scrutiny over money paid to hire more nurses

  1. SACRAMENTO - State money paid to hospitals to hire more nurses will receive greater scrutiny from outsiders if the Legislature adopts plans proposed Monday by a panel that criticized the program's lack of accountability.

    A Senate budget subcommittee probing whether hospitals received money to meet new nurse-to-patient ratios while not complying with them voted to make state officials report on whether the budgeted money went for its intended purpose.

    "We ought to find out if hospitals are complying with that law," said subcommittee chair Sen. Denise Ducheny, D-San Diego.

    The hearing played out as the California Nurses Association continues to battle Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger over the number of nurses required in California's 400 hospitals. The union, which plans major protests Tuesday in San Francisco and a billboard campaign attacking the governor, has claimed the Schwarzenegger administration paid hospitals $27 million to help hire more nurses even as it tried to overturn a new law requiring their hiring. The CNA also alleged that some hospitals may have taken state money to hire more nurses even as they didn't do the hiring.

    A definitive answer remained elusive Monday, frustrating Ducheny and the author of the 1999 law requiring hospitals to hire one nurse for each five patients by last Jan. 1.

    "It seems money specifically allocated to advancement of nurse-patient staff ratios was not spent to do that, or it can't be shown that it was spent to do that," said Sen. Sheila Kuehl, D-Santa Monica.

    Full Story: http://allnurses.com/forums/newthrea...ewthread&f=195
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   lee1
    Quote from brian
    SACRAMENTO - State money paid to hospitals to hire more nurses will receive greater scrutiny from outsiders if the Legislature adopts plans proposed Monday by a panel that criticized the program's lack of accountability.

    A Senate budget subcommittee probing whether hospitals received money to meet new nurse-to-patient ratios while not complying with them voted to make state officials report on whether the budgeted money went for its intended purpose.

    "We ought to find out if hospitals are complying with that law," said subcommittee chair Sen. Denise Ducheny, D-San Diego.

    The hearing played out as the California Nurses Association continues to battle Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger over the number of nurses required in California's 400 hospitals. The union, which plans major protests Tuesday in San Francisco and a billboard campaign attacking the governor, has claimed the Schwarzenegger administration paid hospitals $27 million to help hire more nurses even as it tried to overturn a new law requiring their hiring. The CNA also alleged that some hospitals may have taken state money to hire more nurses even as they didn't do the hiring.

    A definitive answer remained elusive Monday, frustrating Ducheny and the author of the 1999 law requiring hospitals to hire one nurse for each five patients by last Jan. 1.

    "It seems money specifically allocated to advancement of nurse-patient staff ratios was not spent to do that, or it can't be shown that it was spent to do that," said Sen. Sheila Kuehl, D-Santa Monica.

    Full Story: http://allnurses.com/forums/newthrea...ewthread&f=195
    There should be a call to audit all of their books then-------wonder how many upper managers received bonuses, etc. also
  4. by   pickledpepperRN
    Arnold admitted on "Hardball" he allowed the hospitals to spend the money before losing in court.
    Where is the respect for the law?

    http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/s...nurseslaw.html

    Panel seeks more scrutiny over money paid to hire more nurses

    By Jim Wasserman
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    5:07 p.m. April 4, 2005

    SACRAMENTO - State money paid to hospitals to hire more nurses will receive greater scrutiny from outsiders if the Legislature adopts plans proposed Monday by a panel that criticized the program's lack of accountability....

    ..."It seems money specifically allocated to advancement of nurse-patient staff ratios was not spent to do that, or it can't be shown that it was spent to do that," said Sen. Sheila Kuehl, D-Santa Monica.

    "Certainly our contract assumes that hospitals are in compliance with the law," responded J. Keith Burger, executive director of the California Medical Assistance Commission, a public body that negotiates state payments to hospitals. "We're not just negotiating contracts that say you can just willy nilly avoid that."

    But neither Burger and Stan Rosenstein, deputy director of the state Department of Health Services, could say for sure that the nurse-staffing money went to pay for more nurses.

    The subcommittee's proposal for more detailed oversight will become part of budget negotiations and must be approved by both houses and the governor.

    California's hospitals are being forced to have one nurse on duty for each five patients after a Sacramento Superior Court ruling that struck down Schwarzenegger's November emergency rules to delay the requirements until 2008.
  5. by   scooterRN52
    Quote from brian
    SACRAMENTO - State money paid to hospitals to hire more nurses will receive greater scrutiny from outsiders if the Legislature adopts plans proposed Monday by a panel that criticized the program's lack of accountability.

    A Senate budget subcommittee probing whether hospitals received money to meet new nurse-to-patient ratios while not complying with them voted to make state officials report on whether the budgeted money went for its intended purpose.

    "We ought to find out if hospitals are complying with that law," said subcommittee chair Sen. Denise Ducheny, D-San Diego.

    The hearing played out as the California Nurses Association continues to battle Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger over the number of nurses required in California's 400 hospitals. The union, which plans major protests Tuesday in San Francisco and a billboard campaign attacking the governor, has claimed the Schwarzenegger administration paid hospitals $27 million to help hire more nurses even as it tried to overturn a new law requiring their hiring. The CNA also alleged that some hospitals may have taken state money to hire more nurses even as they didn't do the hiring.

    A definitive answer remained elusive Monday, frustrating Ducheny and the author of the 1999 law requiring hospitals to hire one nurse for each five patients by last Jan. 1.

    "It seems money specifically allocated to advancement of nurse-patient staff ratios was not spent to do that, or it can't be shown that it was spent to do that," said Sen. Sheila Kuehl, D-Santa Monica.

    Full Story: http://allnurses.com/forums/newthrea...ewthread&f=195
    What an outrage! All hospitals should be audited and those guilty of holding back those funds should be arrested, isin't that a felonious crime?

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