Surgeon snaps pic of pt's tattooed genitals in OR..shows it to other doctors - page 7

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  1. by   Tweety
    Quote from sleepyndopey
    I have had patients who have raped children and have no remorse, even bragged about it to other patients. An individual who is hiv + and had unprotected sex with several unsuspecting partners. I have also treated every last one with courtesy and dignity. If you noticed, I did say I thought the surgeon was wrong. I will not, however, say I respect every patient just because they are ill.
    Thank you.
    I can support that. Respect has to be earned, and not all patients, such as the one's you describe aren't worthy of my respect. I'm only human.
  2. by   mesixfuture
    As an OB nurse, I have seen my share of tatooed genitals. Everything from a caution sign that warns slippery when wet, to cat eyes, and my personal favorite, the phrase "jump on it". It's stunning and kinda funny. The surgeon should absolutely not have taken a picture, because that is a HIPPA violation. But I don't think he should lose his license for a momentary lapse of judgement. A write-up, reprimand, whatever, but that's a lot of years of school and hard work to lose for something like that. My apologies to the hot rod in question
  3. by   morte
    Quote from TiredMD
    http://www.azcentral.com/community/s...oto1219ON.html
    In an update on Mayo's Web site, President and CEO Denis Cortese said, "There have been two different individuals who violated our policies concerning respect and privacy."

    One, the update says, is the "inappropriate cellphone picture" taken by the surgeon. The other ethics breach, Cortese wrote, was by an employee who reported the incident and the patient's name to the media.

    "The insult to our reputation, our patients and our staff is the greatest outrage," Cortese wrote.

    The Arizona Republic on Tuesday identified the resident as Hansen. Patient Sean Dubowik, 37, whose penis bears the tattooed words "Hot Rod," said Hansen called him and acknowledged shooting the photo on Dec. 11 while he inserted a catheter prior to gallbladder surgery.


    Clearly the surgeon was wrong for taking the picture and showing it to other staff. However, another employee of Mayo informed the news media of the incident and gave the patient's name to the public. This is as eggregious as the cell phone picture. Maybe even worse, since it subjected this patient to public ridicule. Of course this person should lose their job and license, just as Dr. Hansen has.
    and this maybe Mayo's attempt at covering their corporate butt.....
  4. by   EmmaG
    Quote from TiredMD
    http://www.azcentral.com/community/s...oto1219ON.html
    In an update on Mayo's Web site, President and CEO Denis Cortese said, "There have been two different individuals who violated our policies concerning respect and privacy."

    One, the update says, is the "inappropriate cellphone picture" taken by the surgeon. The other ethics breach, Cortese wrote, was by an employee who reported the incident and the patient's name to the media.

    "The insult to our reputation, our patients and our staff is the greatest outrage," Cortese wrote.

    The Arizona Republic on Tuesday identified the resident as Hansen. Patient Sean Dubowik, 37, whose penis bears the tattooed words "Hot Rod," said Hansen called him and acknowledged shooting the photo on Dec. 11 while he inserted a catheter prior to gallbladder surgery.


    Clearly the surgeon was wrong for taking the picture and showing it to other staff. However, another employee of Mayo informed the news media of the incident and gave the patient's name to the public. This is as eggregious as the cell phone picture. Maybe even worse, since it subjected this patient to public ridicule. Of course this person should lose their job and license, just as Dr. Hansen has.
    Has Hansen actually lost his license? All I can find is that he's been reported to the Board. I can find nothing about a decision. But I agree; whoever tipped the media should lose their job and be reported as well.

    The photograph apparently was shown to several doctors at the hospital.

    http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/story/104900
    Might be another doc, though.
  5. by   KYCNM
    OK, perhaps he doesn't lose the license, but has to pay the $250,000 HIPAA fine that Mayo will, no doubt be hit with because that is the fine that can be assessed.

    Excuse me, but why was a senior surgical resident inserting a foley catheter?
  6. by   Otessa
    Quote from sleepyndopey
    I do not believe that all patients deserve respect. That said, I believe the surgeon was wrong for doing what he did.
    So all patients don't deserve to be respected that includes their privacy?!?
    If we can't respect that, then we are in the wrong profession.....
  7. by   PiPhi2004
    Thats hilarious. I know a doc where my mom worked who took pictures of a guy who got a class ring stuck on his penis and showed them to nurses around the hospital (including my mom). It happens. I think its pretty dang funny myself.
  8. by   namaste_71
    Quote from Mulan
    How do you know so much about it?
    What is with you and your inane questions? If someone gives a bit of information about the case, you're either insinuating he/she is the one who reported the actions or hinting he/she is involved in the case somehow.

