Teacher pulls out insulin pump - page 3

Teacher mistakes insulin pump for cell phone By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Published by news-press.com on October 5, 2005 CLERMONT-A substitute teacher pulled out a student's insulin pump after... Read More

  1. by   flashpoint
    Quote from barefootlady
    Poor child, this was unnecessary and mean by any standards. I am thankful this person was fired, hopefully there will be no further employment in any school systems for this abuser. I think a fair settlement would be the school system will pay for all expenses incurred by this students parents for pulling out the insulin pump and having it reinserted, a follow up visit to make sure the pump is working correctly and some counseling for the student and parents r/t post traumatic stress. All employees need a review of the discipline policies in this district. I say this because teachers are human, they have stressful jobs, and perhaps by reviewing the policies better ways to cope with situations may be found. Hiring a nurse would be a good idea too. Even if she only worked part time, some professional expertise on hand or at least on call, is better than none.

    Counseling? Post traumatic stress? I think that is going a bit far...I understand that the situation was probably fightening, annoying, etc, but not really enough to warrant counseling for PTS. I think that the school district should have to reimburse the cost of the tubing and catheter set up...also should reimburse the cost of any extra insulin doses, doctor visits, and to have the pump checked. I think the teacher needs education on discipline measures and insulin pumps...maybe some anger management too...

    Most people who use pumps are prepared for emergencies when the pump malfunctions, becomes dislodged, etc...I have to wonder how prepared this young man was...but I do know that even being off for 15 minutes can send someone's glucose levels into a total tailspin, even when they have a good back up plan in place...
  2. by   mtymom
    I understand that the kid should have been prepared but most schools won't let children keep any medications with them. At the highschool here if the students have Tylenol in their pocket or purse they get suspended. The medication may have been in the school office and by the time he got there his levels may have already been screwed up. Also the teacher might not have let him go to the office right away. It doesn't say in the article. If anyone layed a hand on my child like that I would sue the school. They are supposed to keep the children safe. Background checks should be done on everyone that works at the school including volunteers.
    I wonder if the kid had even had time to tell him what it was if the substitute would have believed him and done what he did anyway. The school was at fault in a way for not letting the substitute know that there was a child in his class that has an insulin pump. The substitute should have been trained in what to do for the child in an emergency. In a way the substitute should also find out what he can do leagally about the school.
    That is just my opinion. No child should ever be treated that way anyway. I don't care what kind of person the child is or if the child is a trouble maker.:angryfire
  3. by   mercyteapot
    Yes, I agree, the sub should've been informed so that such a thing didn't happen. This is a training issue that the district is and should be responsible for, and they made a mistake. That makes them liable. I know FL isn't as litigation friendly as CA, so I have no idea if a lawsuit will be successful there, but I feel sure it would be here.
  4. by   barefootlady
    Well, cotjockey, that would be the purpose of a session or two with a professional counselor, to make sure there is no long term PTS incurred by this student. I cannot begin to determine what may or may not cause a long lasting, detrimental effect on this child, but I do think the child is entitled to at least an assessment. I would have, at one time, without regard to consequences, gone to the school and starting hurting people who were employed there, my temper was terrible, no control just explosions, but I have aged, gotten wiser, attempt to live a better life, and be a kinder person. My hope is that more people are attempting to live kinder and gentlier lives too. A little anger management, a little talk therapy for the child, and proper finincial reimbursment for the family still seems fair. This educator needs a lot of therapy, lots of anger management training, and a little hit in the purse to make them understand kids are not to be abused. I respect your point of view and wish you a blessed and productive day.
  5. by   smk1
    Quote from cotjockey
    Counseling? Post traumatic stress? I think that is going a bit far...I understand that the situation was probably fightening, annoying, etc, but not really enough to warrant counseling for PTS. I think that the school district should have to reimburse the cost of the tubing and catheter set up...also should reimburse the cost of any extra insulin doses, doctor visits, and to have the pump checked. I think the teacher needs education on discipline measures and insulin pumps...maybe some anger management too...

    Most people who use pumps are prepared for emergencies when the pump malfunctions, becomes dislodged, etc...I have to wonder how prepared this young man was...but I do know that even being off for 15 minutes can send someone's glucose levels into a total tailspin, even when they have a good back up plan in place...
    this is pretty much what i was thinking, but because i am not a nurse yet, didn't want to hear the "you aren't a nurse, so you have no idea..." response. The teacher was inappropriate, the correct action was taken by the district, any functional monetary damages incurred from this incident should be covered by the district, and that should be the end of the story as far as the school district is concerned. I have worked in the school system and seen parents try to sue for every little thing under the sun. Our schools are under-funded and under staffed as it is, all these lawsuits do is take away a support persons job, or push back the order of new computers and books for the school because the district has to pay out settlements to people because it is cheaper than going before the courts. What ever happened to people understanding that you don't get paid a cash settlement for every unfortunate thing that happens to you?
  6. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from SMK1
    this is pretty much what i was thinking, but because i am not a nurse yet, didn't want to hear the "you aren't a nurse, so you have no idea..." response. The teacher was inappropriate, the correct action was taken by the district, any functional monetary damages incurred from this incident should be covered by the district, and that should be the end of the story as far as the school district is concerned. I have worked in the school system and seen parents try to sue for every little thing under the sun. Our schools are under-funded and under staffed as it is, all these lawsuits do is take away a support persons job, or push back the order of new computers and books for the school because the district has to pay out settlements to people because it is cheaper than going before the courts. What ever happened to people understanding that you don't get paid a cash settlement for every unfortunate thing that happens to you?
    First of all, no school district is ever without insurance. They may purchase a policy or be a self insured fund. If they are self insured, they have to set aside a specific amount into a 'reserve fund', a hedge against any pay outs. It is only when an award exceeds their policy limits or they fail to set aside sufficent funds, that they get into trouble. Schools are underfunded for a variety of reasons but lawsuuits are not the major reason. One of the major reason's is the failure to raise taxes to a sufficent level because the politicians are afraid of being voted out of office.

