Sleeping pills helps woman wake up from 6 year coma!

  1. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/liv...n_page_id=1965

    "Sleeping pill helped my girl wake up from a SIX year coma





    By BETH HALE - Last updated at 22:22pm on 30th October 2007

    After her teenage daughter slipped into a coma, Thelma Pickard never lost hope of recovery.


    Six years on, the devoted mother is daring to believe her hopes may be answered.

    Daughter Amy, now 23, has begun to show signs of life after being given an over-the-counter sleeping pill. Last night Mrs Pickard said the 'old sparkle' returned to her daughter's eyes when she was given a pill and described the change as 'amazing'. "
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   JustaGypsy
    Unbelieveable... and awesome, all at once.
  4. by   Multicollinearity
    I'm trying to figure out what the mechanism of action was in this case (for the zolpidem). Amazing! Thank you for posting this.
  5. by   BrnEyedGirl
    Zolpidem is Ambien,.NOT "an over-the-counter sleeping pill",.. would like to read more about the "hows and whys" though.
  6. by   leslymill
    How totally wonderful. This girl is in the UK. Wonder if Ambien is OTC there.
    Last edit by leslymill on Nov 1, '07
  7. by   EmmaG
    [font=times][color=#231f20][color=#231f20][font=times]promising long-term results
    of zolpidem treatment for the
    permanent vegetative state

    [font=times][color=#231f20][color=#231f20][font=times] zolpidem is an omega-1-specific indirect
    [font=times][color=#231f20][color=#231f20][font=times] γ[font=times][color=#231f20][color=#231f20][font=times]-aminobutyric acid (gaba) agonist used to
    treat insomnia; this drug has also previously
    been reported to improve the condition of
    patients with brain disorders ranging from the
    permanent vegetative state (pvs) to stroke-
    induced aphasia. a recent study of patients
    categorized to the pvs who were given long-
    term treatment with the drug has now also
    reported very encouraging results.
    the researchers investigated the effects of a
    10 mg daily dose of zolpidem in three patients.

    [font=times][color=#231f20][color=#231f20][font=times]two of the patients were aged 31 years and
    had been in pvs for 3 years following motor
    vehicle accidents; the third patient was
    29 years old and had been in the condition for
    5 years after almost drowning. patients were
    scored on the glasgow coma scale and the
    rancho los amigos cognitive scale before
    and 1 h after drug treatment; in each patient,
    dramatic improvements on both scales were
    recorded after treatment.
    at the time of the study report, the patients
    had been receiving zolpidem daily for between
    3 and 6 years. all patients experienced daily
    arousal from their pvs following treatment,
    with dramatic improvements in their ability to
    interact meaningfully with others. the patients
    experienced maximum arousal 1 h after treat-
    ment, and the drug's effects subsided approxi-
    mately 4 h later. no long-term adverse effects
    were observed.
    the authors propose that zolpidem's mode
    of action could involve reactivation of dormant
    neurons in injured brain tissue. they suggest
    that the drug might have a wide application in
    patients with brain injury, and add that further
    testing is planned to assess the effects in larger
    groups of patients with brain damage.
    [font=times][color=#231f20][color=#231f20][font=times] original article
    [font=times][color=#231f20][color=#231f20][font=times] clauss r and nel w (2006) drug
    induced arousal from the permanent vegetative state
    [font=times][color=#231f20][color=#231f20][font=times]neurorehabilitation 21:23-28
    i was only able to pull this up with a google cache search.


