Study of U.S. Nurses Finds Young Leaving Profession; Shortage May Reach Crisis.... - page 2

Study of U.S. Nurses Finds Young Leaving Profession; Nurse Shortage May Reach Crisis Sooner than Thought September 5, 2002 In one of the most far-reaching studies of... Read More

  1. by   VickyRN
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    I beleive the solution lies in better working conditions and lower, safer and reasonable pt loads for nurses.

    I don't think new nurses are leaving because they are poorly prepared, or that their education was inadequate, I think that's a separate issue.
    I don't think getting a BSN, or being a diploma nurse is an issue here.

    From the results of the study, and my own personal experience, I think it's all about the working conditions.
    :yeahthat: It is getting so bad in some of these units, that it is humanly impossible to deliver safe, effective care (even if you are an experienced diploma nurse of 30 years). This is why the new grads are leaving; not because of inadequate preparation in school.
  2. by   EvePooh
    Quote from fergus51
    We took full patient loads during our preceptorships (when we worked with an RN one on one). The instructors didn't have to follow us around since we had one nurse all to ourselves. This was less than 10 years ago, and my niece graduated from the same program less than 3 years ago. She did the same thing. I think it's too important to not be done.
    Yup...we will have that perceptoship before graduate..but just for 3 week(120hours) only. How long is that for other school?

    Eve
  3. by   lllliv
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    I beleive the solution lies in better working conditions and lower, safer and reasonable pt loads for nurses.

    I don't think new nurses are leaving because they are poorly prepared, or that their education was inadequate, I think that's a seperate issue.
    I don't think getting a BSN, or being a diploma nurse is an issue here.

    From the results of the study, and my own personal experience, I think it's all about the working conditions.

    ABSOLUTELY!!!!!
  4. by   fergus51
    Quote from EvePooh
    Yup...we will have that perceptoship before graduate..but just for 3 week(120hours) only. How long is that for other school?

    Eve
    My own school had us do it for 4-6 weeks at the end of 3rd year, then again for 2 months near the end of fourth year. I honestly feel shocked when a new grad here is surprised when she finds out the patient ratio or says that she's never worked a night shift before.
  5. by   sbic56
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    From the results of the study, and my own personal experience, I think it's all about the working conditions.
    Yes, Agreed. Nurses are expected to be caregivers, waitresses, teachers, advocates, liasons, housekeepers, PR specialists. They must possess knowlege of law, IT. Advances in medical treatment require the nurse to be nearly as knowledgable about the treatment as the physician. All the while the population they serve is becoming older and sicker. This current philosophy of treating patients as customers produces a sense of entitlement which makes all of the above duties even more impossible to accomplish. Bedside nursing needs an overhaul. For nursing to keep on going in this direction spells disaster. This tired old model is collapsing under the weight of unrealistic expectation.
  6. by   hipab4hands
    Quote from lllliv
    ABSOLUTELY!!!!!
    Our lovely administration, is now writing nurses up for:

    Not saying "thank you for calling " at the end of a phone call with patients.

    Never mind that it can take up to 20 minutes for clinic patients to reach a nurse by phone, due to short staffing . I guess that's just not a priority .
  7. by   sbic56
    Quote from hipab4hands
    Our lovely administration, is now writing nurses up for:

    Not saying "thank you for calling " at the end of a phone call with patients.

    Never mind that it can take up to 20 minutes for clinic patients to reach a nurse by phone, due to short staffing . I guess that's just not a priority .
    Makes me crazy when administration instructs us how to speak on the phone. Might as well add receptionist and secretary to the list of what we as nurses must do...and do well! Give me a break!
  8. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    .....at the bedsie and in a chronic dialysis unit, doing direct pt care.

    The education these nurses had didn't make a bit of difference in how they were treated. They were expected to empty trash-cans and wipe down machines just like the rest of us. In fact, I think the PhD nurse was treated worst of all because some people were threated by her.

    Both the MSN nurses I worked w/ in dialysis and the PhD nurses I worked w/ in an inpt hospice setting quit because they were treated like crap and did not expect that (nor should anyone) with their advanced degrees.

    As an ADN nurse, having been a CNA and an LPN, I knew that crappy treatment was the norm.

    These advanced degree nurses had been taught they they would be respected and listened to, and they were not.

    When a doc yells at you, does he check your badge first to see if you have a BSN?

    No. Treating nurses like crap and working them to death is ingrained in the culture of healthcare.