    Think it might be that, like others on this board, we're just speculating or discussing the case?
    Last edit by namaste_71 on Jan 1, '08 : Reason: fixed misspelling
  9. by   NRSKarenRN
    doctor...likely will avoid federal charges

    sandra raynor is spokeswoman for the u.s. attorney's office, which enforces the federal health insurance portability and accountability act that protects patients' privacy rights.

    raynor said hipaa violations are misdemeanors, and no one in arizona has been prosecuted under the four-year-old statute.

    "hipaa is not even the point," said chic older, executive director of the arizona medical association. "many ethical boundaries (relating to patient privacy) were crossed."

    older agrees dr. adam hansen should have been disciplined.

    still, he said, the doctor did not do physical harm to the patient.

    "he just made a stupid error in judgment," older said, adding that hansen is paying a very high price.

    older said hansen could be brought before the arizona medical board for unprofessional conduct.

    roger downey, spokesman for the physician's licensing agency, said he does not know whether anyone filed a complaint against hansen.

    i am a little concerned about some of the laissez faire postings on this thread.
    issue is professional ethics and need to maintain them.

    from ama: code of medical ethics

    iv. a physician shall respect the rights of patients, colleagues, and other health professionals, and shall safeguard patient confidences and privacy within the constraints of the law.

    viii. a physician shall, while caring for a patient, regard responsibility to the patient as paramount.

    from ana: code of ethics for nurses with interpretive statements

    [s]
    1. the nurse, in all professional relationships, practices with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth and uniqueness of every individual, unrestricted by considerations of social or economic status, personal attributes, or the nature of health problems.

    2. the nurse's primary commitment is to the patient, whether an individual, family, group, or community.

    3. the nurse promotes, advocates for, and strives to protect the health, safety, and rights of the patient.



    provisions 1-3 fundamental values and commitments of the nurse
    the fundamentals of nursing ethics, the fundamental values and responsibilities nurses assume, are expressed in the first three provisions of the code. when nurses need help expressing their primary commitment, that is, what serves as the core of their professional activity, they can find that core commitment outlined in the first three provisions of the code. these values include nurses' respect for human dignity, nurses' primary commitment to the patient, and nurses' protection of patient privacy.

    what does respect for human dignity mean in health care and how will it be demonstrated? the concept of human dignity, flowing from the principle of respect, is expressed in numerous ways when nurses go about their work. the idea is based on the principle of respect for persons and is derived from the philosopher immanuel kant's rationalist theory, as well the judeo-christian texts, that people should treat others in the same manner in which they desire to be treated: that persons should be treated as ends in themselves, not as means to an end. this attitude translates into respect for all persons.
    respecting all persons means the nurse should honor human dignity in every encounter with every patient and in all encounters with other professionals. for the bedside nurse, this can be expressed in small gestures such as closing curtains for privacy, and in large gestures, such as assuring patient autonomy through the establishment of conditions necessary to provide truly informed consent.
    [/s]

    errors of judgement do occur. education and periodic re-education/in-services are key to keeping these lapses to a minimum.

    it is important for us to acknowledge and re-mediate situation whenever possible. having served on colleague grievance task forces, i suspect doctor will be requested to take an ethics course, present to his peers on topic and have license sanctioned with fine but allowed to and practice with closel supervision.


    some nurses have faced similar verbal talk over patients anatomy...
    lets list ideas of "best practices" to defuse/handle situation.
  10. by   sleepyndopey
    Quote from Otessa
    So all patients don't deserve to be respected that includes their privacy?!?
    If we can't respect that, then we are in the wrong profession.....
    Give me a break. I explained myself in a previous post. Go back and read it. I'm bored with this now.
  11. by   BBFRN
    Quote from nrskarenrn
    respecting all persons means the nurse should honor human dignity in every encounter with every patient and in all encounters with other professionals. for the bedside nurse, this can be expressed in small gestures such as closing curtains for privacy, and in large gestures, such as assuring patient autonomy through the establishment of conditions necessary to provide truly informed consent.
    [/s]
    thanks for clarifying the definition of respect as it pertains to the nurse/doctoratient relationship. under this definition, i can say yes- this patient (as do all patients) deserved respect.
  12. by   Weeping Willow
    Quote from sleepyndopey
    I have had patients who have raped children and have no remorse, even bragged about it to other patients. An individual who is hiv + and had unprotected sex with several unsuspecting partners. I have also treated every last one with courtesy and dignity. If you noticed, I did say I thought the surgeon was wrong. I will not, however, say I respect every patient just because they are ill.
    Thank you.
    Thanks for clarification. I understand now that you treat all patients properly but do not always like them, feel good about them. That I understand. I am the same way. Something about hate the sin, love the sinner.

    For me, I have enough to do just to do my work without the added burden of thinking very much about what someone did wrong. It is asking too much of any human, including nurses, to like everyone all the time and like all that they do.

    Again, thanks for clarifying.
  13. by   bill baldwin
    PiPhi2004

    Why don't you tell us where your mom and this
    doctor work so we can make sure we're never patients there.

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