The Recession's Effect on Hospital Registered Nurse Employment Growth

  1. 1 From Nursing Economics: The Recession's Effect on Hospital Registered Nurse Employment Growth www.medscape.com/viewarticle/749072
  2. Visit  lperkrn profile page

    About lperkrn

    From 'Bay Area'; Joined Jul '09; Posts: 76; Likes: 65.

    28 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  want2banrn profile page
    0
    This link takes you to a page that requires a login ID and password
  4. Visit  chuckster profile page
    2
    Quote from want2banrn
    This link takes you to a page that requires a login ID and password
    Access to Medscape does require registration but it is free. I've found it to be useful resource.
    IowaKaren and Esme12 like this.
  5. Visit  libbyliberal profile page
    3
    Read the authors disclosures, one is employed by an independent healthcare research group in Boston called RAND.

    Read page seven which references eliminating older Nurses to improve morale and make room for new graduates.
    Esme12, CCRNDiva, and lindarn like this.
  6. Visit  lindarn profile page
    16
    Quote from libbyliberal
    Read the authors disclosures, one is employed by an independent healthcare research group in Boston called RAND.

    Read page seven which references eliminating older Nurses to improve morale and make room for new graduates.
    It is really too bad that they does not suggest using mandatory staffing ratios to improve patient outcomes and will produce a need for bedside nurses.

    If staffing ratios were introduced across the country, in hospitals and nursing homes, there would indeed be a nursing shortage. This "artificial glut", of nurses is not only a result of poor staffing (one nurse can care for 15 patients), but a reflection of the lack of support from our nursing leaders, who have shouted," massive nursing shortage in the near future- produce more nurses", ad nauseum. They have allowed this situation to occur and as usual, show a complete lack of support and understanding, for the nurses who they are supposed to represent.

    JMHO and my NY $0.02.
    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    somewhere in the PA
    kalevra, nursejoed, IowaKaren, and 13 others like this.
  7. Visit  lilredrn profile page
    3
    Quote from libbyliberal
    Read page seven which references eliminating older Nurses to improve morale and make room for new graduates.
    inshallamiami, brandy1017, and lindarn like this.
  8. Visit  chuckster profile page
    7
    The data for my geographic area (the 5th largest SMSA in the US) is at odds with the findings in this article. For example, RN full-time jobs (not FTE) in my 5-county area, which is not the full SMSA but should suffice to illustrate the point, from 2006 through 2009 (the latest year I have jobs data for) were:
    2006 - 44,840
    2007 - 42,420
    2008 - 42,740
    2009 - 42,820
    You can see that this represents a net decrease of just over 2,000 nursing jobs over 4 years. Over that same period, the state BON reported the following numbers of first-time NCLEX candidates passing the exam as:
    2006 - 1,935
    2007 - 1,797
    2008 - 1,986
    2009 - 2,142
    This means that from 2006 to 2009, there were nearly 8,000 new RN's entering the workforce at the same time the number of nursing jobs was decreasing by nearly 5%. Obviously, some RN's retired or otherwise left the workforce during the period but unless those numbers were very large - and during a recession they typically would not be - it would appear that RN creation is far outpacing the ability of the local job market to absorb the increase. While this may be a localized phenomenon, much of the anecdotal evidence I've seen here on AN seems to indicate that most major metropolitan areas in the US are experiencing something similar at least with respect to jobs, with either stagnant or declining growth in Registered Nursing employment.

    We see quite a different jobs picture in the article however. Looking at the table of "hospital-employed FTE registered nurses" (Table 3) over the same period we see the following:
    2006 - 1,345,711
    2007 - 1,429,989
    2008 - 1,588,226
    2009 - 1,569,496
    This indicates an increase of over 220,000 jobs nationwide in the same 2006 - 2009 timeframe. Note that these figures are for "full-time equivalent" (FTE) heads, which is defined as "the number of full-time employees plus half the number of part-time employees, where fulltime employment is defined as working 30 or more hours per week." This would seem to tend to skew the employment numbers upward - perhaps by design. Even so, how can we explain this seeming contradiction with the local data? Could it be that RN job growth has been robust in small cities and rural areas across the country while declining in more urban areas? I honestly do not know the answer but think this could be an interesting topic for someone to more fully investigate.
    Altra, gummi bear, montecarlo64, and 4 others like this.
  9. Visit  chuckster profile page
    3
    Quote from libbyliberal
    Read the authors disclosures, one is employed by an independent healthcare research group in Boston called RAND. . .
    This article does have flaws but in fairness to the authors, the RAND Corporation is a well-known and relatively highly regarded multi-faceted independent research organization. In fact, the term "think-tank" was actually first applied to RAND. They do not focus on any one subject and per their website, state that "RAND focuses on the issues that matter most such as health, education, national security, international affairs, law and business, the environment, and more."

