The NCSBN Board of Directors voted to raise the passing standard for NCLEX-RN exam - page 3

12/11/2006: the ncsbn board of directors voted to raise the passing standard for the nclex-rn examination... Read More

  1. by   llg
    Quote from lizz
    Just about every health profession has a licensing exam. So ... by the same token, should we allow doctors to practice medicine without taking a licensing exam?

    I always read the same thing: complaints that tests weed out otherwise excellent nurses. But what's the alternative? Doing away with the exam all together? Should nursing be the only healthcare profession without a licensing exam?

    Maybe some people fail simply because they didn't study and just don't know the material. I certainly know people who failed who readily admitted they didn't study. And, quite frankly, I don't think they're going to make great nurses either.

    I wonder why people don't talk about that.

    :typing
    I agree with you on this issue, lizz. No matter what method of evaluation is used, there will always be the people who don't do well who claim the evaluation is unfair. If we did away with written exams, then it would be totally in the hands of the nursing instructors -- giving rise to claims of bias, etc.

    People just don't like being evaluated and judged, period -- and will almost always object to any method of evaluation that they do not control themselves.

    Nursing students have many opportunities to prepare to take the NCLEX and are allowed to re-take it numerous times. The system bends over backwards to give them every opportunity to pass it.
    Last edit by llg on Feb 8, '07
  2. by   Sheri257
    Quote from llg
    People just don't like being evaluated and judged, period -- and will almost always object to any method of evaluation that they do not control themselves.
    I just get tired of repeated statements on this board where people who make good grades and pass the NCLEX the first time are dismissed as merely "good test takers" who aren't necessarily good or competent nurses.

    Maybe ... just maybe ... these people studied really hard and did what they were supposed to do to meet the standards of the profession.

    I'm sure there are people with horrible test anxiety and I'm sure there are some people who don't make the best grades who make great nurses. But, at the same time ... if some of those people don't make it, why is it ok for them to dump on the people who do make it with comments like ... "they're just good test takers." Do they deserve any less respect or consideration?

    If the situation was reversed, and people who passed the NCLEX the first time repeatedly said that some people who didn't pass make lousy nurses ... they'd be blasted all to hell for being non-supportive. Yet, it seems perfectly ok to dump on people who do pass it.

    Quite frankly most (although certainly not all) of the students in my program who have had trouble passing the NCLEX are the same people who barely made it every semester. And 8 times out of 10, regardless of their personal circumstances ... they barely scraped by because they didn't take it seriously and didn't study.

    Many of them are people who put everything off until the last minute, and only put in minimal effort no matter what they do. I don't necessarily think this kind of person makes a great nurse either.

    There are always a few exceptions but maybe ... just maybe ... the NCLEX is actually doing what it's supposed to do most of the time.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Feb 8, '07
  3. by   delorip7
    I read about raising the standards but what does it mean when we are taking the exam. My daughter will be taking it in about two years. When I took it 75 was a passing grade. What about now?:chuckle
  4. by   cntw8tobecomeLPN
    Hi ! To increase the passing rate for the RN's??? How about for the LPN's??!!! Oh no??!!! Because I'm planning to re-take an exam for N-clex PN but don't know when...
    Last edit by cntw8tobecomeLPN on Feb 8, '07
  5. by   nursemomruns
    Quote from Danish
    I I know first hand of 2 other students who have given up on nursing and moved on to another career field due to the lack of instructors and programs available here in Florida.

    We all know that the nursing shortage is going to get worse and the need for qualified nurses is going to grow exponentionally. That being said, leaving the boards as they are is not going to lower tha standards, only keep them as they are. I think we have other issues that the boards of nursing and nursing associations need to address before we hike up the requirements that are already difficult to reach.
    You hit the nail on the head. The shortage isn't due to the increasing passing standards. It is due to a lack of instructors.

    The boards of nursing are the ones who decide if the passing standard gets raised based on research. Practice studies are conducted with new grads every few years and based on what the new grads say they are doing, the NCLEX passing standards are changed. The way they make this determination is based on sound test development theory.

