Study: Uninsured No More Likely To Use ER Than Insured - pg.2 | allnurses

Study: Uninsured No More Likely To Use ER Than Insured - page 3

by mary brophy marcus, usa today a kiss gone awry isn't the typical route that lands a person in the emergency room, but that's just how maggie craytor ended up in the niversity of virginia... Read More

  1. Visit  dthfytr profile page
    2
    IMHO too many doc's offices cherry pick patients and dump everything else in the ER. I see doc offices open a few days per week, and a lobby full of angry patients wanting their prescription refills, lab, or x-rays their primary doc could have ordered directly.
    And God help the patient who needs to be admitted. They tie up a bed in the ER for hours waiting for their primary to come in after office hours. Tie up a few beds that should turn over 8 patients a day because they're waiting hours for their attending, and no wonder you can hear the people in the waiting room chanting "nuke the nurses, nuke the nurses."
    Not_A_Hat_Person and Altra like this.
  2. Visit  tewdles profile page
    2
    I would suggest that we fund more community health centers, particularly in poor urban settings. The access to primary health care is bleak in too many neighborhoods.
    Not_A_Hat_Person and Elvish like this.
  3. Visit  Elvish profile page
    5
    I am a huge believer in CHCs. I used to work in one that did A LOT of things, and am fairly certain we saved a lot of people trips to the ED. We ran in lots of IVFs for patients with blood sugars through the roof, treated lots of green tobacco sickness for our migrant farmworkers that came in sick as dogs, did daily IV antibiotics to treat cellulitis, things like that, that otherwise they might have gone to the ER for. I don't think that's THE answer but I do think it could be a good part of a bigger solution.
    lorazepam, dscrn, VickyRN, and 2 others like this.
  4. Visit  kcochrane profile page
    2
    I find the current trend is to come to the ER because they can get tests done faster. People put off tests for months and then finally decide its urgent. They know coming to the ER will get it done faster. The best part is that they then get upset because they've had to wait all day.
    carolinapooh and Altra like this.
  5. Visit  tewdles profile page
    0
    you are quite right elvish...there is no single answer to our health care woes...

    I think that is why the arrogance of our legislators to think that THEY should decide how to "fix" it is so annoying.
  6. Visit  VickyRN profile page
    0
    Quote from tewdles
    I would suggest that we fund more community health centers, particularly in poor urban settings. The access to primary health care is bleak in too many neighborhoods.
    We have a federally funded rural health clinic in our town - in fact it is within easy walking distance from our ER with plenty of parking spaces. Its hours are very accommodating - open from early AM to 8PM many nights. Still, many of our Medicaid patients will come to the ER instead of visiting the clinic for either of the following reasons:

    1. Can't afford the very small co-payment required for Medicaid patients to use the clinic.
    2. Don't want to wait.
  7. Visit  dscrn profile page
    0
    Quote from Elvish
    I am a huge believer in CHCs. I used to work in one that did A LOT of things, and am fairly certain we saved a lot of people trips to the ED. We ran in lots of IVFs for patients with blood sugars through the roof, treated lots of green tobacco sickness for our migrant farmworkers that came in sick as dogs, did daily IV antibiotics to treat cellulitis, things like that, that otherwise they might have gone to the ER for. I don't think that's THE answer but I do think it could be a good part of a bigger solution.
    Seems like a real good place to start...
  8. Visit  dscrn profile page
    1
    an earlier post-er mentioned how hard it is to reach an md in the evening, on weekends....Very true, along with the fact that if you call ANY md's office, and the recorded message states "if this is a true lifethreatening emergency, hang up immediately-and call 911-, or go to the nearest emergency room.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  9. Visit  carolinapooh profile page
    0
    Quote from dscrn
    an earlier post-er mentioned how hard it is to reach an md in the evening, on weekends....Very true, along with the fact that if you call ANY md's office, and the recorded message states "if this is a true lifethreatening emergency, hang up immediately-and call 911-, or go to the nearest emergency room.
    And what's "life threatening" can be WAAAYYYY too subjective...........even when the REALITY is something else.
  10. Visit  Not_A_Hat_Person profile page
    0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    "She was running after her older brother Luke to give him a kiss, and she fell and got a cut right underneath her eye," says her mother, Allison. Maggie, now 4, needed two stitches. Her mother is glad the family had insurance to cover the costly emergency visit her pediatrician's office recommended.
    I bolded that line because it illustrates why so many insured people use the ER. Why couldn't the MD's office do the stitches? What about steri-stips?

    I spent 2 years as an ER volunteer in Boston. My shift was in the morning, during the week. A lot of people who came in for x-rays, MRIs, or various tests were sent by their MD's office. Forget about an office visit outside of 9-5 Monday-Friday. Boston had no urgent care centers at the time, and community health centers had very narrow windows for walk-in patients. The ER is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

    Ten years ago, I fell down some stairs and sprained my left foot. It was a Tuesday morning, I had insurance, and I was very surprised when my MD sent me to the ER for x-rays. Three years ago, I almost had to go to the ER for a strep test: I was between MDs, and going to a community center during their 1-hour walk-in period meant missing work, which I couldn't afford.

    If MDs didn't send non-emergency patients to the ER for care, and offices were open after 5 and on weekends, fewer non-emergency patients would go to the ER.

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