    I don't want to be seen as an apologist for RAND but they are not an agenda-driven organization in the way that the Center for American Progress or Americans for Prosperity (both funded by very conservative groups such as the Koch Bros foundation) are.
    NRSKarenRN, coast2coast, and Altra like this.
  10. Visit  libbyliberal profile page
    3
    Donald Rumsfeld was once on the board of the RAND corporation.
    Esme12, GLB_68, and lindarn like this.
  11. Visit  Mulan profile page
    5
    [quote=libbyliberal;5933099]Read the authors disclosures, one is employed by an independent healthcare research group in Boston called RAND.

    Read page seven which references eliminating older Nurses to improve morale and make room for new graduates.[/quote

    Actually, isn't it eliminating low performers?

    "Meanwhile, as relatively high unemployment rates continue to stimulate record high RN workforce participation, hospitals should not forgo the opportunity to induce low-performers to leave the organization, not only for reasons related to improving quality of care and promoting staff morale, but to create room for new RN graduates. Similarly, while so many veteran RNs are in the hospital workforce, hospitals may consider how they could serve as mentors to those newly entering the workforce."

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/749072_6
    kalevra, wetzoo, lrobinson5, and 2 others like this.
  12. Visit  brandy1017 profile page
    5
    Low performers implies productivity ala assembly line conditions. Nursing is supposed to be about brains and knowledge coupled with compassion, but evaluating nurses as low performers reveals the truth is otherwise!
    IowaKaren, libbyliberal, KeyMaster, and 2 others like this.
  13. Visit  kcmylorn profile page
    7
    I too take issue with the reference of 'low performers' especially since that derrogatory phrase was not defined in the article. I have an issue with this on many levels. Just who or what group is this phrase flung at? Are they implying that low performers are of a certain age? What make one a 'low performer'? Where is the metric for "low performer" or is this subject to the whim of individual manager and their chosen "in group"/inner circle? Who are they comparing the standards of a 'low performer" by? Just what is the attributes of the 'high performer'?
    Next, I have to ask- Who and How many nurses, and to what staffing ratio do they think they are going to need when the TRUE effects of this 'recession' 'ecomonic downturn' or what ever minimalistic phrase those in their IVORY towers( not just nursing but manangement also) are finally realized into the "Oh My God " moment? The "Oh My God" moment when the true reality of the now existant poor health status devastation of $45.1 million unemployed people in this country( let me spell some of it out- no health insurance, there for a negligence of their personal health issues, no money for the once needed medications of BP, IDDM, COPD, etc, no money for healthy food but shopping at the dollar stores and walmart for cheap, affordable, poor nutritional value foods because theat is all they can afford) AND the aging population of us baby boomers( we are supposed to be living longer due to the pre recession advances in modern medicine so they say, but now with the recession, I don't know)) AND the complexity and acuity of thier illnesses ( this should need no explaination to practicing RN's at the beside- a patient doesn't only come in to the hospital with uncontrolled HTn, they are coming in wioth uncontrolled HTN, IDDM, renal falure to any degree and a good percent of them with substance abuse included in the cor-morbid line up). Wouldn't anyone here just like to shake that ivory tower at it's base until they all fall to the ground? I know I would!!
    They throw alot of 'looking good' for the glossy magazine stats out there but they don't seem to get the "BIG PICTURE", they are not "CONCEPTUALIZING the BIG PICTURE. They are missing a big peice of the big picture- the core, How many nurses do they think they can chop the staffing ratios down to, to take care of a complex acutity level load of patients that will equal well over $45.1 million. Seems to me they better start doing something to hold on to all the "performers" they got. As my own side bar: I attended a seminar in cardiology- more specifically, plaque and CAD. It was said in a current. now a days study, the vessel walls begin to crack and form plaque build up at 'age 12' I repeat, age 12 !! And they want to cleanse the nursing profession of who they consider"low performers' and by whose and what standards??
    I'd say just to throw this out there- these IVORY tower people are a bunch of Turkeys- basted, roasted and stuffed!! JMHO and 2 cents.
    Last edit by kcmylorn on Nov 28, '11
    brandy1017, libbyliberal, IowaKaren, and 4 others like this.
  14. Visit  kcmylorn profile page
    8
    I had a 50 something patient not too long ago, who lost their job, was on unemployment, living with their elderly parent and for went their own medication-BP meds to name a few, so that their elderly parent could afford their meds. This patient was eating out of the soup kitchen near by to save money for the household. This patient has an MI- that how I got that patient. Corporate, self righteous, high brow America needs to wake up. I also sent an unemployed, 40 something young contractor and father of 3 middle school children to the ED with a BP of 212/100- this man was not obese by a long shot. 9% unemployment rate is not breeding health people- It is destroying all the contemporary strides we are making in medicine.
    brandy1017, libbyliberal, IowaKaren, and 5 others like this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top
close
close