    If new grads are being expected to practice at a higher level, then leaving the passing standard as it is WILL lower our standards of entry level practice.
  6. by   nursemomruns
    Quote from cntw8tobecomeLPN
    Hi ! To increase the passing rate for the RN's??? How about for the LPN's??!!! Oh no??!!! Because I'm planning to re-take an exam for N-clex PN but don't know when...
    It's usually within a year of the RN.
  7. by   Gromit
    Quote from MissPiggy
    Has anyone considered that we have a nursing shortage and this will make it even worse?
    I wouldn't put too much sweat into this new info. It is a good thing to raise the bar, yes its true that many practicing nurses today wouldn't pass a current nclex -but that in of itself doesn't mean a whole lot anyway since said test is an exit point for school, and your hospital / field (whatever) training and experience will be what takes you through your career.

    The year I graduated, the Florida bon raised their pass/fail bar, -I had had a traumatic experience just before I took my NCLEX test (my mother lost her longtime fight with cancer, this was just on the heels of HER father (grandpa to me) passing away from cancer) -but wanted to take the test before the new higher level went into effect. I wasn't mentally ready, and failed it (with 264 questions, so I just kinda skirted the pass/fail line). I took a little time to come to terms with my personal griefs, and re-took the test (after the standard had been elevated) and passed it with the minimum (75) required questions.
    Too many people get caught up in the numbers -my advice for students is to ignore the hoopla, learn your material and pay attention. You will pass it, just as I did, as did those who came before me.

    AS for the concerns about teaching to the test -uhm, ok? Your point would be?? School has ALWAYS taught to the test -thats just the way it is. You won't learn everything in school -and you aren't supposed to. School is no substitute for the real world, but you have to start and get the basics SOMEWHERE. Thats all its good for.

    Their (the board) reasoning is sound, however. Entry level nurses ARE being exposed to a higher (and ever increasing) acuity level of patient. The only way to make sure the schools teach to the new 'basics' is to raise the bar they have to teach to. All professions have THIS kind of thing to deal with -regardless of the field (Engineers, legal, medical, whatever -I know of no professional-level field that lowers pass-fail standards for newer graduates. )
    Last edit by Gromit on Feb 10, '07
  8. by   Little Panda RN
    Quote from cntw8tobecomeLPN
    Hi ! To increase the passing rate for the RN's??? How about for the LPN's??!!! Oh no??!!! Because I'm planning to re-take an exam for N-clex PN but don't know when...

    Actually they raised the passing standard for the nclex pn in 2005. But I am sure they will raise the passing standard again. It seems that whether you are an RN or LPN we as nurses need to know more in order to take care of our aging population and the more complex diseases and health problems we are presented with.
  9. by   NayNaeRN
    just got an email from the dean at our nursing school stating that nclex is raising their passing standard...... didn't get a chance to read the link that he sent yet, but was wondering if anyone else has heard about this ..... i'm graduating from an adn program in may so it applies to me!!! :angryfire yikes!!!! here is the link he sent ( i haven't read it yet)
    https://www.ncsbn.org/rn_test_plan_2007_web.pdf
  10. by   sirI
    Post #35 merged with existing thread about this topic.
  11. by   MS._Jen_RN
    I may repeat, but here are my thoughts:
    The Nursing shortage (and the difficulty of getting into a program) isn't so much about the rate of test failure as it is about the lack of instructors. I have to give it to those who sacrifice $ to be a teacher. I can make A LOT more on the floor as an instructor.

    I, like all of you, have met/worked with RNs who cause me to wonder how they passed the NCLEX. Prehaps raising our standards can help this. I know that the NCLEX doen't neccessarily measure common sense.

    If we seek to define ourselves as a PROFESSION rather than blue collar laborers we need to walk the walk, not just talk the talk. I'd be interested to learn what the passing standard is for the MCAT, LSAT, BAR Exam etc and how that compares to the entry and completion standards in nursing. (I'll try to find out)
    Peace,
    ~Jen
  12. by   Afrolinda
    Quote from MissPiggy
    Has anyone considered that we have a nursing shortage and this will make it even worse?
    I agree with you.
  13. by   JentheRN05
    I have always had test anxiety, and I personally think that the NCLEX was easy. Too easy really. Originally, when I took the test, I simply thought it was too easy, so I must have failed. I've had classmates that had no business even being in clinicals with instructors breathing down their necks. They were crazy scary and I would RUN from any hospital that I saw them working as a nurse at. I think that them making the NCLEX more difficult is a good thing - it is supposed to 'weed' out the unknowing or those that just shouldn't 'be' a nurse. I know I will probably get flamed for that, but it's JMHO so don't take it wrong. It really isn't meant to be mean really, just honest from my perspective on what I've seen.

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