duration. If nurses only strike for two days, then the facility has a harder time hiring the scum, I mean stike busters, as their contracts are usually for periods of time longer than 1-2 days. The strategy was used with some success during earlier strikes in California.
  5. by   BillEDRN
    Quote from janhetherington
    Some nurses want to fill in for the striking nurses to collect the great wages. Ok, at least stick with the real motive. Strike busting is not primarily about "taking care of the patients". Hospitals make the most money out of elective surgery patients, which can be rescheduled. We always tear each other down, and management always encourages this. Or at least just gets out of our way. That's why we never get anywhere. And it's not against our nursing ethics to take a stand for safe staffing and adequate patient care. It's what we are supposed to be doing as patient advocates.
    Having been thru an extensive strike in which the hospitals brought in strike busting nurses, I can tell you that their motives (the strike buster's) are not about patient safety. It is about the money, and ironically, the working conditions afforded them while they are busy collecting wages far in excess of what the striking nurses would have earned. While out on strike, the facility provided the strike busters with transportation to the hospital, lodging, meals while at work, had a "coffee cart" go around to the floors 24 hours a day, bought pizza for those working on a routine basis, and increased the staffing ratios to make sure that they weren't overworked. If you note the sentiment the poster made about the way they were treated by management, you will see that the facilities treat the strike busters much better than the "regular staff."
    Funny that it's OK for the facility to make sure the working conditions (staffing, meal breaks and food availability, roaming coffee cart) are improved for the "hired guns" but cannot do this type of stuff for their regular employees.
    However, more importantly, is the fact that many of these "hired guns" do not have the needed skills to handle the patients assigned to them...although facilities are not going to release the info, there are many reports, including those from the strike I participated in, of sub-standard care and basic mistakes.
    These nurses who are willing to cross picket lines are nothing more than cowardly, money grubbing low lifes who have little to no moral compass, and use the "patient safety" argument as a justification for their self-serving practices. Which, in the long run benefit only themselves, the staffing agencies, and the healthcare industry, and only hamper the real efforts by the courageous nurses who are willing to strike (and incur the financial hardships associated with it) to improve patient safety. If patient safety were really an issue, why aren't these strike busters working in their hometowns, leading efforts to improve patient safety? Is it that many are from southern, right-to-work states where the working conditions are dismal and the pay is low for RNs?
    To the striking nurses...good luck. I wish you the best. May your efforts and sacrifices lead to the improvements we all know are needed.
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I agree with a lot of the above post except the generalization about the strike-busting nurses. I don't consider them cowardly or money-grubbing low lives at all. We all have to make a living somehow. This is just not how I would choose to, given a real choice, myself. My ire rests with administation that treats them so well when they treat regular staff so poorly on a routine basis.
  7. by   BillEDRN
    Thank you. While you are certainly free to disagree with my characterization of these strike busters (which is from both personal experience and research into the various agencies that employ them) your statement that "we all need to make a living somehow" to somehow justifiy these individual's behavior is discouraging and, in my opinion, wrong. Would you extend the same level of tolerance to those that steal, threaten the safety of others, place pay over professional responsibility or hamper efforts to improve society if they weren't nurses/scabs? Some things should not be condoned and until we nurses, as a group, stand up and collectively rally against the negative impact these scabs cause on efforts to correct what our profession seems to universally recognize as detriments to our practice, (poor staffing, high injury rates, poor working conditions, etc.) the more difficult it will be to induce the healthcare industry to make substantive changes. To quote Edmund Burke "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    There is no excuse for one group of nurses to thwart the efforts of other nurses to improve working conditions and patient safety, especially if the only motivating factor is their own financial reward! That, in my humble opinon, is the definition of cowardly and money-grubbing low life.
    Last edit by BillEDRN on Oct 8, '07
  8. by   CityKat
    Quote from BillEDRN
    Thank you. While you are certainly free to disagree with my characterization of these strike busters (which is from both personal experience and research into the various agencies that employ them) your statement that "we all need to make a living somehow" to somehow justifiy these individual's behavior is discouraging and, in my opinion, wrong. Would you extend the same level of tolerance to those that steal, threaten the safety of others, place pay over professional responsibility or hamper efforts to improve society if they weren't nurses/scabs? Some things should not be condoned and until we nurses, as a group, stand up and collectively rally against the negative impact these scabs cause on efforts to correct what our profession seems to universally recognize as detriments to our practice, (poor staffing, high injury rates, poor working conditions, etc.) the more difficult it will be to induce the healthcare industry to make substantive changes. To quote Edmund Burke "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    There is no excuse for one group of nurses to thwart the efforts of other nurses to improve working conditions and patient safety, especially if the only motivating factor is their own financial reward! That, in my humble opinion, is the definition of cowardly and money-grubbing low life.
    THANK YOU for supporting the nurses employed by Sutter Health!
    I am one of those Sutter Health RN's who is located in San Francisco and I agree with everything you have said, 100%!!
  9. by   leslymill
    Quote from palkie
    ok, i have never been part of a union either, although sometimes i wished one was available.