    Grannynurse
  7. by   mercyteapot
    It isn't as though money is pulled out of the general fund to pay these lawsuits. That just isn't the way it works.
  8. by   smk1
    Quote from mercyteapot
    It isn't as though money is pulled out of the general fund to pay these lawsuits. That just isn't the way it works.
    no, it isn't, however, schools are alloted a certain amount of money from the budget for the entire year, when the budget is overreached there are repercussions. if claims are made to insurance policies, the rates go up the same as they do for us regular folks, if a payout goes against a school, then that particular school does face repercussions. having worked in a school where this was the case, i know what happens. Yes, schools are under funded for a variety of reasons, i never said that wasn't the case, and as this IS the case then why tax an already depressed system with frivolous suits? This money isn't just going to magically appear and line the pockets of those who sue for it, there are negative consequences that can affect the overall health of a school, the students, and sometimes the parents who must pick up the slack of added school expenses. Sorry, I just don't think this is a case where it is appropriate to sue the district. The teacher was fired which was the appropriate action. i agree that the neccessary medical bills that were incured should be paid but that is a nominal fee. For this student to receive anything else there would need to be proof of punitive damages, of which there are none here. :uhoh21: We may just have to agree to disagree.
  9. by   smk1
    having thought about it, perhaps things are just run differently in different areas... letting this argument go....
  10. by   SharonH, RN
    Guys for all this talk about lawsuits, there has been no indication from the parents that they intend to sue, although they did file a criminal complaint which I probably would have done the same thing. I have read several incidents about this and in not one of them was it mentioned that the family wanted to sue or that they had retained a lawyer. In fact, the mother made a statement that the pump was not damaged and her son was not injured, and her husband stated that there was only a little bleeding from the leg. That does not sound like people looking to grease the school system for a payoff. So for now, the argument may be moot.
  11. by   nursemomruns
    Quote from mtymom
    I understand that the kid should have been prepared but most schools won't let children keep any medications with them. At the highschool here if the students have Tylenol in their pocket or purse they get suspended. The medication may have been in the school office and by the time he got there his levels may have already been screwed up. Also the teacher might not have let him go to the office right away. It doesn't say in the article. If anyone layed a hand on my child like that I would sue the school. They are supposed to keep the children safe. Background checks should be done on everyone that works at the school including volunteers.
    I wonder if the kid had even had time to tell him what it was if the substitute would have believed him and done what he did anyway. The school was at fault in a way for not letting the substitute know that there was a child in his class that has an insulin pump. The substitute should have been trained in what to do for the child in an emergency. In a way the substitute should also find out what he can do leagally about the school.
    That is just my opinion. No child should ever be treated that way anyway. I don't care what kind of person the child is or if the child is a trouble maker.:angryfire
    As far as what to do in an emergency, the American Teachers' Federation advocates calling 911 and that's it. They are firmly against teachers providing medical care. They believe that is the realm of health care providers.
  12. by   URO-RN
    OUCH! Poor kid.
  13. by   nursemomruns
    Quote from cotjockey
    Counseling? Post traumatic stress? I think that is going a bit far...I understand that the situation was probably fightening, annoying, etc, but not really enough to warrant counseling for PTS. I think that the school district should have to reimburse the cost of the tubing and catheter set up...also should reimburse the cost of any extra insulin doses, doctor visits, and to have the pump checked. I think the teacher needs education on discipline measures and insulin pumps...maybe some anger management too...

    Most people who use pumps are prepared for emergencies when the pump malfunctions, becomes dislodged, etc...I have to wonder how prepared this young man was...but I do know that even being off for 15 minutes can send someone's glucose levels into a total tailspin, even when they have a good back up plan in place...
    What causes PTS in one child may not produce PTS in another.The child should be assessed if he is symptomatic - which may include his subjective reports. There are far too many stressful things in this world that children are exposed to that we brush off because they are commonplace or seem minor in comparison to other issues. Problems can develop for them later due to the chronic stress of these seemingly minor issues. The least harmful thing is to have him assessed.

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