Study addresses shortage of nurses

  1. The shortage of registered nurses in the United States could be lessened by adopting tactics used successfully in other segments of the economy, such as incentives to keep experienced nurses on the job and attract those who have left the profession, according to a University at Buffalo study.

    The research compared nurses age 50 and older with nurses younger than 50. The comparison showed that older nurses were more satisfied, more committed to their organization and had less desire to quit than younger nurses.

    The study suggested ways to increase retention, including creating pools of older nurses who are willing to fill in for vacations and other short-term needs, making equipment safer and more ergonomically correct, offering more flexible hours and increasing wages.

    Full Story: http://www.buffalonews.com/cityregio...ry/191115.html
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   oramar
    The suggestion to make nursing more ergonomically safe is a good one. However, the one that suggested they bring nurses who left the bedside and are currently practicing in the education field and insurance business back to the bedside, shows a lack of understanding of why those people went into those fields in the first place. Mostly they ran from the bedside screaming and ain't nothing bringing them back.
  4. by   CrunchRN
    Never say never Oramar! It would take a lot though to get me to do hands on nursing in the facility setting.
  5. by   teeituptom
    There isnt a shortage of Nurses

    Never has been, Never will be
  6. by   Brian
    Just for the record, I don't always agree with the articles I post Many times, I post them to share what has been published and for discussion.
  7. by   teeituptom
    Quote from brian
    Just for the record, I don't always agree with the articles I post Many times, I post them to share what has been published and for discussion.
    makes sense to me I guess maybe:spin:
  8. by   nurseinlimbo
    If managers and cliques would stop allowing new hires and new grads to be "chased away", we wouldn't loose 50% of new nurses in the first 3 yrs.
    Also, new hires and young nurses want vacations and weekends, and partime so that they can spend time with family, and are burnt out before they qualify...
    Paying dues I think they call it....
  9. by   EwwThat'sNasty
    I remember reading in a journal, it was "Nursing Education," or something like that. The date was about three years ago. It related a study in three "major Massachusetts hospitals" where recent grads entered fast-track step-down, icu, etc. training programs. After a year, depending on which hospital, 40-70 of each hundred, depending upon the hospital were gone. The ubiquitous reason: perception of lateral violence, aka bullying. Nurses don't just eat their young, by and large, at too many places, they torture them--and then they leave. I agree with oramar, but one rarely hears it said out loud. Try to find the turn-over rate in many ICU's--you won't, but if you're there and you count, it can be quite huge. Unless the work-them-to-death, get-em-on-the-floor frame of mind ends, and unless nurses stop being bullies, there will be a shortage in these high stress areas. And people like me will turn to insurance, and "safer" places. Even if they'd rather work in the high stress areas like ED and ICU.
  10. by   ebear
    DUES PAID--GAMES PLAYED--QUITTING STAYED :spin:
    ebear
  11. by   kalaka24
    I am doing a paper in my BSN class on the shortage of nurses & I am supposed to "collaborate with a nursing colleague on-line" on this topic. If anyone is interested, I welcome any comments or conversation. I have been a nurse for 10 years and didn't really notice how bad the shortage was until I transferred to CCU 5 years ago. I worked in sugery prior to & we were never short staffed. There has been a huge turn over rate in my unit over the past few years & it has gotten worse here lately. I work at nights & am usually the charge nurse. I have the most experience among my younger co-workers & I am usually the one who trains them & helps them from night-to-night. But it kicks my butt sometimes when we are busy with a lot of sick hearts, a lack of experience, and to top it off, short staffed. I am scared most of the time that somebody is going to die because I can't be in every room all of the time. I am being stretched so thin that I am considering transferring to another department where there is less stress and less responsibility. If anything goes wrong on my shift, my NM blames me b/c I have the most experience. This really makes me mad b/c I cannot babysit these new nurses all night. I have my patients to take care of also. When I suggest that maybe he not hire new grads in CCU, he tells me that nobody is applying but new grads so his hands are tied. There are not enough nurses & the ones we do have wind up getting burned out & leaving the profession altogether or doing less stressful jobs that they don't really enjoy doing. I don't want to leave CCU but I can't take much more of working short and still being expected to provide excellent care. If anybody would like to respond back & tell me about your situations working short-staffed, I would greatly appreciate it. I will include your info in my paper. Thanks!

    Quote from EwwThat'sNasty
    I remember reading in a journal, it was "Nursing Education," or something like that. The date was about three years ago. It related a study in three "major Massachusetts hospitals" where recent grads entered fast-track step-down, icu, etc. training programs. After a year, depending on which hospital, 40-70 of each hundred, depending upon the hospital were gone. The ubiquitous reason: perception of lateral violence, aka bullying. Nurses don't just eat their young, by and large, at too many places, they torture them--and then they leave. I agree with oramar, but one rarely hears it said out loud. Try to find the turn-over rate in many ICU's--you won't, but if you're there and you count, it can be quite huge. Unless the work-them-to-death, get-em-on-the-floor frame of mind ends, and unless nurses stop being bullies, there will be a shortage in these high stress areas. And people like me will turn to insurance, and "safer" places. Even if they'd rather work in the high stress areas like ED and ICU.
    Last edit by kalaka24 on Oct 28, '07 : Reason: misspelled word
  12. by   raemon
    ahhhh... if you have shortage of nurses there...here in philippines, nurses in hospital as volunteer with a ratio of 1nurse is to 3-4patient....
  13. by   nurseinlimbo
    Our city hospital is notorious for high turnover in the casual and PT new hires area, partly because grads move on to other areas, and partly because of floor politics. Even seasoned nurses who transfer from one floor to another often quit because of cliques and bullying and they are often more experienced than the nurses they are being harassed by.
    I see now that they are implementing a new grad retention program such as someone else here talked about, where grads are given positions of .7 to FT for one year, will have to see if it works.
    Also, I received a bursary for OR training a year ago, took it, was hired and quit because it was such a miserable place to work. There were 6 of us, and out of 6 I think 3 stayed. The group that followed us was 3, and 1 stayed. All felt the same way. But the hospital is still offering the bursary, what a waste of money, why don't they deal with the problems?
  14. by   EwwThat'sNasty
    They're not likely to deal with the problems. Nursing schools are turning out 1.5 to 2x the number of grads that they did three years prior. Meat for the cannons.... Also it's cyclical. Hospital hires 100 nurses, six months later, 15 are left--all do to enforced overtime. So they change that--two years pass... politicos say: "save money," enforced overtime returns, nurses quit... Can you say "stupid?" I have recommended nursing to friends, but since two have gone that route, and are dissatisfied, I no longer recommend it... One can rise above the politics to a point by becoming an NP--but then, they will attempt to work you to death.... I love being a nurse, but am awestruck in a negative way about the lack of nurturing that exists... and the misuse of humans. The weird part is they wouldn't allow you to treat a patient that way...

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