Should we prepare to protect ourselves from the new super-resistant TB strain? - page 3

Your thoughts and concerns, please. Here's the article link and a portion of the article: Super-Strain Of TB Found In S. Africa Doctor: Drug-Resistant Form Of Tuberculosis Has Killed 52... Read More

  1. by   indigo girl
    Did he know he had XDR-TB or not? It sounds like he found out in Italy, but
    flew anyway. I wonder what we will learn from this case, and how this will decide the way the rules will change in the future. What about if he did infect anyone? Can you say law suit?

    http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...41&postcount=7

    Quote from http://www.ajc.com/search/content/health/stories/2007/05/29/0530meshtb.html
    "I didn't want to put anybody at risk," the Fulton County man, who declined to be identified because of the stigma attached to his diagnosis, said in a telephone interview with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "We just wanted to come home and get treatment."

    Since January the man, who said he has no symptoms and feels healthy, has met regularly for treatment with Fulton County health officials. He said they and CDC knew he had drug-resistant TB before he left the United States but did not prohibit him from leaving when he told them about his upcoming wedding in Greece.

    He questioned why nobody told him to cancel his wedding before he left Atlanta — and why the CDC waited until he was on his honeymoon in Rome to order him into isolation.
  2. by   indigo girl
    Here is the text of the CDC briefing today on what has happened so far. In case the news story disappears, here is a link to flutrackers where the information will be preserved:

    http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...30&postcount=1
  3. by   nurse-to-be1000
    [quote=indigo girl;2226380]What do you think that they should do with this man? He was told not to fly, but he did anyway? He knowingly, it seems, exposed other passengers on two different planes to XDR-TB.

    From what I heard on Good Morning America who had someone from the CDC on, the person didn't have a symptoms (I am not sure why he was tested) but was advised that the doctors would prefer if he didn't fly-they didn't say he couldn't. The CDC got involved after he flew overseas. The person flew back to Canada instead of turning himself into the Italian authorities because he didn't want to end up in an Italian hospital.

    I find it surprising that the CDC says only those people who were within a few rows of the man on the airplane need to be tested. They say TB can't survive on the surfaces so anyone who boarded the plane after the man got off is safe. It is scary how fast a disease can spread the way people can travel today across the globe.

    I find it interesting that the man's bride has tested negative for TB. They say the couple was practicing safety precautions.

    According to the news this is the first time since the 60s that someone has been put under federal custody for an illness. The last federal protection custody dealt with a person who had smallpox.
  4. by   indigo girl
    [QUOTE=nurse-to-be1000;2227259]
    Quote from indigo girl
    What do you think that they should do with this man? He was told not to fly, but he did anyway? He knowingly, it seems, exposed other passengers on two different planes to XDR-TB.

    I find it interesting that the man's bride has tested negative for TB. They say the couple was practicing safety precautions.
    Safety precautions? I wonder what those would be.
    Last edit by indigo girl on Jun 2, '07
  5. by   indigo girl
    Talk about a bizarre story, I can't even believe some of the details of this case. The
    quarantined TB patient is the son in law of a CDC microbiologist.
    Not only that, he is a personal injury lawyer!

    And, amazingly he was allowed to cross the boarder from Canada into the US even
    though his passport was flagged and there were clear instructions to detain him.

    I guess, if you look healthy and honest, you can get away with murder...
    He does look like a personable kind of guy.

    How does this happen? No repercussions? Don't worry, be happy. Everything
    is just fine.

    http://crofsblogs.typepad.com/h5n1/2...nt_get_aw.html

    Quote from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20070531.wtbguy0531/
    BNStory/International/home
    Mr. Speaker was allowed back into the U.S. on May 24, after he flew to Canada to
    avoid being stopped by U.S. health officials.

    Along the border crossing at Champlain, N.Y., an inspector ran Mr. Speaker's
    passport through a computer, and a warning — including instructions to hold the
    traveller, don a protective mask in dealing with him, and telephone health
    authorities — popped up, officials said.

    About a minute later, Mr. Speaker was instead cleared to continue on his journey,
    according to officials familiar with the records.
    http://crofsblogs.typepad.com/h5n1/2...uestions_.html
    Last edit by indigo girl on May 31, '07
  6. by   indigo girl
    It's a very strange story.

