Teacher pulls out insulin pump

  1. Teacher mistakes insulin pump for cell phone

    By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Published by news-press.com on October 5, 2005

    CLERMONT-A substitute teacher pulled out a student's insulin pump after mistaking it for a cell phone, officials said. Cliffton Hassam told East Ridge High School officials that his insulin pump began beeping in class Friday

    http://www.news-press.com/apps/pbcs..../51005005/1075
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  2. 58 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    How awful! I know though that in the high school where my husband teaches, the teaches do confiscate cell phones. However, my husband would never touch a student nor try to grab something out of their hands - they are expected to hand it to the teacher as requested. Ouch!
  4. by   Rohan
    That poor kid!
  5. by   sirI
    Quote from bergren
    Teacher mistakes insulin pump for cell phone

    By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Published by news-press.com on October 5, 2005

    CLERMONT-A substitute teacher pulled out a student's insulin pump after mistaking it for a cell phone, officials said. Cliffton Hassam told East Ridge High School officials that his insulin pump began beeping in class Friday
    http://www.news-press.com/apps/pbcs..../51005005/1075
    This is so horrible. I cannot imagine what went through that nurses mind.

    I can see the lawyers lining up for this.........
  6. by   bergren
    Eagle Ridge High School has 7 assistant prinicpals, and no school nurse ther is a "clerk" in the clinic. http://www.lake.k12.fl.us/school-erh/

    In another article I read the nmother has pressed assault charges and is suing the district.


    Quote from siri
    This is so horrible. I cannot imagine what went through that nurses mind.

    I can see the lawyers lining up for this.........
  7. by   sirI
    Quote from bergren
    Eagle Ridge High School has 7 assistant prinicpals, and no school nurse ther is a "clerk" in the clinic. http://www.lake.k12.fl.us/school-erh/

    In another article I read the nmother has pressed assault charges and is suing the district.
    OMG!!!!

    Well, IMHO, the school district was a liability. I cannot blame the mother in the least........
  8. by   MarySunshine
    I certainly see that the teacher was wrong and terribly agressive to do this, but I'm not sure if I understand the medical implications for the student. Does the insulin pump have to be placed by a health care provider? Why was his blood sugar out of whack?
  9. by   smk1
    As no permanent harm can be proven here, i doubt very much that she has a case against the school district. The school district did the correct thig in terminating the teacher, but she deserves ZERO money from the school. She certainly would be within her rights to try to file an assault charge against the teacher for the teacher putting her hands on the student, however that probably legally wouldn't fly either. She and her soon to ber lawyer will be hoping that they get a quick settlement and not actually have to go to court. The teacher was wrong and was fired, the student was fine, that should be the end of the story as far as the school is concerned. If the student sustained provable damage, or it cost the parents money for the doctors visit and a new insulin pump, then there is a different story. That teacher is a jerk and should have their teaching license suspended.
  10. by   sjb2005
    i'm surprised the teacher was not aware of the student's diabetes or that he wore a pump. our school district informs teachers about students who may need medical attention based on the health of the child.
    who do you fault, the teacher who did not know or the parents, school nurse or even the student who did not let others know the situation. pumpers can have immediate extremes in hypo/hyperglycemia. a pumper has to be prepared in case the delivery of insulin is impaired.
    i know.
    pumping gor over 10 years and my son for 2.
  11. by   sjb2005
    The type of pump the student had is an external pump. The pump is managed by the pumper. It is inserted via needle with a device and then the needle is removed and a small canula is left in the subq tissue. I am surprised it took the weekend for this student to get his blood sugars under control. If he was prepared, he could have reinserted new tubing or survived on injected insulin until he could access his supplies.

    Quote from MarySunshine
    I certainly see that the teacher was wrong and terribly agressive to do this, but I'm not sure if I understand the medical implications for the student. Does the insulin pump have to be placed by a health care provider? Why was his blood sugar out of whack?
  12. by   RN12345656
    [QUOTE=shellyjellybelly]I'm surprised the teacher was not aware of the student's diabetes or that he wore a pump. Our school district informs teachers about students who may need medical attention based on the health of the child.


    The teacher was a substitute. He had no idea of the student's medical condition. The actual teacher probably knows that the student has diabetes.
    Look at the link siri posted...they are begging for subs. Sounds like the school district failed when they hired this joker.
  13. by   sjb2005
    [QUOTE=heartnurseinva]
    Quote from shellyjellybelly
    I'm surprised the teacher was not aware of the student's diabetes or that he wore a pump. Our school district informs teachers about students who may need medical attention based on the health of the child.


    The teacher was a substitute. He had no idea of the student's medical condition. The actual teacher probably knows that the student has diabetes.
    Look at the link siri posted...they are begging for subs. Sounds like the school district failed when they hired this joker.
    I guess I'm siding with teacher on this regardless. This is a lay person and probably unfamiliar with pumps. An honest mistake but I will concede that the aggression toward the student may have been out of line. We don't know, we weren't there.
    Afterall, how can we fault a teacher to mistake pump for a cell phone when our own medical society(nurses+doctors) are not up-to-date on this medical technology when so many people are using it. Awe heck, many nurses lecture me on eating sugar. I just tell them to get with the program and give me my chocolate bar. Get what I mean?
  14. by   Faeriewand
    I was formerly a Child Development Major in college and have worked with children for many years. I've been a pre-school teacher, an after school daycare person for school age kids, and recently worked for my local school district during school hours supervising children, so I have had much paid experience working with children as well as a great deal of volunteer hours. There is no doubt in my mind that the aggression toward the student WAS out of line. If that school district is similar to mine (and I can't imagine too many differences as government agencies know how to cover their butts) then barring emergencies, no employee of a school district is ever suppose to lay their hands on a child in an agressive/angry manner. Upon hire, all employees are informed of school district policies and required to sign a document stating that policies were reviewed. There are policies regarding everything including letting other employees know the medical condition of a student, especially one with diabetes as it may impact the school day.

    The school district failed the student in two ways. Firstly, it failed to protect the student from an overly aggressive substitute teacher by hiring him in the first place. Secondly, the school district, either through the regular teacher,school principal, or designated health clerk, failed to inform said teacher of student's medical condition. This is grounds for a lawsuit. Also, by pulling the insulin pump out the teacher caused the student physical pain. According to the student, who was interviewed on the news, on the teacher's first attempt, the student said, "Ow, that hurts." One can assume then that the teacher knew he was causing pain to the student because the student told him that. Based upoin the antecedent, the teacher then deliberately caused the student more pain by pulling the insulin pump away from the student. So even though he didn't know it wasn't a cell phone, there is still legal grounds to sue for pain and suffering. If the pain and suffering is a small amount then the award for such would most likely be in accordance, but that will be a different sum of money from the one awarded due to the school discricts aforementioned remissness. Pain and suffering would also include any emotional distress and embarrassment.

    Since there are many witnesses to this account, my bets are placed that the school district will settle out of court.

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