Tara Hospital at Brownsville lays off 24 LPNs

  1. tara hospital at brownsville announced the layoff wednesday of its staff of licensed practical nurses, putting about 24 employees on a list of about 62 layoffs during november.


    hospital officials said they are restructuring the nursing services to correct recent deficiencies identified by the state department of health. the hospital now will use only registered nurses.

    "by instituting an all-rn facility, physicians are able to get first-hand information regarding their patients' care while talking directly to their nurse," hospital officials said in a prepared statement. "the medical staff was elated that the administration has pledged to convert to this highest standard of care."
    a change-of-ownership survey performed by the state department of health in september and october identified 63 deficiencies in the day-to-day operation of the hospital. most of the observations by state inspectors refer to failures to establish or follow adopted policies for employees.

    full story: tara hospital at brownsville lays off 24 lpns [pittsburgh tribune-review,pa]
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  2. 29 Comments

  3. by   lpnshortygurl
    I just moved to Pennsylvania (about 20 minutes from Tara Hospital in Brownsville) from Florida and I am utterly shocked at the lack of jobs here for LPN's and then to see that the jobs that they do have are going to be terminated???~!!:angryfire I have to go on and get my RN degree obviously alot sooner than i really wished to!
  4. by   RN34TX
    "By instituting an all-RN facility, physicians are able to get first-hand information regarding their patients' care while talking directly to their nurse........."

    So when the patient was assigned to an LPN, they weren't able to get first- hand information?
    They either couldn't or wouldn't talk directly to an LPN?
    But now with an all RN staff, they'll suddenly be able to get first- hand info that wasn't previously available to them?

    Am I missing something here?
  5. by   pickledpepperRN
    Whatever the deficiencies are I cannot imagine they will be corrected by laying off nurses.
    Fewer nurses= less care.
  6. by   RN34TX
    Quote from spacenurse
    Whatever the deficiencies are I cannot imagine they will be corrected by laying off nurses.
    Fewer nurses= less care.
    Of course it will be corrected.
    The deficiencies must have come from poor patient care given by the under-trained and under-educated LPN's.
    Didn't you know that patient care and outcomes automatically improve when the patient is cared for by an RN instead of an LPN? Any RN will do!

    I sure hope these cocky hospitals are very sure that they won't need their LPN's in the future, because once they've squeezed them out of hospitals in their area, they will have long moved on to an area that does need them.
  7. by   DusktilDawn
    "By instituting an all-RN facility, physicians are able to get first-hand information regarding their patients' care while talking directly to their nurse," hospital officials said in a prepared statement. "The medical staff was elated that the administration has pledged to convert to this highest standard of care."
    Which "medical staff" was elated by this is the question? I doubt it was the majority of RNs. I'd actually be entirely elated if our facility announced that it was going to reinstate LPNs.
    Hospital officials said they are restructuring the nursing services to correct recent deficiencies identified by the state Department of Health. The hospital now will use only registered nurses.
    I noticed the only "deficiency" mentioned is the claim that physicians don't get first hand information regarding patient care while talking directly to their nurse. I've seen many doctors (not all) who never talk to the nursing staff period in regards to their patients. Usually it is the nursing staff informing the doctor rather than the doctor seeking the nursing staff for patient information. Strange, no mention of the "other deficiencies" that is implied.
  8. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Why of course, as an LPN, i tell the housekeeper the info, who THEN passes it on to the physician. Unless the housekeeper is busy, THEN i tell the kitchen staff.

    So till then, they'l overwork the RNs to make up for the "shortage" that administration created. Not only is that can of worms open, it is rusty and rotten.

    Genius!
  9. by   DutchgirlRN
    Ignorant just totally ignorant!

    We only have 2 LPN's on day shift on med/surg but I'm telling you they are the first one's I would pick to take care of me. Recently when my daughter had her c-section her primary nurse for the 3 days was an LPN and she was totally awesome. I do understand the difference in pay related to having a degree, other than that I don't see any difference.
  10. by   pedinurse05
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Why of course, as an LPN, i tell the housekeeper the info, who THEN passes it on to the physician. Unless the housekeeper is busy, THEN i tell the kitchen staff.

    So till then, they'l overwork the RNs to make up for the "shortage" that administration created. Not only is that can of worms open, it is rusty and rotten.

    Genius!
    LOL....that's right tell the housekeeper or kitchen staff who can relay the info to the doc. What a lame excuse. Any good nurse will report findings to the doc, regardless of their title!
  11. by   lpnshortygurl
    I love how everyone looks down on LPN as if we have no education at all. I cannot tell you how many people change their entire demeanor when I go from mentioning that I am a nurse to "I am an LPN" when asked "LPN or RN?" I hate that! Then to make matters worse I am 25 years old and 5'3 and very petite so "AUTOMATICALLY" I am already "too young" or whatever to be a nurse so throw on that I am an LPN and "I AM PLAIN STUPID"~!
  12. by   Faeriewand
    Hmmmm perhaps the hospital's reasong for firing the LPN's was just to save money? Why else just suddenly fire all the LPN's? You are going to have a shortage of nurses! Then they can just hire a few more nurses but not quite enough, after all, I don't think the bottom line here is patient safety, but money!
  13. by   RN34TX
    Quote from Faeriewand
    Hmmmm perhaps the hospital's reasong for firing the LPN's was just to save money? Why else just suddenly fire all the LPN's? You are going to have a shortage of nurses! Then they can just hire a few more nurses but not quite enough, after all, I don't think the bottom line here is patient safety, but money!
    Is the bottom line EVER about patient safety?
    It seems as if patient safety is for us to worry about after hospitals decide to re-configure the staff to meet their budget guidelines.

    I went to a work Christmas party last night and I can't tell you how many "directors," "coordinators," "supervisors," and "managers" I met at that party that I'd never seen previously at work.
    I'm so glad that the budget always allows for hiring an ample number of people who can tell me how to do my job and leave it to me to figure out how it's going to get done with a skeleton crew.
  14. by   Judee Smudee
    I think this is a trend that is part of a cycle. I think that as we get deeper into the nursing shortage it will reverse and then all of a sudden LPNs will be all the rage. I have seen this come and go.

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