    excuse my ignorance, but i have a question. how can the nurses "walk out" at 7 am if there is no one to relieve them? i guess this is where the strike nurses come in to the picture, but if you are not able to turn your patient over to another rn, isn't that "patient abandonment" and can't you lose your license?
    and, well?? i mean someone must care for patients, right? nobody really thinks administrators, techs, and doctors can or will do it, do they? the patients would all die within hours, or the staff would kill each other - or possibly themselves.

    perhaps having a union and a contract allow nurses to just leave (their contract is up... they go) but i know here in the south, if it snows, we go ahead and plan to stay for several days working 16 hour shifts if necessary to handle patient care. we do this because many nurses may be unable to come in to work, due to hazardous conditions, and nurses currently charged with the care of the patients must stay until relieved of duty. (and yes we do get paid for all of it - even "standby" pay while you are sleeping at the facility. there are also "bad weather plans" with pick-up points by hospital vans... but the hospital rarely activates them.)

    i was just curious as i am not really informed about unions, ets.


    good luck to you all.
    good question. i worked through hurricaine andrew. stayed up a total of 52 hours. 16 hours getting the patients stable, passing meds, some kind of food , v/s, charting their status after the storm. some of the day shift nurses showed up, but not to work. they had no homes and were not sure of the survival of their loved ones. at some point in time it is not abandonment, it is self preservation. i gave report to the supervisor and left with another nurse who was in tears thinking her family was dead. i drove her to her house. then i drove to my demolished trailer and piled what i could salvage to pick up later. i drove back to the hospital and helped them evacuate pts into buses and ambulances way into the night for the ride to miami. the nurses that stayed had to try and get a few hourse of sleep inbetween the caos on cots. in a disaster pts don't complain much. in a strike they are still paying for their healthcare and they are probably demanding as usual. after 16 hours it is probably not considered abandonment in most states, if there is a nurse supervisor and administrators there. they were aware of the strike ahead of time. they had agreed not to agree.
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I am simply looking at more than one side of the issue. I know a nurse going down there and I would characterize her as none of the nasty descriptions you assign to such people. For the record, I would not choose to do this myself, (cross anyone's picket line and undermine their efforts) unless dire circumstances (no other choice to feed family/self) led me to it. This nurse knows how I feel and we agree to disagree.

    I can't ever say "never" in any situation...so shame on me.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Oct 9, '07
  11. by   MA Nurse
    Quote from BillEDRN
    Actually a limited duration strike may work better than extended ones...the reason being is that on extended strikes (and remember, by law the union must provide a 10 day notice of strike to allow the facility to prepare...) the facility can hire strike busters for the duration. If nurses only strike for two days, then the facility has a harder time hiring the scum, I mean stike busters, as their contracts are usually for periods of time longer than 1-2 days. The strategy was used with some success during earlier strikes in California.
    If you look at the USNursing website, the nurses must be available for 5 days, even if the strike lasts just 2 days. This is because usually the hospitals will lock the striking nurses out. I've seen that before.
  12. by   pickledpepperRN
    Nurses criticize cuts as strike looms
    Planned action also targets changes to health care, retirement benefits

    Nurses at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center and other Sutter Health hospitals say that inadequate staffing means they can't take a meal break without abandoning their patients….

    …"It's not good for patients to have a nurse that feels faint because she hasn't eaten," said Jan Rodolfo, a registered nurse in the Alta Bates Summit Medical Center of Oakland, speaking to reporters as members of the California Nurses Association made picket signs Monday….

    …The two-day work stoppage would occur at 13 Sutter Health hospitals, including the Berkeley and Oakland Alta Bates facilities as well as San Leandro Hospital, Mills-Peninsula Health Services in Burlingame and San Mateo, Sutter Delta in Antioch, Sutter Solano in Vallejo, Sutter Medical Center of Santa Rosa, St. Luke's Hospital and California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco, Eden Medical Center in Castro Valley, Sutter Marin General Hospital in Greenbrae and Sutter Novato.

    The nurses say that Sutter Health hospitals are violating legally mandated nurse-to-patient ratios by not providing for coverage when nurses take breaks.
    Most nurses just don't take breaks, according to Sharon Tobin, an intensive care unit nurse at Mills-Peninsula….
    http://www.insidebayarea.com/ci_7125589?source=rss
  13. by   BillEDRN
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I am simply looking at more than one side of the issue. I know a nurse going down there and I would characterize her as none of the nasty descriptions you assign to such people. For the record, I would not choose to do this myself, (cross anyone's picket line and undermine their efforts) unless dire circumstances (no other choice to feed family/self) led me to it. This nurse knows how I feel and we agree to disagree.

    I can't ever say "never" in any situation...so shame on me.
    What dire circumstances can you be alluding to? Since when has a competent nurse with experience have no other choice except to choose to work as a scab? One of the contentions many have about these agencies and the scabs that work there is that one of the reasons they aren't working "regular" jobs (either as a traveling nurse or in their hometowns) is because of prior employment problems or incompetence.
    While I applaude your decision to not cross a picket line, it does not detract from the fact that those that do essestially undermind the efforts of other (IMHO more ethical) nurses who feel that they have not other recourse than striking. The fact that those who work as scabs undermine these efforts soley for financial gain is deplorable and should not be tolerated by the nursing profession.

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