    Here are some comments from a nurse at flutrackers, and Dr. Thornton, MD,
    a psychiatrist who was himself on INH for one year.

    http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...7&postcount=10

    http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...1&postcount=12
  7. by   indigo girl
    An opinion piece on the Andrew Speaker case:

    http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...41&postcount=1

    Quote from http://www.concordmonitor.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070623/REPOSITORY/706230303/1028/OPINION02
    ...Speaker's action highlights how much the perceptions of single patients can affect the public health.

    "It may be that the most effective way to safeguard the health of the public at large is to assure the person who is sick - or, in this case, the carrier - that he will not be abandoned," said Johns Hopkins bioethicist Nancy Kass.

    Whether it was necessary to slap a detention order on Speaker soon after he re-entered the United States has become a subject of debate in public health circles.

    Some believe the action violated a principle enunciated in another context by Louisiana State University legal scholar Edward Richards: that "the state demonstrate that the action ordered is intended to prevent harm in the future, not to punish for past actions, and that the action is reasonably related to the public health objective."
  8. by   indigo girl
    Well guess what? The globe trotting attorney did not have XDR TB. Nope, just MDR TB. Oops!

    Will he take legal action against the CDC, and for what?

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19585052/
  9. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from indigo girl
    Well guess what? The globe trotting attorney did not have XDR TB. Nope, just MDR TB. Oops!

    Will he take legal action against the CDC, and for what?
    Why would he sue?

    A responsible human being has no business traveling with ANY FORM OF TB, much less MDR TB.

    Correct me if I am wrong, but aren't most/all legal immigrants screened for ANY form of TB and kept out. My understanding is that immigrating nurses are screened prior to coming, to prevent spread.

    During SARS, weren't exposed people expected to obey certain isolation restrictions even if they were not known to be positive yet?

    And many places require observed administration of TB meds....especially when the pt has demonstrated noncompliance. This guy should definitely qualify and that would effectively limit travel.
  10. by   indigo girl
    Quote from caroladybelle
    Why would he sue?

    A responsible human being has no business traveling with ANY FORM OF TB, much less MDR TB.

    Correct me if I am wrong, but aren't most/all legal immigrants screened for ANY form of TB and kept out. My understanding is that immigrating nurses are screened prior to coming, to prevent spread.

    During SARS, weren't exposed people expected to obey certain isolation restrictions even if they were not known to be positive yet?

    And many places require observed administration of TB meds....especially when the pt has demonstrated noncompliance. This guy should definitely qualify and that would effectively limit travel.
    I don't know that he would, most especially since everyone was so amazingly lenient to him. But he is an attorney after all, and they did misdiagnose his case possibly causing great distress that such Dx could be fatal. No is arguing that he
    should have been traveling at all, but he went anyway. He was slick, and unpredictable.
  11. by   indigo girl
    Report on TB Case Cites Security Gaps

    http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5h...NrqIpVHC0HSfKQ

    Quote from http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5hcZ63P6Ze9MxVnNrqIpVHC0HSfKQ

    A congressional investigation into officials' inability to stop a tuberculosis patient from leaving the country found significant security gaps, heightening concern about vulnerability to potential cases of pandemic flu or smallpox.

    A report on the May incident involving an Atlanta lawyer who caused an international health scare found that the Centers for Disease Control lacks a sound way to prevent someone infected with a biological agent from entering or leaving the United States.

    The review by the House Homeland Security Committee's Democratic staff was to be released Monday, one day before the sixth anniversary of the 2001 terrorist attacks against the U.S.

    Since the Sept. 11 strikes, the government has focused on all types of possible threats and sought to find ways to best detect and counter biological agents.
  12. by   indigo girl
    I was scanning this article for pandemic flu information, but what this woman
    said about the globe trotting lawyer with MDR TB was interesting. Apparently,
    she was assigned to his case. She is a nurse in charge of a CDC quarantine
    station. Imagine that...

    I am trying to imagine what they did not tell us.

    http://www.lacrossetribune.com/artic...s/z02cdc27.txt

    Quote from //www.lacrossetribune.com/articles/2007/09/27/news/z02cdc27.txt


    She said the second biggest threat to public health is multi-drug resistance organisms, such as TB and streptococcus.

    Polder said she was extensively involved in the May TB incident with Atlanta lawyer Andrew Speaker, who was able to fly out from Atlanta to Europe for his wedding and honeymoon despite warnings from public health officials.

    She said she flew with Speaker from Atlanta to Denver, and proper precautions were taken.

    “Much of what was reported in the media was true, but a lot was not said, and I can’t talk about it,” Polder said.
  13. by   leslymill
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...030301311.html

    A CLEAR indication why those who can afford organic food should buy and promote it's production.

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