    Again,
    I don't think a nurse's level of education affects how she will be treated as a bedside nurse, or prepares her for it.
  9. by   OC_An Khe
    It is not about education. The question is are nurses who are working in nursing but not in the hospital at the bedside, are they leaving the profession as rapidly as those working at the bedside? If they are then something is wrong with the profession as a whole. But if it is only the bedside nurse that is leaving then one must look at the working conditions of the bedside nurse. Remember even though when we think of what nursing is we have an image of a bedside nurse over 40% of nursing employment is not hospital based. I didn't read the whole study so I am not sure if these variables were taken into account.
  10. by   Judee Smudee
    Quote from ocankhe
    It is not about education. The question is are nurses who are working in nursing but not in the hospital at the bedside, are they leaving the profession as rapidly as those working at the bedside? If they are then something is wrong with the profession as a whole. But if it is only the bedside nurse that is leaving then one must look at the working conditions of the bedside nurse. Remember even though when we think of what nursing is we have an image of a bedside nurse over 40% of nursing employment is not hospital based. I didn't read the whole study so I am not sure if these variables were taken into account.
    My experience is that non bedside nurses that work in institutional positions stay in their positions until they are carted out feet first. This includes staff educators, infection control nurses, patient educators and people in IT. Their turnover rate is nothing like the bedside nurses turnover rate. Managers and supervisors have slightly worse turnover rate than the first group I named but it is still much lower than bedside nurse. I am betting scientific study will bear me out. I can't speak for offices nurses I just don't have any first hand experience there.
  11. by   grentea
    I just graduated from nursing school and when I was at my graduation last week something that my dean said and many other speakers kind of bothered me. Well it was pretty much the same thing that everyone from my next door neighbor to my hairdresser says to me: "You'll always have job and they sure do need nurses out there." I know that I'll always have job, but from what I've seen on this board, I'm not sure I'll always want it. There is such a a focus on churning out new nurses that one might think the answer is to simply step up production at all nursing factories...uh..I mean nursing schools everywhere. I think this study proves that this definitely is NOT the answer and that as a profession we need to focus on change and finding out why so many new nurses have been leaving so quickly. Part of the mentality that was greatly emphasized at our nursing school was that we should just shut up and deal with whatever we thought needed to change because that's just the way things are going to be. I think that a lot of this sort of thinking still happens in nursing along with the fact that it seems that most nurses are too busy with the resposibilities being heaped on them to participate in research that would benefit their own profession. My school tripled its standard class size with my class. Obviously they were of the the nurse factory mentality, although it kind of backfired on them and now they're back down to the original class size. Anyways I'm hoping to see some positive change in nursing in my lifetime. I want to get involved in research and I'm excited about my new job. I hope that nursing is as rewarding as nursing school has been for me and really hope that in a year or two I'm not totally burnt-out.
  12. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from greentea
    I just graduated from nursing school and when I was at my graduation last week something that my dean said and many other speakers kind of bothered me. Well it was pretty much the same thing that everyone from my next door neighbor to my hairdresser says to me: "You'll always have job and they sure do need nurses out there." I know that I'll always have job, but from what I've seen on this board, I'm not sure I'll always want it. There is such a a focus on churning out new nurses that one might think the answer is to simply step up production at all nursing factories...uh..I mean nursing schools everywhere. I think this study proves that this definitely is NOT the answer and that as a profession we need to focus on change and finding out why so many new nurses have been leaving so quickly. Part of the mentality that was greatly emphasized at our nursing school was that we should just shut up and deal with whatever we thought needed to change because that's just the way things are going to be. I think that a lot of this sort of thinking still happens in nursing along with the fact that it seems that most nurses are too busy with the resposibilities being heaped on them to participate in research that would benefit their own profession. My school tripled its standard class size with my class. Obviously they were of the the nurse factory mentality, although it kind of backfired on them and now they're back down to the original class size. Anyways I'm hoping to see some positive change in nursing in my lifetime. I want to get involved in research and I'm excited about my new job. I hope that nursing is as rewarding as nursing school has been for me and really hope that in a year or two I'm not totally burnt-out.

    Great post- you are wise beyond your nursing experience.

    One thing, though-
    I have been a nurse for 12 years. Three years ago, I moved for my husband's job to an area where there is a surplus of nurses, and very few nursing jobs.
    My best friend is in the same boat- in another state.

    Months at a time go by where there is not a single ad for a nurse in my local classifieds. The local hospitals often have hiring freezes, and won't even accept applications from nurses. Most facilities here have very poor working conditions, terrible staffing ratios and rock-bottom pay. They can get away with it, as nurses here are desperate for jobs.

    I became a traveler for this reason. Yes, I will always have a job, but I must leave my home and husband to find one. I just came off of nine months of back-to-back travel contracts.

    I enjoyed good pay and working conditions on my assignments in another state.

    I wish I could find that where I live.
  13. by   papawjohn
    Hey Helllllo

    Gosh. Where do y'all live?

    Papaw John

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