    http://www.headway.org.uk/sitepages....=163#dec06art1

    http://counsellingresource.com/medic...gory/zolpidem/

    http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/ebm/search

    fascinating.
    [font=times][color=#231f20][color=#231f20]
  8. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from RN-Cardiac
    Zolpidem is Ambien,.NOT "an over-the-counter sleeping pill",.. would like to read more about the "hows and whys" though.
    I hear you. My local newspaper wrote a story about the "MRSA virus" the other day.
  9. by   Multicollinearity
    Since the above says the patients were on zolpidem for 3 to 6 years, I wonder if there is an excitable rebound effect after tolerance to the sedative effects is reached? What I mean is something like this - you know how a patient dependent on benzos long-term can have a seizure if they stop taking their benzos suddenly? Well maybe with zolpidem after tolerance has been reached, there is a quick withdrawal effect due to the short half-life - the patient is more arousable and neurologically excitable. This would be similar to the benzo patient who quits and has a seizure. This is fascinating.
  10. by   EmmaG
    Quote from multicollinearity
    Since the above says the patients were on zolpidem for 3 to 6 years, I wonder if there is an excitable rebound effect after tolerance to the sedative effects is reached? What I mean is something like this - you know how a patient dependent on benzos long-term can have a seizure if they stop taking their benzos suddenly? Well maybe with zolpidem after tolerance has been reached, there is a quick withdrawal effect due to the short half-life - the patient is more arousable and neurologically excitable. This would be similar to the benzo patient who quits and has a seizure. This is fascinating.
    I wish I could figure out a better way to search for the research on this; when I do manage to find something, it requires a subscription to access ><
  11. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    I wish I could figure out a better way to search for the research on this; when I do manage to find something, it requires a subscription to access ><
    Do you have a Medscape subscription? Maybe I'll search that when I have more time, later. For me, all medical searches start at Medscape.com.
  12. by   EmmaG
    Quote from multicollinearity
    Since the above says the patients were on zolpidem for 3 to 6 years, I wonder if there is an excitable rebound effect after tolerance to the sedative effects is reached? What I mean is something like this - you know how a patient dependent on benzos long-term can have a seizure if they stop taking their benzos suddenly? Well maybe with zolpidem after tolerance has been reached, there is a quick withdrawal effect due to the short half-life - the patient is more arousable and neurologically excitable.
    http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_i...2005100C132438

    This is the story of the 31 year old, and the docs are the ones who did the study. This reads to me that they noticed the effect and then did the research, but that the initial dose of zolpidem did have an effect.

    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/tm_obje...name_page.html

    MIRACLE TREATMENT HERE BY 2009
    A BRITISH doctor, Ralph Clauss, has just discovered why Zolpidem has a miraculous effect on coma patients.
    The consultant at Royal Surrey County Hospital in Guildford, says: "Louis' case is phenomenal and opens doors for permanent vegetative state patients improving consciousness.
    "The drug will not work on all brain damaged patients, though. It depends on the size of the area of their brain that is 'asleep'.
    "Zolpidem is most effective on people who have a large area of their brain which is dormant. Patients are prescribed it to help them sleep as it activates receptors in the brain that enhance chemicals involved in inducing sleepiness.
    "When brain damage occurs, these receptors change shape. This new shape is then distorted by the drug and causes the nerve cells to resume normal activity again.
    Percy Lomax, chief executive of ReGen Therapeutics, the firm patenting Zolpidem to use on patients with brain dormancy in the UK, says:
    "This is a major breakthrough and very exciting because you can change people's lives."
    "We have tried the drug on other patients in South Africa with varying forms of dormancy and the vast majority have responded well.
    "We are now doing trials on 20 of them to see if it can change their brain dormancy with a lesser dosage. We then have two further trial phases.
    "If it all goes positively we will be able to register it for use in Britain. It should be on the market by 2008/2009."
  13. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_i...2005100C132438

    This is the story of the 31 year old, and the docs are the ones who did the study. This reads to me that they noticed the effect and then did the research, but that the initial dose of zolpidem did have an effect.

    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/tm_obje...name_page.html

    MIRACLE TREATMENT HERE BY 2009
    A BRITISH doctor, Ralph Clauss, has just discovered why Zolpidem has a miraculous effect on coma patients.
    The consultant at Royal Surrey County Hospital in Guildford, says: "Louis' case is phenomenal and opens doors for permanent vegetative state patients improving consciousness.
    "The drug will not work on all brain damaged patients, though. It depends on the size of the area of their brain that is 'asleep'.
    "Zolpidem is most effective on people who have a large area of their brain which is dormant. Patients are prescribed it to help them sleep as it activates receptors in the brain that enhance chemicals involved in inducing sleepiness.
    "When brain damage occurs, these receptors change shape. This new shape is then distorted by the drug and causes the nerve cells to resume normal activity again.
    Percy Lomax, chief executive of ReGen Therapeutics, the firm patenting Zolpidem to use on patients with brain dormancy in the UK, says:
    "This is a major breakthrough and very exciting because you can change people's lives."
    "We have tried the drug on other patients in South Africa with varying forms of dormancy and the vast majority have responded well.
    "We are now doing trials on 20 of them to see if it can change their brain dormancy with a lesser dosage. We then have two further trial phases.

    "If it all goes positively we will be able to register it for use in Britain. It should be on the market by 2008/2009."
    Thank you for posting this! This is so fascinating (and it makes my last theory moot). It sounds like the drug is working like a 'reset button' of sorts.
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Nov 1, '07
  14. by   amyk_ncsu
    I wonder if they have to keep taking it forever to maintain whatever LOC they can reach, or if they return to the vegetative state if they stop taking it....

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